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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My colt needs his first set of shots (he is 6 months old), I will be calling the vet monday but was wondering what I should ask for/expect? :)

Also, I KNOW the little guy needs to be dewormed big time (I will also talk to the vet), what dewormer and schedule do you recomend to help him get rid of everything safely and properly?

He also needs a coggins and if I decide to move him to a new barn I'd like to have the deworming started/finished (If we move we will be moving March 1st) before he is stressed even more! (potential barn owner knows about the worming concerns though incase it takes longer than a month to get him healthy)

Thanks in advance!
 

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When you call the vet tell them that you have a colt that needs his first shots and that he needs to be wormed. Usually older horses can be on a couple of different schedules. Most are on a paste which is every 3 months which works pretty good you just need to make sure that you change brands every time so that they don't get used to it. Colts can also be different but most that I have dealt with is once every month then on a regular schedule after that. It is kinda up to you what is easiest and works best for the barn that you move him to. With him being a colt if you are going to have him gelded know would be the perfect time. Remember that once gelded they are still fertile for 30 days after. Some barns have to make special arrangments for colts. GOOD LUCK.
 

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Yep, tell your vet that you have a 6 month old colt that needs to be vaccinated. He will likely ask you about whether or not your mare was vaccinated while pregnant. Likely he will recommend EEE, WEE, WNV, Tetanus, Strangles, Influenza, EHV and Rabies. Boosters will need to be given in about a month too. Then vaccinations again at 1 year of age.

Deworming should have been started on this guy months ago. Your vet will likely again ask about what kind of deworming program your mare is on and what kind of situation the foal is in. But it's likely that he will recommend a monthly or every other month deworming program until your colt is 1 year of age. But be sure to ask him about the parasite resistance issues with fenbendazole, pyrantel and ivermectin to ensure that you are not missing either ascarids or strongyles. Ascarids are showing resistance to both pyrantel and ivermectin and strongyles are resistant to fenbendazole in 90+% of the areas tested in the US (and the world) and to pyrantel in about 50% of areas tested.

Once your colt is over 1 year of age, you need to assess the situation via reviewing management practices at the stable where you keep him and have a fecal egg count performed well after the spring deworming to see what kind of parasite egg shedding he does. Based on that information, you and your vet can plan an appropriate deworming program.

Between now and then I would highly recommend that you read the articles archives on www.thehorse.com about parasites and deworming and then watch the webinar with the newest deworming recommendations that was posted in June 2009. The old every 2-3 months rotating dewormers is no longer recommended by the people who specialize in studying GI parasites of horses. That type of deworming program isn't effective any longer and will only lead to heavier parasite burdens and faster development of resistance to all the deworming drugs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks!

Heres hoping we can see the vet ASAP :D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Remember that once gelded they are still fertile for 30 days after. Some barns have to make special arrangments for colts. GOOD LUCK.
Yep, thanks.

If I move barns there is a colt the same age that (with a little luck) they get along and they can live together outside most of the time! (he also will be a gelding) Plus, the barn owner has expereince with colts and stallions and the whole gelding process so I'm sure she will be a HUGE help when the time comes!
 

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Between now and then I would highly recommend that you read the articles archives on www.thehorse.com about parasites and deworming and then watch the webinar with the newest deworming recommendations that was posted in June 2009. The old every 2-3 months rotating dewormers is no longer recommended by the people who specialize in studying GI parasites of horses. That type of deworming program isn't effective any longer and will only lead to heavier parasite burdens and faster development of resistance to all the deworming drugs.
100% dependent on what the fecal count shows. For horses that shed over 500 or are in high risk situations, it is still recommended to perform a more frequent rotational worming.

I just dug out my issue of 06/09 Stable Managment this morning to show to a new boarder.
 

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100% dependent on what the fecal count shows. For horses that shed over 500 or are in high risk situations, it is still recommended to perform a more frequent rotational worming.

