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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my wife and I just got these 2 paint horses, tabiano, and the other one is mostly solid. The solid doesn't seem to interested in the tabiano. But the tabiano is so buddy sour that he herds the solid where he wants him, basically needs to be right next to him every step of the way. When I put a halter on him he very quickly gets pushy and the only way I can control him is to keep walking him in a circle. I need some advice on how to work this out because I have my horses in a heard right now. We just moved here and still getting some things worked out like stalls so all our horses are together.
 

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Hi & welcome,

'buddy sour' is just a(silly, IMO) lable for horses particularly not wanting to leave their mates to go Work for a human. Often it is due to fear. So it doesn't sound like your paint is 'buddy sour', but he's just the dominant one of the pair.

If your horse is pushing you around on lead(I guess trying to treat you like his horsey mate) & you don't know how to deal with that, I really think you need hands on lessons, not just ask questions on a forum. We can't really just tell you all the basics, you can't learn 'horse' just thru text, even if we wrote books on it. But if you have any more specific questions, fire away!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The post about the half blind horse is a completely different horse bros. Thank you for all responses anyway. Do you think lunging would help? @loosie
 

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^Oh righto.

No, I don't know how lunging would be helpful, for either a pushy or a 'herdbound' horse. Some people do use/teach lunging for different reasons, but to me, it is just one more training exercise. It is an extension if you like, of teaching leading & ground driving skills - to teach/test how your horse responds to you at a distance. So you teach the horse to lead/drive well, up close first, then you gradually increase the distance until it becomes 'lunging'. Therefore, you need to get the leading going well first, before you think about starting to test that at a distance.
 

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I would separate them as soon as you can. Keep were they can see each other but are separate.
If you lunge make sure you are controlling the feet and not just running in circles.
I would start by disengaging the hind quarters moving the shoulders and backing them up. Send one direction, disengage and send the other way. stop back up, switch it up but keep it controlled and you rate the speed and changes.
practice walking, stopping, backing in hand. when you stop they stop. If not back them up and take few steps and repeat. I may even get a flag to help. He who moves the feet is boss lol Do not let him push past, stand firm and send him around you and back him up.
Clinton Anderson has a video on YouTube, Lunging for respect, it's pretty great to help with visual on timing and technique.

Good Luck!
 

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I'm curious, why would you separate the horses Janette? Just because one is quite attached to the other?

It sounds to me like this poster is starting from scratch - as in he doesn't have a lot of knowledge yet about training, so telling him to 'disengage' may go completely over his head, and telling him 'do not let him push past' when he has told us he has a prob with the horse being pushy & doesn't know what to do, is probably not helpful. This is one reason OP, why I really think you need hands on lessons, before you come looking for specific answers to questions online.
 

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I had a mare with this problem. But my ponies live on a track & she needed more than just hay to keep good weight. So, she would spend time in the middle on grass, while rest were still on the track.
Over time, on her own, she had to learn to go get water alone or wait until one of the others went for water.
1.5yrs later, I could lead her away from everyone, up n over the mountain, out of sight/sound & she was fine. Before, I could hardly lead her 50ft away, still in sight of the others, without a crop & circling & her screaming.
My point, small sessions away from others, where horse gets pleasant things, can work to get a buddy sour/herd bound horse over it. They lack confidence & trust.
 

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^Yep, minimal time/distance away, built gradually longer/further on success, to minimise/avoid causing her stress & fear - which will become very strongly linked to taking her away from her 'comfort zone' if you let it.

Secuono, one of my horses went the opposite way. I was diligent in taking him anywhere & everywhere, from the time I got him as a foal, with & without his mum, but in small, non-eventful ways, so that he could gain confidence going out with me. He was great, for the first few years... a bit too confident, as I found he'd leave his mates to go over the hills & far away - one morning I went to see him & he was missing!! Knowing the fences weren't wonderful on one side of this property, I drove around the block looking for him for ages, before eventually finding him in a neighbouring property, 2 hills away and across a major road(!) from his paddock & mates! When I went there & knocked on the door, the woman said 'yes, he's been coming here often for months, to visit with my mare - I often see him waiting to cross the road as I drive past on my way to work(!!! & she knew where he came from but hadn't thought to tell me before!!!).

Then when he was around 4 & a half, I sent him to a training establishment, for all of one week. This place was bad on many levels, but one problem it caused was my horse becoming an absolute raving loony when left alone - he could no longer stand not to be RIGHT THERE with his mates - even on the opposite side of a fence would stress him out & cause him to pace & scream! He was still OK going out with me, without his mates, but if you take them & leave him, he still goes off his nana! And he's now about 20yo & I've spent LOTS of time trying to gradually get him OK with it again. One week, many many years ago... I dread to think what they put the poor boy through to cause such major hangups!
 
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