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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So at the horse shelter were I'm volunteering is a mare, for about 1 year, with very strange front legs. I google it and found an article about Fracture Of The Sesamoid Bones

here is a picture that seems to show exactly the same condition as this mare that I'm talking about.

FRACTURE-OF-THE-SESAMOID-BONES.jpg


Here are some pictures, she must gain a lot of weight but she is way better than how she came to us. The pictures are from this summer so in 6 month she gained some weight. She has 15 + years old and she is just a pasture ornament now.

She seems to be fine, she doesn't show any signs of pain. I guess that the injury is healed now.

For me it's pretty obvious that in the right foot she may have a sesamoid bone fracture but the left foot seems to be ok. Can it be a fracture only in the right foot? Or she is just **** footed with a leg injury in one foot?

She was seen by a doctor but the doctor decided that she is fine as she is so no treatment. I have no idea if the doctor gave her a diagnostic and couldn't find out.


What do you think about it?

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This one is more recent than the others, is from november.
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DISCLAIMER << GRAPHIC >>
here is a video of her in the first day when she came to us. here she is on her way to the shelter. Now she doesn't limp like that, she walks pretty normal.
Rita - Episodul 1 pe Tare.ro
 

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I honestly have no experience with it, but from the picture and article it sure sounds like the sesamoid fracture fits the bill.

I just have to say though, bless your shelter for taking her in. The video was awful to watch, the poor dear in such bad shape with all those wounds and desperately reaching for that bread. It was heartbreaking to see. You have done a very good thing.
 

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Poor girl : ( She looks like a sweet horse.

Someone actually rode the horse in the first picture? : /
 

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How strange that both she and the horse in the example picture seem to have the same injuries, even down to the scrapes on the hip bone and butt. The world is full of odd coincidences. I think you probably hit the nail right on the head as far as the fracture. I am not sure but I would guess that maybe her tendons on the left front were stretched out a bit as a result of carrying most of her weight on that foot alone while her other leg healed. With the amount of injuries she has, I wonder if maybe she fell down a steep hill or maybe got hit by a car. That poor girl, Bless you guys for taking her in and giving her a much better quality life.
 

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Do you know how she got all beat up? Looks like an amazing story, like she was attacked by an animal or something. I think you are right on with the fracture. Such a sweet looking girl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@ShutUpJoe: She is a sweet horse even if she bites and kicks. We didn't even try to fix those issues because of her health condition. I guess that she will remain with those behavioral issues all her life. We can handle her this way with a little caution and we don't want to stress her even more than she may be.
I really don't know nothing of the first picture, I took it from the internet for exemplification. But yes, that horse looked like he had been even rode in that condition.

@Indyhorse: yes, this diagnostic is the only one I found that it seems to be more accurate. But I thought that she must have the same condition at her both front legs. But I guess that it can be only in one leg.

@Honeysuga and smrobs: Well I know where the signs are from and I can imagine how she suffered the injury. She was a carriage horse, she pulled heavy weights all her life. Even if she was so thin and starved the former owners put her at work in this condition. So I guess that because of her wick condition she couldn't pull the carriage full with steel (the gipsies from here sell steel, this is their only income). If she couldn't do her job they beat her up in order to keep her moving so her feet couldn't take it more. So basically she was forced to pull the carriage until she couldn't move it any more even with the beatings.

I saw a mare that was put to work and because she couldn't do it more was forced until her ligaments on the front feet just broke. I don't think that this is the proper term but I don't know how to say it. The fetlocks of that poor horse were reaching the ground because of the suspensory ligaments that failed to sustain it. So the mare couldn't stand up more than a minute and when she could stand up she would stand only on her fetlocks. We put her down.

So it's not an isolated case. The wounds from her back here actually from her harness and the scratches were probably from beating her up with a chain or a piece of thick steel.



And thank you all for the information. I really want to learn a lot more about horses related with health, nutrition, medicine etc. So because of that I ask things like this one. I have a lot of cases and I want to find out answers. So thank you.
 

