The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Soon my horse and I will go to our first show.

Can someone please explain to me what to expect...?

For example patterns, or "rules" from the time you enter the ring, to the time you leave and everything in between. For example lining up and going back into line after you preform your individual pattern.

Anything else...? How does everything usually work?

Maybe some practice patterns...(not sure if theres a thread with patterns somewhere on here...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,679 Posts
Here's a website with oodles of practice patterns: Showmanship Practice Patterns
Most look kind of tricky (as I skim and see lots of loops and serpentines), but there are a few fairly simple ones. Do practice at home, but working the pattern and memorizing it.

As far as ring advice, firstly don't be the first one in the ring if you can help it. Really small shows sometimes let entrants sort themselves into the order they want, but most do call number by number. Being first (or last) to go helps you stick in the judge's mind, but if you're unconfident or unsure watching a couple of people run the pattern can help.

Usually the pattern starts with a cone. When the horse in front of you leaves the starter cone to do the pattern, you can take your place there and square your horse up for his run. The caveat to this is if the pattern will bring the horse before you back to the starter cone for some reason... then wait until he's done with the cone to take your place.

Even at this point, remember your quarter method. You always lead from the left, but if you're standing still for any length of time, be quartering according to the judge's position just like at inspection. This holds for the post-pattern lineup as well.

When the judge is ready for you to begin your pattern, he/she will acknowledge you with a nod, perhaps waving you forward. It's generally good etiquette to nod back, then crossover to the left side if you need to, and start your pattern. The judge is looking for a solid entry -- straight lines, smooth transitions, responsive back-ups, pivots, and square-ups, and a horse that neither charges past or lags behind the handler, on a tidy but relaxed lead. Smile, and be confident! If you aren't, fake it until you make it! Above all, have fun! :D

After the inspection portion of the pattern, finish out or return to the lineup as the pattern requires. I usually look back over my shoulder at the judge 2-3 times at this point, but I was taught old-school. Ideally, the looking back shows respect for the judge, and according to some helps straighten your line (my lines get crooked when I look back... so not fair :p). When you get back to the lineup, tack yourself onto the end a safe distance from the next horse. There will probably be a ring steward of some description to guide you as to where to stand. In the post-pattern lineup, set your horse square and continue to follow the quarter system. You are still being judged, and your performance in the lineup can be a big bonus at some shows.

That got really long (sorry, I ramble when it comes to G&S/Halter :oops:), hope it answered some of your questions about what to expect in the class. Best of luck, have fun, and enjoy the show! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
Great advice from Scoutrider. Be prepared for anything. Some shows will have you line up, others will not. Know your pattern.....don't learn it from the people who go before you as they don't always do it correctly. I always take everything verbatum from what is printed on the pattern sheet. Look closely at what side of the cone you and your horse should be on. Look closely at where your "points" are (stop, back, set up for judge, begin trot, etc.). Practice the pattern without your horse and make sure you are confident in exactly what you need to do. Once the horse in front of you leaves the starting cone, get set to go, have your horse ready, and watch for the judge's nod to begin your pattern. Things don't always go exactly like you want, but look and move with confidence throughout the entire pattern. A part of Showmanship is about you presenting your horse. If you look and move confidently, that covers up for some of the little mistakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
What classes are you planning to enter, and what kind of show are you going to? Those two details would help me give advice. =)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What classes are you planning to enter, and what kind of show are you going to? Those two details would help me give advice. =)
Just a small showmanship class (and maybe a halter class for practice).:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
At appaloosa shows, they usually run the halter classes first, and then showmanship. It is good etiquette to be at the gate and ready to show while they are placing the class ahead of yours. The advice scoutrider and ridehorses99 gave is EXCELLENT! I would add that eye contact with the judge is a biggie. You should ALWAYS know where the judge is. (If there are multiple judges, the one doing inspection is the one you keep your eyes on.) I would also add that if you are backing your horse toward the judge, keep your eyes on him, not the horse. This helps you back straight.

Oh, and when you do a pattern, make sure you leave enough room so you don't knock the cones over.

