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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there has been talk of parasites developing immunity for years, but this article seems to sound the alarm rather urgently. I personally do my own fecals which have always been low since my horses have come on my property (though two of them had high worm counts when I first brought them here, but have remained low since them). I think a large grazing area helps, as does living outdoors instead of in stalls where they may end up eating their hay on top of their manure. I still deworm 2x a year per my vet's recommendation, but I wonder if I could to go annual deworming.

What are your thoughts? Is this an overreaction or are people really overdoing it with dewormers?


 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What we have is what we've got. Many people don't manage the environment nor do they have access to large pastures for turnout that would support better management. We also forget that as they age a horse develops immunity to parasites. That doesn't happen when we worm religiously increasing the burden as they age. I'm not saying never treat but treat as necessary. If your horse is in good condition and has a solid body score and low counts then the population is being managed by the horse and you. Consider not worming. Horse loses condition, body score drops, you can't effectively manage the environment then look at the most effective wormer the least number of times.
My horses always have very low FEC, but there are parasites that don't show up in those because we are counting eggs, not actual parasites, and some types of parasites don't shed many eggs if I understand correctly. However, I wonder if I could go to an annual deworming. All three of mine are in good condition at the moment and I am pretty good at staying on top of manure picking. They are also not going off-property right now so that probably helps.
 
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