I just dug out my issue of 06/09 Stable Managment this morning to show to a new boarder.
Yes, it is dependant on the fecal egg count, they do still recommend more frequent deworming for heavy shedders but not the "just do it very 2 months" program. The experts recommend 4 times a year in that situation focusing on the time of year when you have moderate weather and still discontinuing the dewormings when you have extremes of temperature. (For the south that means not deworming during the summer and for the north that means not deworming during the winter.) And being sure that you are deworming at appropriate time based upon the activity of the last drug used. For example, you would deworm in spring with moxidectin/praziquantel. Then in 3 months with pyrantel. Then a month later with ivermectin and again 2 months later with ivermectin/praziquantel for your final deworming before the weather conditions become too extreme for parasite reinfection rates to be a problem.

In these high shedding horses you don't want to use moxidectin and then deworm again in 8 weeks with fenbendazole or pyrantel becuase you aren't going to be doing anything. And you don't want to wait a full 8 weeks after using either fenbendazole or pyrantel because that is going to leave this horse shedding eggs for a full month before you deworm again, thus continuing the cycle of contamination for pastures.

The "just deworm every 2-3 months rotating dewormers" simply isn't a good way to do it. The plan needs to take into account weather, pasture/stable management, the horse's own resistance to parasites and the way that each drug works.

This is per the experts in the field of equine parasitology. I wrote a veterinary medical assoc. approved article on this topic this past summer. ;)
 

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My vet only gave my little guy three way, botulism and influenza, he's getting three installments over three months. He started at 10 months.

He got wormed around the time he was weaned. When I got him we gave him a deworming treatment, as the vet thought he had worms. Since, he just gets the regular rotation with my mare. He'll be a year in March. I just got an egg count, and it looks like he will need to be dewormed 2-4x a year, and get regular retesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you Ryle.

This is very good information. I'd like to trust my vet 100% and go with what they tell me but I found it never hurts to be well informed; there is so much new and updated information to learn and study. I like to know the what and why plus understand exactly what my vet is talking about.

Thanks again for the information.

The vet I am using is a Quakertown Veterinary Clinic here in Pa. They are also the big-name horse emergency hospital for horses in the area as well as the routine care so I hope they will guide me in the right direction!
 

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Just remember to booster all your vaccines properly. I feel that you are a little behind in starting vaccines at 6 months. Be careful moving him until his vaccine series is finished. Last thing you need is a sick baby. Good Luck!
EEE,WEE, T, FLu/Rhino (4 months, 5 months, 6 months)
WNV (5 months, 6 months)
Rabies (6 months)

Dont forget your strangles if you are moving your colt - ask for the intranasal - extra cost but much better (less reaction)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just remember to booster all your vaccines properly. I feel that you are a little behind in starting vaccines at 6 months. Be careful moving him until his vaccine series is finished. Last thing you need is a sick baby. Good Luck!
EEE,WEE, T, FLu/Rhino (4 months, 5 months, 6 months)
WNV (5 months, 6 months)
Rabies (6 months)

Dont forget your strangles if you are moving your colt - ask for the intranasal - extra cost but much better (less reaction)
Don't worry, I will make sure I follow through with the booster's properly.

The colt was given to me, I had NO control over what shots he got when until now.

He needs to have the vaccine series finished before he can go anywhere. He also needs his coggins and will be getting the stangles (I will make sure I ask for the intranasal).

All the vets that I have delt with just give the shots then the boosters in whatever amount of time...:-| none give at 4 months, 5 months, and 6 months that I know of...

My game plan is:
Get the vet out early next week, get the shots and get him started on a deworming plan.
I am hoping I can move him around March 1st (by which time he should be able to get his boosters done too).

I talked to the potential new barn Friday and I did mention to her where he was coming from, the situation I'm in, and that a 30-or so day quarantine SHOULD happen before I put him out with another horse or put him near another horse...

At the end of September when I first started going around this barn there was a horse all alone in a shed... I didnt think anything of it... however it was brought to my attention in a later conversation with the barn owner that the horse was leaving soon... He was just there to be quarantined/recover for a month before going to a new barn... HE HAD STANGLES :shock:.

