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I’ve been looking into putting my mare on the equine elixirs supplement Ulceraser. She doesn’t have a history of colic or ulcers( although she could have ulcers that I don’t know about), and wanted to put her on it as a precautionary measure. Has anyone here used it before? If so what did you think?
 

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The first question for any brand name supplement is: what is in it?
The second question is: why am I feeding it?
The third question is: is there any data (actual studies by actual scientists) to show the ingredients work in the dose provided, for what I want to treat? This is often very hard to come by, as supplement makers depend on the pocketbooks of the gullible worried horse owners who want to do the very best by their beloved steeds.

Most of the people I know who feed supplements have very little idea why they are doing it, and whether it works. As they say, the plural of anecdote is not data. Meaning, three people who say they thought they saw something happen when they fed it is not confirmation that it works.

I feed a forage balancer pellet year round to supply minerals and vitamins my hay and grass may not have. If I have a horse who has a demonstrated need for more, I try to figure out what that "more" is.

Horses get ulcers for reasons. Mainly because we add so much stress to their lives. Remember always that horses are designed to range slowly in small, stable groups while eating poor-quality forage almost constantly. Virtually everything we do to them and for them that isn't that, is some level of stressor. Focusing on removing or mitigating stressors (such as providing some kind of graze) is more effective than feeding nearly any kind of supplement.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The first question for any brand name supplement is: what is in it?
The second question is: why am I feeding it?
The third question is: is there any data (actual studies by actual scientists) to show the ingredients work in the dose provided, for what I want to treat? This is often very hard to come by, as supplement makers depend on the pocketbooks of the gullible worried horse owners who want to do the very best by their beloved steeds.

Most of the people I know who feed supplements have very little idea why they are doing it, and whether it works. As they say, the plural of anecdote is not data. Meaning, three people who say they thought they saw something happen when they fed it is not confirmation that it works.

I feed a forage balancer pellet year round to supply minerals and vitamins my hay and grass may not have. If I have a horse who has a demonstrated need for more, I try to figure out what that "more" is.

Horses get ulcers for reasons. Mainly because we add so much stress to their lives. Remember always that horses are designed to range slowly in small, stable groups while eating poor-quality forage almost constantly. Virtually everything we do to them and for them that isn't that, is some level of stressor. Focusing on removing or mitigating stressors (such as providing some kind of graze) is more effective than feeding nearly any kind of supplement.
I agree with you completely. I’m not a huge fan of most gut and ulcer supplements because they often have little conclusive evidence or really shouldn’t be fed to a horse long term. Of course, the best way to keep ulcers away and is through your horses lifestyle and not through a feed supplement. My horse is outside almost all the time with her friends except for in bad weather or when being fed. I try to keep things low stress for her and she gets only a small amount grain. I would love to have her go grain free, but trainer would rather her be on a grain since she is in work. It’s tribute feed, so it’s not a terrible grain. She can be a bit high strung sometimes, and I know that a lot of horses can have ulcers without us knowing, so I was considering putting her on it for a bit just to see how she reacted. I have done a lot of research on this supplement and I really like it and what’s in it, I’ll put the link to their website below if you or anyone else was interested in it.
Again, I completely agree with you about being cautious of supplements, and it’s one of the reasons I don’t feed a lot of them. (The only supplement she is on a currently is a flax supplement since it’s winter and the grass quality us poor)

 
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