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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve been looking into putting my mare on the equine elixirs supplement Ulceraser. She doesn’t have a history of colic or ulcers( although she could have ulcers that I don’t know about), and wanted to put her on it as a precautionary measure. Has anyone here used it before? If so what did you think?
 

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The first question for any brand name supplement is: what is in it?
The second question is: why am I feeding it?
The third question is: is there any data (actual studies by actual scientists) to show the ingredients work in the dose provided, for what I want to treat? This is often very hard to come by, as supplement makers depend on the pocketbooks of the gullible worried horse owners who want to do the very best by their beloved steeds.

Most of the people I know who feed supplements have very little idea why they are doing it, and whether it works. As they say, the plural of anecdote is not data. Meaning, three people who say they thought they saw something happen when they fed it is not confirmation that it works.

I feed a forage balancer pellet year round to supply minerals and vitamins my hay and grass may not have. If I have a horse who has a demonstrated need for more, I try to figure out what that "more" is.

Horses get ulcers for reasons. Mainly because we add so much stress to their lives. Remember always that horses are designed to range slowly in small, stable groups while eating poor-quality forage almost constantly. Virtually everything we do to them and for them that isn't that, is some level of stressor. Focusing on removing or mitigating stressors (such as providing some kind of graze) is more effective than feeding nearly any kind of supplement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The first question for any brand name supplement is: what is in it?
The second question is: why am I feeding it?
The third question is: is there any data (actual studies by actual scientists) to show the ingredients work in the dose provided, for what I want to treat? This is often very hard to come by, as supplement makers depend on the pocketbooks of the gullible worried horse owners who want to do the very best by their beloved steeds.

Most of the people I know who feed supplements have very little idea why they are doing it, and whether it works. As they say, the plural of anecdote is not data. Meaning, three people who say they thought they saw something happen when they fed it is not confirmation that it works.

I feed a forage balancer pellet year round to supply minerals and vitamins my hay and grass may not have. If I have a horse who has a demonstrated need for more, I try to figure out what that "more" is.

Horses get ulcers for reasons. Mainly because we add so much stress to their lives. Remember always that horses are designed to range slowly in small, stable groups while eating poor-quality forage almost constantly. Virtually everything we do to them and for them that isn't that, is some level of stressor. Focusing on removing or mitigating stressors (such as providing some kind of graze) is more effective than feeding nearly any kind of supplement.
I agree with you completely. I’m not a huge fan of most gut and ulcer supplements because they often have little conclusive evidence or really shouldn’t be fed to a horse long term. Of course, the best way to keep ulcers away and is through your horses lifestyle and not through a feed supplement. My horse is outside almost all the time with her friends except for in bad weather or when being fed. I try to keep things low stress for her and she gets only a small amount grain. I would love to have her go grain free, but trainer would rather her be on a grain since she is in work. It’s tribute feed, so it’s not a terrible grain. She can be a bit high strung sometimes, and I know that a lot of horses can have ulcers without us knowing, so I was considering putting her on it for a bit just to see how she reacted. I have done a lot of research on this supplement and I really like it and what’s in it, I’ll put the link to their website below if you or anyone else was interested in it.
Again, I completely agree with you about being cautious of supplements, and it’s one of the reasons I don’t feed a lot of them. (The only supplement she is on a currently is a flax supplement since it’s winter and the grass quality us poor)

 

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I have no knowledge or experience with the supplement mentioned and so can't really address the question posed.

But I do have related thoughts.

When my horse first came into my care he had not been wormed for some time. I was searching on the net for the best program or what is best for worming a horse as I was a total newbie at that time. After reading several opinions I read one that said to have a fecal test done and treat for what existed. DUH!:)

So that's what I did. Based on that experience, if I in anyway suspected ulcers in my horse, I would likewise test prior to any medication. I have not researched that topic extensively but do see a Succeed fecal blood test recommended in a few places. I believe a vet has to do that.

I also watched a video on acupuncture testing for ulcers in horses on YouTube. Not sure about that but interesting.

I am personally against feeding any grains. If I had a horse that I thought might have an ulcer problem I would absolutely demand that the horse receive no grains.

Secretariat is said to have succumbed to being fed too much oats.

The thing that worries me about grain is that the forgut empties in around 30 minutes and passes to the hindgut. Any starch or sugar not digested in the forgut begins fermentation in the hindgut which kills the microbes in the hindgut that are designed to digest the roughage that passes from the forgut.