The barn sees a lot of horses from New Holland, and I felt I needed to stress this with the potential barn, I would feel TERRIBLE if my horse brought a cold with him, or worse (even though he is very healthy besides the lack of vet care, farrier care, and deworming that is....) The barn owner of the potential barn was thrilled with my honesty is said not to worry, we can find a place to put him away from everyone else for a while :D. (She was just going to put him in with a colt his own age at first till I mentioned the above)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
By the way, anyone reading this thread...

This colt was given to me, however it is going to cost me
$400 or so in vet care and deworming to get him on track and another $400-$500 (atleast) to register him with the ApHC (I need my memebership too). Add to that an expensive first farrier visit becuase he never had his feet done and he picks them up ok but the first time is sure to bring challenges.

Plus, when the time comes, he still needs to be gelded! :-o Yay! (I can't wait, I want to assist with the surgery haha)

no horse is 'free' :wink:

..but I'm cool with that, I am really fond of my fugly baby!
 

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**Flyinsolow** I did not mean to sound like you havent done what you needed to for your colt. Sorry if I offended you. Can you not do your vaccines yourself to save money? I work as a technician at a veterinary office and have done so for the past 10 years and know that what they charge is crazy. I just wanted to make sure you get your baby off to a good start. I had to deal with one of my WB babies getting sick... stubborn sniffles that just wouldnt go away. I had to treat him for 10 days with naxcel (crazy expensive antibiotic on a large colt) and xylexis (immunomodulator which ran me $400 cost). So after paying a nice price for my colt, shipping him across the country and then treating his sniffles I was broke. :) I wish you only the best for you and your colt!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
**Flyinsolow** I did not mean to sound like you havent done what you needed to for your colt. Sorry if I offended you. quote]

Oh, in no way did you offend me! And I appreciated your advice a lot. I just wanted to be clear that I am trying to do what I can with what I have at the moment... I didnt have much control over what happened to him before this and really I have a lack of control now becuase I'm attempting to not make anyone angry with me.:oops:
You see; I am between switching barns, the barn I am currently at has no idea I'm moving and I fear when I do have to tell them it isnt going to be pretty :? so I need to get everything lined up so I can make it happen as quickly and smoothly as possible!

Rabies must be done by a vet anyway, and I need to have a coggins done (by a vet) too so he might as well give them all. Money isnt a HUGE problem, and its nice to save... but It will be worth having the vet do it.
Then the I'm on the charts at Quakertown so if anything happens they will accept my horse =)
 

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By the way, anyone reading this thread...

This colt was given to me, however it is going to cost me
$400 or so in vet care and deworming to get him on track and another $400-$500 (atleast) to register him with the ApHC (I need my memebership too). Add to that an expensive first farrier visit becuase he never had his feet done and he picks them up ok but the first time is sure to bring challenges.


no horse is 'free' :wink:

..but I'm cool with that, I am really fond of my fugly baby!
This is sooo true. No horse is ever free. My best friend was given an older Paint [email protected] 17 years old. She'd been in a pasture with two other buddies for years--the others had foundered, colicked, whatever and died (neglect). Libby now has a wonderful home with my friend, who makes gobs of money and has spent thousands by now (3 years) on all sorts of things. But Libby is in great health now, and my friend wouldn't trade her for the earth, moon and stars!!
Good for you, and best of luck with your boy!!
 

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Just remember to booster all your vaccines properly. I feel that you are a little behind in starting vaccines at 6 months. Be careful moving him until his vaccine series is finished. Last thing you need is a sick baby. Good Luck!
EEE,WEE, T, FLu/Rhino (4 months, 5 months, 6 months)
WNV (5 months, 6 months)
Rabies (6 months)

Dont forget your strangles if you are moving your colt - ask for the intranasal - extra cost but much better (less reaction)
Actually our office says 6 months is recommended for first series now. Maternal antibodies can interfer prior to that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Actually our office says 6 months is recommended for first series now. Maternal antibodies can interfer prior to that.

Is that assuming the mare had all her shots?
 

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my vet told me not to vaccinate before 6 months. my little guy didnt get trimmed untill about 5 months.

It cost me only $60-70 per series (3 series.) And wormers shouldnt be that much. The most expensive part is gelding.

If you have any questions about anything I did PM me anytime.

I would suggest you not give your own shots to a horse who has never had them. He could have a reaction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
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