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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I'm brand new here and this is my first post. I've recently been given a 19 year old 1/2 Arab- 1/2 Tennessee Walking horse gelding by my grandmother who could no longer care for him. He'd gotten very fat before I got him and must have foundered even though he's never been lame. His coffin bone has rotated so much I'm afraid it's about to break through. His weight is good now. I'm feeding him mature grass hay and would like to add a pound or two of beet pulp, 1/2 cup of corn oil, and a vitamin of some sort (looking for suggestions) to his diet. I lost my job right after i got the horse:? so my budget is tight, tight...but I still want to do everything I can to take excellent care of him so his life is long and happy. There's a lot of sentimental value here since my grandmother gave him to me and his sire was my lesson horse when I was a kid. I love this sweet ole guy.
 

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Do you think that is a good feeding plan for my type of horse? So far the only beet pulp I've been able to find has molasses in it so I guess I'd better keep looking, unless you don't think its enough to worry about.
 

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Has he been xrayed to see if he is actually rotated??

Beet pulp up to about 6lbs daily... depending on where you live on what vitamin/mineral supplements you can get locally or have to order.

you might also soak his hay to remove the sugars from it
 

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I'm in agreement with Peggysue here. You need to eliminate all sugars from the diet, and stay on a regular trimming schedule.
 

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I'll keep looking for sugar free beet pulp. Speedi beet would probably be good. His hay is not rich at all because it was baled so late in the season. Some of it is so mature its just like straw so I add that to his bedding. Can I let him have midsummer grass or should he be off that forever now. I'm afraid xrays are out of the question right now, but from looking at the bottom of his hooves they must have rotated. I can see distinct ridges ridges on the bottoms of both of them. Thank you for your help. Its nice not to feel alone in this situation.
 

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just because hay was cut late does not mean the sugars are low in it...

You could always get the beet pulp with molasses and rinse it although honestly the minamal molasses used to keep the dust down prob won't bother him... I would be more concerned about grains

early spring grass and drought grass tends to be higher in sugars then any other
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I cut out his sweet feed completely. I was only giving him a couple of cups a day anyway. I'm worried about his hay. We did have a dry summer but not sure if it qualifies as drought hay. may have to rise it. not fun in the winter.
 

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Just soak the beet pulp with extra water, and then pour the extra water out and rinse the beet pulp and it will take out the molasses. It's only used to keep the dust down as someone else mentioned, so it is very minimal. Depending on where you live, triple crown and LMF both offer great feeds for foundered horses. LMF offers low carb complete and triple crown has safe starch and another product that has almost no sugar in it for foundered horses or horses with cushings. I wouldn't worry too much about about late pasture grass hay, the sugar level is going to be minimal.
 
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