And that can cause acidosis of the hind gut which causes not only ulcers but an avalanche of other serious problems. I do know of a person on this forum whose dear Arabian ultimately passed from what was determined to be an overload of oats being fed.
 
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If you want to feed a supplement, I'd say this one is not one I'd choose. It is being marketed for ulcers.
The label shows it is mainly a supplement of fatty acids, contains one of the three essential amino acids, and contains a small dose of magnesium.

Basically, feeding fatty acids is saying you acknowledge the horse's fermenation process is not working, and so you need to supplement them as an energy source. To me it would make more sense to feed probiotics and prebiotics to get the fermentation process working better. Which also prevents ulcers by creating the right Ph balance.

The only thing that could remotely be linked to helping with ulcers is the tryptophan, which "might" calm some horses but the studies I've seen did not support that it did.
The magnesium dose is not big enough to do much.

What it appears to me is that whoever made this supplement was trying to find a way to feed chia seeds to horses, which some people believe are a "super food" for humans.
It could give your horse a shiny coat, but seems quite expensive for that.

I'd suggest if you want to spend money on a supplement, a well rounded vitamin and mineral supplement would be a lot more useful to your horse. Or a true gut supplement with a good dose of probiotics and prebiotics for digestive health.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So that's what I did. Based on that experience, if I in anyway suspected ulcers in my horse, I would likewise test prior to any medication. I have not researched that topic extensively but do see a Succeed fecal blood test recommended in a few places. I believe a vet has to do that.

I also watched a video on acupuncture testing for ulcers in horses on YouTube. Not sure about that but interesting.

I am personally against feeding any grains. If I had a horse that I thought might have an ulcer problem I would absolutely demand that the horse receive no grains
thank you for your response. I have done the acupuncture test on my mare and she shows no signs of ulcers. Although I don’t think she has ulcers, just because she doesn’t show any outward signs doesn’t mean she doesn’t have any, so I just wanted to put her on a good supplement to support her gut. I’m not a fan of most gut supplements since I think they aren’t the best supplements to have your horse on for long periods of time, but after researching equine elixirs I decided to try it out. I never planned on keeping her on it permanently, but just wanted to use it for a few months, and I feel that the ingredients aren’t going to harm her if she doesn’t have ulcers and would still offer some support. Since I posted this thread I actually have put her on it but after doing some more searching I will probably switch her to Amiquell by horsetech. It has probiotics, prebiotics, and herbs and it is designed for gut support.

I agree with you on feeding grains, but my trainer thinks it is best for her to get some (she is only feed a small amount).
 

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I know we are not supposed to link to other forums but if you go to tiktok and find devinoutwest, it has a good point to make about ulcers ...

In case this video link is allowed I will copy the address:

 

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(she is only fed a small amount).
I wanted to ask, how much is a small amount? If I were in that situation, I would carefully inquire of my trainer why it is thought best that she gets some grain. I realize grain or not can be a controversial subject in the horse world. Well, name a subject that's not controversial in the horse world.

I feel so lucky that my horse's run in is about 20 feet from my front door and that I am able to interact multiple times each and every day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If you want to feed a supplement, I'd say this one is not one I'd choose. It is being marketed for ulcers.
Thank you for responding! Although it is marketed for ulcers it is also a supplement for gut support. Since I posted this thread I have put her on it, but I also plan on switching her in a few months to amiquell by horsetech which has a mix of herbs, probiotics, and prebiotics. I don’t think the equine elixir supplement will harm her and if I did truly suspect her to have ulcers and she was showing symptoms I would test before treating. The ingredients in most gut supplements I feel shouldn’t be feed to horses long term, and I thought equine elixirs seemed a safer and better option. I’m glad to have found the amiquell supplement which is made for gut support so I will probably be switching her to that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I know we are not supposed to link to other forums but if you go to tiktok and find devinoutwest, it has a good point to make about ulcers ...

In case this video link is allowed I will copy the address:

I’m not allowed on Tiktok but thank you for trying to help!

I wanted to ask, how much is a small amount? If I were in that situation, I would carefully inquire of my trainer why it is thought best that she gets some grain. I realize grain or not can be a controversial subject in the horse world. Well, name a subject that's not controversial in the horse world.