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I would agree that it is most likely a broken sesamoid. It seems almost as if it has calcified to remain that large. Sesamoid injuries are fairly common in racehorses, but it is usually diagnosed, treated(sometimes surgically) and the horse receives rest. The sesamoid injuries I have seen are mostly "lines" or small stress fractures. I have seen a few fully broken/shattered sesamoids, and those horses were treated and retired. I guess the horses in those pictures are examples of what happens when it goes untreated. How terrible. Her poor knees, too! I feel so sad for her, and I'm happy she is being cared for now - you are a very kind-hearted person!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would agree that it is most likely a broken sesamoid. It seems almost as if it has calcified to remain that large. Sesamoid injuries are fairly common in racehorses, but it is usually diagnosed, treated(sometimes surgically) and the horse receives rest. The sesamoid injuries I have seen are mostly "lines" or small stress fractures. I have seen a few fully broken/shattered sesamoids, and those horses were treated and retired. I guess the horses in those pictures are examples of what happens when it goes untreated. How terrible. Her poor knees, too! I feel so sad for her, and I'm happy she is being cared for now - you are a very kind-hearted person!
Unfortunately for us is very hard to treat such injuries. The shelter has no founds for this kind of injuries. Besides of that she was very thin and the prognostic wasn't to good. So investing a lot of money in a horse like this was not an option. In that period the shelter was barely able to feed all the horses. So the injury was left untreated to heal for itself. It wasn't the best solution but it was the only solution available.
Being a pasture ornament she doesn't put a lot of stress on fer feet.

We have another horse like her at the shelter right now with the exact same problem. But his feet are in a better shape than those of this mare. I don't have pictures available of him. He has the both front fetlocks like that but without the swelling appearance. So I guess that isn't a rare injury in carriage horses too.
 

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Oh, I didn't mean that YOU should have treated it - from the video it seems as though it was already pretty far gone.
You are doing a great thing for this poor mare...
 

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I'd put the horse down. That is just down right pathetic.
Honestly: the shelter money could be better spend 100 different ways then 'saving' this horse. She has to be in some pain...

People don't even want the sane, healthy, ridable ones....but if you want a pasture pet; you can find a million free 'healthier' pasture pets any day around here.
 

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She is a sweet horse even if she bites and kicks. We didn't even try to fix those issues because of her health condition. I guess that she will remain with those behavioral issues all her life.
Oh, yes. Who wouldn't want to give a horse like that a forever home? :shock:

She's had a hard, sad life, Sure.
Do I feel bad for the little mare? Of course.

But I'd still put her down, its in her best insterest imo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'd put the horse down. That is just down right pathetic.
Honestly: the shelter money could be better spend 100 different ways then 'saving' this horse. She has to be in some pain...

People don't even want the sane, healthy, ridable ones....but if you want a pasture pet; you can find a million free 'healthier' pasture pets any day around here.

Totally agree with your point of view but how can you have a shelter without helping some horses like this? If they came to you and you see their will of life why put them down?.. The horses that came to us are in a proportion of 90 % cases without hope... We have at the moment 23 of horses, just 6 of them are sound and we accept every horse that came to us.
The shelter is not mine, I agree that some horses should be put down but I have no power to decide this. I just volunteer there and help when I can. But this mare deserves a chance of life, it's not a hopeless case and she doesn't suffer very much. She seems to be ok.

But you have right in a way. It depends on everyone point of view.
 

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I think euthanasia would be helping her. She is a drain on funds no matter how much you love her. And wen it all comes down to it, who is going to want a crippled horse to feed and care for if it can only ever be a pasture ornament. PLUS you have to think what her arthritis is going to be like eventually wih those messed up legs, that is going to do a number on her back and legs.

She is a sweet girl who has had a hard life, she shouldn't have to suffer anymore.

You ask,"what kind of shelter wouldn't help a horse like this?" My response is what kind of shelter would waste funds on a horse that has no chance of rehabbing and great potential for future problems instead of putting her out of her misery and spending the money on horses that can be rehabbed and sent to loving forever homes? It is a shelter, not a bank, you odnt have the funds to waste really...
 

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But this mare deserves a chance of life, it's not a hopeless case and she doesn't suffer very much. She seems to be ok.
But she does suffer. :-| Therefore, putting her down would be fair. There are few homes for agressive pasture pets.
 

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Everything that lives and breathes is a drain on funds. Horses, children, dogs, cats and old people!

I have an old gelding now, that I'm sure a lot of people would put down. But he gave me a lot of good years and so I take care of him even though he isn't sound.

If they have money to feed her and she has a decent quality of life, well, that is what rescues are for. Isn't it? If they only take in sound and healthy horses, they would be horse traders, not a rescue facility.
 

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Everything that lives and breathes is a drain on funds. Horses, children, dogs, cats and old people!

