The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Don’t mind the fact I’m wearing sneakers... I forgot my boots again but I needed to ride him.

Anyways, I was wondering what I should try to work on with my position. I’ll include a picture of how I’ve improved since jumping Justice.

I know I need to push down in my heel, and I normally do it’s just because I was scared of slipping because of my awful shoe choice.

The one on the appy is from about 3 months ago. The two ones on Bee are from Yesterday!
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Joined
·
36,137 Posts
Now I've got the others.
Your arms have improved but they're still looking really stiff/rigid - you need more elasticity.
I think they are part of the reason why you tend to get the hollow back, the other is that you crank your neck so you're looking upwards rather than forwards.
You're still using your stirrups like pedals which is why you're going too far up out of the saddle which in turn destabilizes your lower leg.
You need to work on the horse's impulsion (impulsion is not speed) so he goes forwards with energy and gets those front legs up and together - his current action is dangerous. If he gets a pole between those legs you're going to have a wreck


I know you're only schooling but I'm going to do a George Morris here and tell you that you should have proper boots on and tie your hair back so it isn't all hanging loose. Those are both for safety, not for looks. I know there are some top showjumpers that leave their hair loose, it sets an awful example. If it gets caught up on something you'll get scalped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,105 Posts
Is your coach allowing you to jump that?! I'm a western rider, and know that jumping something like lawn chairs is a great way to break your neck and the horse in an accident... PLEASE get some safe jumps! And no jumping in heel-less shoes! Your horse is not tight with his knees, and an accident waiting to happen with the pole on lawn chairs. What happens if he puts a leg through that chair?

I actually think your form was better in the earlier photo. You're tense and not following his jump now.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,747 Posts
Think it is time you leave a pair of heeled boots at the barn for the days you forget...
Change into them, change out of them but please...your foot not supported is not making you ride any better.
It is dangerous too as you know. :|

So, lower leg is better, would be better yet if your foot didn't collapse on the stirrup tread...
You are still throwing your upper body ahead of the horses rising to clear that jump...
That over-arched back, the turtle neck are what happens when you jump ahead of the horse.
Let the horse rise to your body...
Get in a 2-point and canter that line/approach...now move your arms and hold your body in the elevation of your 2-point...the horse will move right up into the open space you made for him...
Your back, neck, body and lower leg will stay in align and your head will gracefully follow as you look through the ears softly forward with your eyes.
You're actually trying to hard...so it looks "false positioned"....

I second, secure that hair...braid it in a single braid so it is down your back not flapping around.
The chairs...well, some have obviously not seen what hunter/jumper shows of the 60's & 70's had for "challenging" jumps. Similar is what you could encounter in the show ring during that era.
Do not ever jump it the other direction as that is where huge risk is should you have a stop or bad dump...

Your horse needs to learn to push from behind, and you need to learn to ask for it and not accept anything different when jumping.
If you can't get the push then you canter a circle and set-up again...but no heavy on the forehand, pulling you along and taking a jump...
Bee has a habit of hanging a hoof, a leg...not tucking those knees tight and high and that makes jumping any size fence have greater risk of a touch/hit.
Impulsion comes from behind...that is the push off the ground to launch, arc and land with a pretty rounded appearance not go flat...flat gets a leg/knee unfolded and dropped down. You do not need speed to have great impulsion... I have seen horses clear 6' walls from a slow trot...called impulsion and push..not pull.
Your eye is getting better for a take-off spot but still needs work...
But you need to get Bee pushing, striking off from behind in his approach to the fence not coming heavy on a forehand...
Your second picture from yesterday astride Bee you actually snatched and smacked Bee hard in the mouth...
The first he was rising to you and able to use his neck to balance as he arced over the fence...
The second picture you strangled him as he was working to arc and land...you threw your body on his front end even though you look "poised" you dumped on him.
It is getting better...there is improvement seen...but you're truly not a team yet consistently.
If we could take your body from the first fence and put it on the second horse jumping...you would have something the horse could truly work with.
A nice distance off to launch, a nice arc happening and the horse would of been able to reach with his head/neck for the landing and ....
Bee is a large horse with a large stride...something very different from Justices.
Bee has power where he will throw you forward of his momentum if you not be in balance with him as he soars over fences..

Soften that spine, it does not need nor should it be ramrod straight and over arched with shoulder pinned open...it needs to move with the horses movement and just soften so it is more comfortable for you , for Bee...it will stop much of the pounding you feel sitting up there if you just soften and relax your spine...
Honest.
Some rough edges but they are better...

Your picture with Justice, no just no, ...
Your hands alone with broken wrists, clenched fists for rein finesse, arms afraid to extend offering rein and soft communication...and just throwing your body yet you have no ability to stabilize your weight where you trapped your arms against you and you are not yet ready to do a following hand for head release over fences....
Nope, not going there..please don't go back to those Justice habits..
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,105 Posts
I think both you and this horse would benefit greatly from several months of dressage lessons. It would really help your jumping and his impulsion and form. He's not coming in to the fence using himself, so he's not jumping well. He may also benefit from some ground poles to help both of you find the proper takeoff spot-- my old coach would tell you he jumps nothing without a ground pole for three months, and that's after several months of flatwork to fix the other issues leading to the jumping issues. With his uneven legs, he NEEDS to come in properly or he's going to hang a leg and catch a rail. He's learning bad habits. Fix that self-carriage issue and get him round and listening to you and you may be surprised how much easier he is to get collected and how much better he jumps. Your position is ahead of him and tentative-- if he were to stop or bobble on landing, you'd be off over his head in a heartbeat. Let his jump fold you over, don't do it before he does. I agree to tie your hair back and leave a pair of boots at the barn so you always have them. If your helmet was fitted with your hair up under it, it's too loose with your hair down. If it's fitted with your hair down, at least put it in a bun or tight braid so it's not flying all over. Catch your hair on a jump standard if you fall, and you'll regret it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Next time you forget your boots, ride without stirrups or do not ride. I’m not being mean, it is a safety issue.

This is a very good video by Bernie Traurig with excellent advice. It’s long, but worth it.

Agree with others, lawn chairs can be unsafe. Sure we jumped them way back then, but we have learned so much more about safety since then.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
You are out of the saddle, get your butt down and behind you.

Before the jump push deep into your stirrups, go into a 2 point, not up into a 2 point. 2 point is not an upward motion, it's just a closing of the hip. Practice the difference at a walk, see what it's like to 2 point ahead, over, and behind the motions- you can feel the difference.

I think riding some hunters might help the position. They lay flat and crest release, then once you are in a relaxed jumping position you can build it up to a nice eq position.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top