I feel so lucky that my horse's run in is about 20 feet from my front door and that I am able to interact multiple times each and every day.
She gets the smallest serving possible while still getting the appropriate amount so she gets enough vit/min and nutrients. I have and she doesn’t see a problem with grain and thinks that horses in work should get grain so that they are getting the proper nutrients, which I understand. I will be asking her about switching my mare from grain to a horsetech vitamin and mineral supplement. Lol, yeah pretty much everything is controversial in the horse world.
 

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Did you happen to see the movie unBranded where four recent grads took 12 mustangs from the Mexico border to Canada in around 6 months? About 3,000 miles. The horses ate only the forage available on the trip and remained in remarkable condition. One was ridden 15 to twenty miles each day, another carried a pack, and the third got to just rest? while walking along with the others. And then rotated. xfour riders.

When I was very young, our draft horses were fed corn on days they worked. And they worked hard with white salt crystallizing on their backs. Maybe they needed it. I don't know but it was the wisdom of the times.

But a lot of wisdom that has been carried forward from the past is not best for the horse. Old farrier exclaimed to me that horses had been wearing metal shoes for a hundred years and there was a reason!! I wanted to ask him about the transition from metal tractor tire to rubber tires which had many times the traction but did not.

So it is that when a person gives me an opinion on anything, I take it with a grain of salt unless a clear reason and explanation accompanies it.

May be a personality defect, but that's me.
 

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The first and only place I did full board, the owner fed dry alfalfa cubes twice a day to all the horses. When I suggested my horse had only been on grass pasture previously and I would like to feed grass hay, she glared at me and said "I've been feeding this way for thirty years and it works perfectly!" I didn't last long at that barn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
May be a personality defect, but that's me.
Not a defect, that’s just being smart. I always try and do my own research and if someone gives me an opinion on something I expect there to be a reason for it. I haven’t seen that movie, but it doesn’t surprise me. Horses have been doing great on grass for quite a while! I‘m not completely against grain as some brands are better than others and some horses do well being feed some (I don’t think you should ever feed it in high amounts) but since I have an easy keeper I think she should do fine with a good vit/min supplement.

The first and only place I did full board, the owner fed dry alfalfa cubes twice a day to all the horses. When I suggested my horse had only been on grass pasture previously and I would like to feed grass hay, she glared at me and said "I've been feeding this way for thirty years and it works perfectly!" I didn't last long at that barn.
Glad you got out of there! My trainer is great and I love her, all the horses go out as much as possible (day and night) and she gives them great care. In the end as the owner I can take change her diet but I’ve been hesitating for awhile. I wanted to find a really great vit/min supplement (I think I’m going with horse tech) and since she’s on a bit of a break from riding I think this is a good time to take her off the grain.
 

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I use Arizona Copper Complete from Horsetech. The average hay and forage around here tests out needing very close to that. California Trace also makes a supplement close to the same. I would use it if not for ACC.

But these are for minerals although they do have vitamine E which horses don't need if they have enough grass to store it in the fat for the winter. But on straight hay, they do need vitamin E as it's the first thing to go in the curing of hay.

I've really not looked into the vitamin area that much as my horse gets a wide wide variety of forage plus alfalfa, bermuda grass, and teff grass. Spoiled some might say but he loves it and so do I :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I use Arizona Copper Complete from Horsetech. The average hay and forage around here tests out needing very close to that. California Trace also makes a supplement close to the same. I would use it if not for ACC.
Just looked it up. I was looking at their high point daily vitamin and mineral supplement, but I’ll have to compare the two. My mare gets Timothy hay, and since it’s winter and there isn’t really any grass she gets a vitamin E supplement as well.
 

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I have read that vitamin E is stored in the fat and horses use that up in the winter. That is of course providing they have full access to green pasture when it is available. That, I've read, is where the wild horses get the vitamin E in the winter. But a little extra shouldn't hurt either.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have read that vitamin E is stored in the fat and horses use that up in the winter. That is of course providing they have full access to green pasture when it is available. That, I've read, is where the wild horses get the vitamin E in the winter. But a little extra shouldn't hurt either.
My mare’s pasture in the summer is ok, but this past summer it was really hot and the grass was hit hard, so I think she could do with the vitamin E supplement. Thanks for all the help!
 

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And the Arizona Copper Complete and I believe California Trace both have vitamin E and A in them. My horse and a lot of horses won't eat ACC straight. I mix about two to one Purina SafeChoice and ACC with just enough water to make the ACC stick to the SafeChoice pellets.

Takes a lot of vitamins to become toxic, doesn't take much to be deficient.
 
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