I have an old gelding now, that I'm sure a lot of people would put down. But he gave me a lot of good years and so I take care of him even though he isn't sound.

If they have money to feed her and she has a decent quality of life, well, that is what rescues are for. Isn't it? If they only take in sound and healthy horses, they would be horse traders, not a rescue facility.

^^^ I agree completely. This mare likely gave a lot of good years of hard work and unfortunately sacrificed her health in the process, serving people, even if they were horrible ones. I don't understand people that think an animal should be euthanized just because they have outlived their usefulness. I realise I am kind of more emotional than logical in my mentality in regards to this, but to me the animals deserve some returned loyalty. People did this to her, she didn't do it to herself, and to toss her aside because she can't work anymore is a very sad thought to me. Just my opinion.

And as for this:
who is going to want a crippled horse to feed and care for if it can only ever be a pasture ornament
I can raise my hand here. I have one. I have a mare who is unsound in her legs and feet, and was deemed to have no usefulness beyond being a breeding machine. When she got to a point that her necessary vet bills looked to outweigh her money making potential as a broodmare, she was going to be sent to auction before I stepped in and asked for her. It took me about 2 seconds thought to take her on, and even if she never recovers enough to be anything but a crippled pasture ornament, she will have a good, well cared for and well loved life with me. Horses have been an important part of my life, and I think of it as my way of giving back. And I'll tell you what, this mare has more than repaid me already, I have learned so much about how precious the little things in life are from her, in the short time she has been with me. She makes me appreciate everything more. And that makes it all worth it, to me.
 

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Yes, but that horse is your pet. This is a horse at a rescue, taking the spot of a horse that ca be rehabbed and have a great new home. Is it fair to have her holding the place of another horse who could need help? She has had a good time at the rescue, I am sure she is happy, why not let her go when she is happy than wait til she is in crippling pain from the inevitable arthritis?
 

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I can appreciate your point of view, honestly, it just doesn't line up with my own. I've never seen an over-funded rescue and goodness knows they see more bad cases like this than the ones that can make a good turn around and become a valuable working animal. But to me, that really isn't the point. You don't go into rescue just to take on the only "slightly broken toys" or ones that have maximum resale potential. Rescue in itself isn't a highly logical and certainly not profitable occupation. But again, to my mind anyways, that's not the point. To me, rescue is about taking the cast offs no one else has the heart to love. If they can be rehabbed and go on to have a working career, then that is icing, certainly. No harm, no foul, I think we just see this thing differently. I tend to be very logical about most things in my life, but this is one area where I'm not able to be. :D
 

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I respect your opinion and agree to disagree. Like you I prefer to look at the logic in life rather than get caught up in emotion, even if my heart says "aww save the pony", call it cold but that is how I am.
 

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Why not let her go when she is happy than wait til she is in crippling pain from the inevitable arthritis?
Or you could always do the middle way, and let her be happy until she starts to show signs of pain. On the subject of why anyone would want a crippled horse who is a "pasture ornament", I also have one. Hoover is also a broken down carriage horse, and some day he will arthritis that will force me to put him down. The key word there is -some day-. Right now he is comfortable and happy, runs and plays like any other horse. He just can't be ridden, but I knew that when I adopted him. And actually, I could still ride him. But it would break him down faster, and I will not do that to him. But I also won't end his life while he can still enjoy it.

Also, there are rescues that specialize in horses that -are not- able to be rehomed. At the rescue I volunteer with we have permanent residents... mainly blind horses. Could we use the money to rehab potentially adoptable horses? Yes. But it's -our choice- what we choose to rescue. If the funders thought it was best to only deal with horses who can be ride-able, then they would reflect that in their donations. Why does a rehomeable horse have more right to a happy life than a non rehomeable one? Because they can be of use to us as humans? We actually specialize in horses that other rescues won't take, or rescue rescues...horses from "rescues" that are starved and abused.

Evans- I would immediately put her on some sort of glucosamine and condroitin supplement. Her joints look like they have fused in the front, so the arthritis is going to come in her knees. I wouldn't call her a lost case by any means compared to some of the horses we rehab. The kicking and biting is just fear of being hit...but she looks like she still has soft eyes, so it should work it's way out with trust. Hoover went through a kicking and biting period for the same reason...the Amish used to hit him with a 2x4. She just needs to know no one is going to beat her anymore, that she'll get food, and not be asked to pull anything ever again.
 
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