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Hi, I was wondering if anyone here has a bachelor's in equine science or management? Or if not, does anyone here run a boarding facility....where did you get your knowledge/start up from?
 

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There have been various threads on both topics on the forum. Have you tried the search bar?

For what its worth - a degree in equine management (in my opinion) is not worth the money. Where would you work? Have you asked at local boarding barns? Do you plan on training horses? What is your riding level? In a lot of cases you may get more bang for your buck apprenticing with a well known local trainer or well known trainer.

As for boarding barns - I live in rural NW IL there are not a lot of boarding barns near me - and none have a barn manager. The owners do the managing and they have stable hands to muck stalls etc. So a degree would not help in my area.
 

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I agree with the above.

I a man in the UK and although things might be slightly different the basics are the same.

The equine degrees prove one thing and one thing only and that is that the holdermcan study and retain book knowledge.

The big wide world ismway different. You have to be able to multitask and that you will not learn in college.

I know that I would rather employ a person with hands on experience than one with book knowledge.
 

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Don't waste your money on equine management specifically. Yes, they'll give you book smarts, but most things with horses require "on the job" training. You'd be better off with a business degree and practical knowledge (an apprenticeship, volunteering at a rescue, etc.)

Working with horses is a fickle thing. 1 bad ride could permanently take you out of the game. Get kicked in the wrong place or fall off at the worst moment, and you could very realistically sustain serious injury. I once saw a man fall off and smash his head into the ground - bending his neck completely back. It wasn't career ending, but he was lucky. That accident could have easily resulted in his death or paralysis. Consider that many, many 'horse type' employers don't necessarily provide benefits as well.

Point is, you want something secure to fall back on in the event you DO get hurt, decide horses aren't for you or some other life change happens. A lot of people over-look the fact that regardless of what part of the horse industry they're in, it's still a business. You will still have customers, you will still need to understand budgeting for all of those expenses, etc. It also wouldn't hurt to educate yourself in what kinds of licensing you will need and various laws and such that come with being around horses or operating a boarding barn.

I'm in the same boat I wanted to add. There is nothing more in the world I want to do than have my own 'Pine Hollow' type stable. But, watching that accident is what really pointed out to me everything my family tried to warn me about. I'm currently looking for a decent lesson barn myself. 🙂
 

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Don't waste your money on equine management specifically. Yes, they'll give you book smarts, but most things with horses require "on the job" training. You'd be better off with a business degree and practical knowledge (an apprenticeship, volunteering at a rescue, etc.)
I agree with this 100%!

Friends who play polo and hire grooms and trainers, actively avoid hiring people with "equine management" degrees. The pros say that an equine mgmt degree too often gives the holder an inflated sense of worth. They are not veterinarians, but want to tell what they know about colic, or suspensory injuries, or nutrition. With little to back their opinions up.

These people prefer employees with practical skills and a business background, or a liberal arts background.

As one said, "How often do I want to be lectured on manure? Talk to me about literature, current events."
 
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