@Scoutrider, when I leave the judge, I turn my head but don't look all the way back. That way, the judge knows I'm keeping my attention on him, but my lines don't get crooked =)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
i have a question. when lining up with a judge do u want the horses head facing the judge or do u want the judge to be able to see his whole body length wise? thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I think theres someone in there that directs it, but maybe its posted ahead of time...?

Good question. I hope someone can answer it.

Also I have another 2 questions: How do you go back into line?

Do you back up, go all the way around behind the other horses and go back to your spot, or do you just go to the end of the line?

How do you know what to do?

And the last one... If you place, do you just stand there and wait until 1st 2nd and 3rd place are said, go in front of the judge, or behind the judge? Or something else?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
Okay, one at a time, LOL.

First, when you line up before a class, it's butt to the rail unless otherwise specified. When you set up for inspection, generally you move straight toward the judge, so you stop head-on. Again, this is unless otherwise specified. I had one pattern where you had to stop at the cone, and the judge was to the side. After you're done with your pattern, you move to the rail. It really helps if you let someone else go first, so you have a point of reference. But there are two ways to go. Sometimes you line up on the rail where you started out. In that case, you line up so that if the class were to run again, it would be in the same order. (Does that make sense?) Other times you line up close to where the pattern ends. Just put your horse next in line, or have a ring steward direct you. In any case, this is also butt to the rail.

Okay, so I think that might have answered the first three questions.

At local shows, when you place you leave the arena. If your number didn't get called, you leave when they stop placing. But no matter what, keep showing until you are outside the pen.

A lot of times, you can ask the judge(s) a question before the class starts if something is not clear to you. And if you do have to pass the judge and (s)he is standing in front of you, pivot your horse until you have a clear path and then walk on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
After you're done with your pattern, you move to the rail. It really helps if you let someone else go first, so you have a point of reference. But there are two ways to go. Sometimes you line up on the rail where you started out. In that case, you line up so that if the class were to run again, it would be in the same order. (Does that make sense?) Other times you line up close to where the pattern ends. Just put your horse next in line, or have a ring steward direct you. In any case, this is also butt to the rail.
Thank you. The information was really helpful, but....I do need to clarify one thing:D

Would I be backing my horse up into the same spot, or go a far distance around the back of the other horses into my spot (on the left rein)?

And I mad one part of the quote red. Can you clarify what you mean there?

Sorry, I'm very new to this!:oops:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
Usually the other horses are pretty close to the rail, and you don't go behind or in front of them. You go to the end of the line.

As for the end of the pattern, sometimes the pattern is a straight line or a line with a 90 degree turn that leaves you quite a distance away from where you started. In that case, the post-pattern lineup is usually at the far end of the pattern, on the rail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
There is generally a Ring Steward that will help direct you on where to go once you finish your pattern. If there is no Ring Steward at the show, the printed pattern sometimes tells you where to go after you have finished.

One additional thing I forgot to mention that many beginners mess up on....when you make the approach to set up your horse for the judge's inspection, always walk or jog (depending on the pattern) your horse in a line directly in front of the judge. In other words, don't walk/jog yourself in a line directly in front of the judge but walk/jog your horse on that line. When you set up, the horse should be directly in front of the judge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
Ridehorses, you are really reminding me of some of my beginner's mistakes, LOL. I did that for about a month until someone pointed it out to me. That was before I went to a show horse trainer. All I had at the time was my game horse trainer who is excellent at what she does.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
There is generally a Ring Steward that will help direct you on where to go once you finish your pattern. If there is no Ring Steward at the show, the printed pattern sometimes tells you where to go after you have finished.

One additional thing I forgot to mention that many beginners mess up on....when you make the approach to set up your horse for the judge's inspection, always walk or jog (depending on the pattern) your horse in a line directly in front of the judge. In other words, don't walk/jog yourself in a line directly in front of the judge but walk/jog your horse on that line. When you set up, the horse should be directly in front of the judge.
Thats good to know. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
thanks!!! but when you say " line up the horse infront of the judge. do mean so the judge can see the horse length wise? or so the head is the first thing they see. i still dont really know.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top