The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I decided to finally buy my first horse, and I really want a Fjord since they've always been my favourite.
But problem is, I live in a very hot country, the average temperature during summer (aprox June-September) is 90F/30C degrees, and during the season's peak it can get to 100F/40C degrees. I've read some horror stories online about Fjord owners whose Fjords nearly died of a heatstroke, since they aren't used to hotter enviourments. Is that true? Will I take a huge risk if I decide to get one?
My future horse will live in a pasture all year round, so no ceiling fans or anything. Buying a cooling blanket/fly sheet (whichever works best) is no big deal, if that's the solution.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,438 Posts
If they are acclimated to it and they aren't obese then following your common sense and providing a fan, shade, fresh (cool if possible - put trough in shade) water and not working your horse in extreme temps and there should be no problems. if they have something like cushings and a heavy coat you may want to shave them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,502 Posts
You shouldn't have a problem, provided you keep your Fjord healthy and he/she has water and shelter and you don't over exert them on exceptionally hot days (that can be said of any horse, though). I follow The Norwegian Fjord Horse group on facebook and many of them have fjords in hot climates ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
I live in New Mexico where the heat in the summer time can be between 90 and 100 several days in a row and we have a couple Fjord enthusiasts across the state here, including in one of the hotter areas of the state. I don't know how they keep their horses all the time but it seems like the horses are always thriving. We have a lot of Icelandic horse breeders here too oddly enough and those horses do really well also so I don't think temps really matter much in regard to breed. They aren't worked on super hot days (or are worked minimally). Most are not grazed on grass pasture as that is not usually available here and if it is it's not for long so many are kept on dirt lots with plenty of shade, water, and trees. Due to our high temps (which makes most barns absolutely stifling in the summer time no matter how much ventilation and fans you have going) a lot of horses aren't kept in traditional barns and stalls here and many are kept in turnouts or large pastures and do just fine. I have seen a lot of them clipped in the summer though so that may be something you have to do depending on the horse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
535 Posts
I live in a hot humid climate all year round, 35 C + half the year with 90% humidity.
It truly depends on the horse as in individual, some handle it better than others, but taking all the precautions will help immensely.
We have a halflinger so similar-ish to a fjord in body shape etc, who handles our climate better than my stock horse who is bred for harsh weather :icon_rolleyes:

So I wouldn't let that stop you, just be aware of their vital signs and see how they're going throughout the days, you'll notice pretty quickly if they're struggling and need extra help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,129 Posts
Any horse can get heat stroke if not managed carefully in hot weather. This is more of a risk with horses that are in heavy work or competition. Or if you have a bully horse in the herd that aggressively runs the other horses off- someone i knew had a horse die from heatstroke due to this.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top