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Alright, so I've got a broodmare that I bought in April of this year. Bred her on May 17th and she confirmed in foal 16 days later.

Well, I kinda jumped the gun on her and breeding (already had a stud set up and was deciding if I was gonna really haul her out and breed her and let her heat cycle kinda decide if I would.) Well, she popped into heat a lot sooner than I thought and I rushed her out and got her covered and she took fabulously.

The bad news, I hadn't had time to test her and did after her confirmation and she is n/PS1 and n/Gbd. Positive is that she seems to be asymptomatic(outside of the heavy sweating in the heat).

So how do I feed an asymptomatic pregnant mare? As in, what would people recommend for feed product? The last mare(5 panel neg) w/ foal on side I had fed Omolene 300, but I haven't fed current mare heavy enough (don't grain during the summer) and she did well on Strategy and alfalfa pellets, but I'm worried I might trigger her maybe? So I am just looking for the safest route. I've read good things about Ultium Growth and the Enrich feeds, but very open to suggestions!

Thanks!
~Bug

P.S. I have straight Orchard grass lined up for this winter.

Duchess, when I first got her.
Duchess.jpg

Stud she is bred to.
ChampsSweetIllusion.jpg
 

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What's his panel test show? I'd be more concerned for the foal's health.

I have had PSSM carriers and I've fed them the same way I've fed any broodmare. If they were in heavy training or competition, then I might go a low starch route, like Purina Wellsolve LS. I have not had any trouble at all with my past mares who carried the PSSM1 and have not had a GBED carrier or affected horse.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The stallion is 5 panel negative, so in terms of getting any homozygous traits, the foal is in the clear. Fortunately GBED is a recessive disease so generally, they are non-affected like PSSM1, which is a dominant gene. GBED is fatal in homoz form.

Just didn't want to somehow get her going with the disease if feeding her too much sugar is an issue. She isn't a working horse, just a broodmare at this point, so exercise is not a big factor.
 
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