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Discussion Starter #1
My three year old filly is currently on just pasture. I tried explaining to the BO that she needs more but she thinks that she is fine. What other type of supplements and feed should she have?
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That depends on the horse. Do you feel your horse is under/over weight? Does the horse have poor feet or skin issues? Why do you feel the horse needs a feed change? The more information you can give, the better the suggestions you'll get. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was told she is the perfect weight, and I guess she is. Her feet aren't the best though in terms of quality. And I recently moved her to this boarding place. I do believe that where she was before she was getting oats, but is there any nutritional value for horses with oats?
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Oats don't have many calories in them. They are mostly sugar. If her feet aren't as in as good of condition as you'd like, I'd recommend putting her on a hoof supplement. You won't see immediate results, but you should see improvement over time. I like Master's Hoof Blend or SmartHoof from Smartpak. What sort of riding are you doing and how heavy is her workload?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
We are mostly just trail and training at the moment, maybe one hour a day, three days a week. I could try a hoof supplement. Will she be okay not getting grain, because she's still growing.
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My gelding just turned four and has never had any supplements or grain. He's always been in great condition. He just went through a growth spurt (went from 15.3-16hh to 16.1-16.2hh in a couple of months) and is a little on the slim side, but he should fill out nicely in the next couple of months to match his new height.

My old BO used to say "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." In other words, if your horse isn't losing condition/weight and isn't too fat, there is no need to change anything in its diet.
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I'm not trying to be mean or snotty, but as the owner, it is your job to know what condition your horse is in. Learn how to do a Body Condition Score, and do it every week. Here's a video if you don't know much about it.

What's Your Horse's Body Condition Score? | Video | TheHorse.com

As far as what else she might need, that really depends on what she's getting from her pasture/hay. The best way to go is to have it tested. If you are in the US, your local extension agent should be able to help you with that. Many places are deficient in certain nutrients, but it's really hard to gauge what to add if you don't already know what's missing.
 

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Yes. Horses are meant and designed to eat grass. As long as The pasture isn't over grazed, it should be just fine. If you are worried about it, you can add to her feeding regiment. For example, my horse gets 1lb of Buckeye Grow and Win everyday. He is a hard keeper and this provides him with the additional vitamins/minerals and calories he needs to stay healthy. Another good thing you can feed them, if you are worried about calories, is beet pulp. It is loaded with fats that are good for horses and is easily digested. It's also fairly inexpensive. Just make sure you soak the living bejesus out of it. Beet pulp holds a ton of water and if not soaked properly, can cause choking. I use one part beet pulp, three parts water, and let is soak for at least 45mins. I usually let it sit while I ride.
 

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One resource you might want to check out (thank loosie for this one, I always do) is FeedXL.com. It doesn't cost very much, and can actually save you a bundle by telling you exactly what needs to be fed, and what doesn't.
 

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Hiya,

Sounds like your horse doesn't need anything more in her basic diet(no, grain is not generally necessary or desirable anyway). But it is likely that whatever her diet, she will be imbalanced &/or deficient in some nutrients, and that well balanced nutrition is important for hoof health, as well as the rest of the horse. Therefore I'd look at a low dose 'ration balancer' or other good quality, appropriate nutritional supplement. Check out Feedxl.com
 

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I was told she is the perfect weight, and I guess she is. Her feet aren't the best though in terms of quality. And I recently moved her to this boarding place. I do believe that where she was before she was getting oats, but is there any nutritional value for horses with oats?
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Oats don't have many calories in them. They are mostly sugar.

It sounds as if she doesn't need anything other than the food she is getting.

Bagheera - you are incorrect about the feed value of oats.

The feeding value of oats is fairly rich because it contains 7% to 9.5% digestible protein and sixty starch units (100 oats units). It is also fairly rich in fat (4.5% oil, from among the grains, second only to corn). Its individual nutrients are very easy to digest, does not cause digestive disorders and contain many other positive values in feeding horses.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Her body score is fine - she is in the perfect weight. She is in a 30 acre pasture with 5 other horses so over grazing isn't a problem. I just noticed that a lot of their horses that are on pasture are on the thin side. She hasn't been here long enough to lose weight, I just want to prevent it from happening at all if possible.

This is her, so you can see for yourself.






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Discussion Starter #13
Her body score is fine - she is in the perfect weight. She is in a 30 acre pasture with 5 other horses so over grazing isn't a problem. I just noticed that a lot of their horses that are on pasture are on the thin side. She hasn't been here long enough to lose weight, I just want to prevent it from happening at all if possible.

This is her, so you can see for yourself.






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Discussion Starter #14
Sorry for the double post! Stupid phone
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She's very pretty!

If the other horses are thin as a result of being on grass during winter, she should be fine on what she's getting. If they're usually on the thin side, I'd think about adding something to her diet in terms of calories.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
She's very pretty!

If the other horses are thin as a result of being on grass during winter, she should be fine on what she's getting. If they're usually on the thin side, I'd think about adding something to her diet in terms of calories.
Well they were in the smaller pasture for the winter, but I have noticed that they only seem to feed them once a day, about 4 flakes each. This is the only place that I could find on short notice as I found whip marks on my horse from her previous boarding place.
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You're right FoxHunter. I was thinking of grain/sweet feed when I posted that. Not sure why, but hey. It happens. Lol Here is a good article about the nutritional content on oats by Purina.

Barnmice.com/profiles/blogs/horse-nutrition-quick-facts-on

I'm sure you can always buy your own hay and bring it out for her as well. This all depends on what you, as a horse owner, feel that your horse needs.
 
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