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All right, so my mare Kayo and I recently won a 'rodeo royalty' competition and I'm now the Queen for this riding club. It's a really small club, and there isnt much involved with it. But I overheard the director talking and she wants us to represent at our towns CPRA rodeo. The grand entry we did at our show, Kayo got the spot next to the American flag and it was a reallyyy windy day, so the flag was flapping. She would NOT stand still and was super nervous. Even when the flag was going around the arena she was prancing. I dont want to show up to the big rodeo with a horse thats gunna mess everyone else up! It would also be nice to have her able to carry a flag. Just in case i get called on to do it ;) So i guess im just needing some ideas to get her used to the noise around her, and on her?! :) Thanks in advance!
 

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We have had to 'flag train' all of the 4-H horses. They lead about every parade around here. They carry the American, Oklahoma, Chickasaw Nation and usually the POW and 4-H flags. Some of these horses wanted absolutely nothing to do with a flapping flag. We now have Chamber of Commerce officials call our County Extension office to see if the club can lead their parades. I think they did 4 or 5 Christmas Parades last year and several rodeo parades and grand entries. We always do our own Veteran's Day Parade.

We start out every new horse the same way:

Like everything else 'new' that we introduce a horse to, we try to do it at the end of a long ride -- usually an all day trail ride if we can. We never try to do anything new when a horse is fresh if we can possibly help it. It takes much longer to desensitize a 'fresh' horse than a tired one.

We start out in the big round pen or main arena with one of the old standbys or a person on foot carrying the flag. We always follow the flag and do not let it come toward the new horse. If you follow the new thing long enough, almost any horse will become OK with it.

When a horse will follow a flag from a distance of 6 or 8 feet, we start riding the new horse between the flag and a fence. We go back and forth and back and forth until the horse is willing to stand still and rest between the flag and the fence.

Then, we have the flag-horse or person on foot walk about 10 feet from the fence and ride the new horse along-side between the flag and the fence.

In about an hour, we can usually carry a flag on the horse. We always carry the flag on the rider's right side and ride with a fence on the left for quite a while.

We go through the whole procedure again the next time. Each time, it takes less and less time for the horse to decide it is OK.
 

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We did it(:) She handled it like a champ!
 

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Congrats on yall's achievement. You both look so patriotic. Well done!:)
 
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