The Horse Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have heard that by floating a horses teeth they are less likely to have attitudes and that it will make there mouth more comfortable. Is this true and what are the specifics in what "floating teeth" actually does? Also how do you know of your horse needs to have this done? Thanks
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,153 Posts
Horse's dentine grows all the time until they are very old. During this time, the horse's teeth can develop hooks, waves and other problems and this will cause uclers way, way back in their mouth which you can't see without a speculum and a light which the vet will show you. Properly floated teeth make for a happy, healthy horse that will accept & seek out bit contact so much better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,913 Posts
For a horse's teeth to be effective, they need to basically be a flat grinding surface. The front teeth, incisors, will nip and tear, while the premolars and molars will grind side to side. The problem with most horse teeth is they loose the flat contact with the opposing tooth or one arcade grows at a faster rate or wears down faster than the opposing one. The goal in floating is to restore that flat surface so he can chew and digest food efficiently. It will also allow the lower jaw to slide forward when the horse breaks at the poll. If the lower jaw can not move forward, you will have resistance and perhaps a bad attitude from the pain it can inflict. You can also have sharp points, teeth that are elongated and have a razor sharp point, that dig into the cheek again causing pain and resistance. That's an oversimplification of your question but your best bet is to find a good equine dentist vet (they must be a licensed vet to sedate your horse which is a whole other topic) who will explain the process and allow you to feel and monitor the work he is performing.

There is one train of thought that horses don't need their mouths looked at until they are in their teens but that's simply not true. Biting a 2 year old for the first time is when they should first be looked at. A young horse has very soft and often sharp teeth. Their mouths can be worse at this age than any other time. Signs that you might need some work done are dropped weight, dropping feed, quidding hay (wads of chewed hay that they typically spit out in their water), training issues or change in attitude towards work, not getting one the bit, bridling and unbridling issues, head tossing.... The list is long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Horses teeth can have just the slightest little sharp edge and it can cause discomfort/pain when eating or holding a bit in their mouth. Floating is just filing down those sharp edges.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,653 Posts
I have my horses checked yearly my 26 year old is checked every 6 months has issues that need fixing. Sometimes the other two get teeth done every year sometimes every other year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks I think I will be looking more into this! And hopefully can get my horses done:) Thanks!
Posted via Mobile Device
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top