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What we have is what we've got. Many people don't manage the environment nor do they have access to large pastures for turnout that would support better management. We also forget that as they age a horse develops immunity to parasites. That doesn't happen when we worm religiously increasing the burden as they age. I'm not saying never treat but treat as necessary. If your horse is in good condition and has a solid body score and low counts then the population is being managed by the horse and you. Consider not worming. Horse loses condition, body score drops, you can't effectively manage the environment then look at the most effective wormer the least number of times.
 

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Super Moderator
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I've pretty much stopped altogether 3 years ago. I was treating only the high shedders prior to that. With the lowered number of animals and management that is much easier to keep up with all are low at this point. All but one is over the age of 6 when immunity is strong. If the one under six shows signs of developing a heavy load then she'll be treated. As the others get on up in age they'll be watched as well. I don't have any that are considered aged at this point.


If you do decide to do as dog patch suggests then update the thread with what you find.
 
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