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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
We are about to take our two horses to our own property from a boarding facility.
We want to do in/out stalls (10x20 outside, 12x12 inside).
Regarding the footing, my plan was to dig down about 3-4 inches and put a layer of stone dust, then 3 or so inches of sand on top.

The type of sand we are is from our neighbor who has horses and calls it 'equine sand' (he has a bunch extra). They are also newer to horses so he couldn't really explain what it was.
All he knows is it doesn't pack well. Our land does a decent job of draining already but we think this will really help.
Does this sound right?

We are located in Connecticut, USA.

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sure thing! He originally was going to use it in his round pen but then used more of a stone dust material as it packed better. I know it drains really well. Thank you!
 

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I'd guess it to be a washed sand. I'm on the opposite coast but we use a washed sand for arenas because it doesn't pack and drains easily due to the dirt and crusher dust washed out. That's also why it can be spendy.
Crusher dust or DG is what can be used as a base under the washed sand because of its ability to pack down creating a barrier between the ground and the arena sand.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'd guess it to be a washed sand. I'm on the opposite coast but we use a washed sand for arenas because it doesn't pack and drains easily due to the dirt and crusher dust washed out. That's also why it can be spendy.
Crusher dust or DG is what can be used as a base under the washed sand because of its ability to pack down creating a barrier between the ground and the arena sand.
I think you are right. I think it may be a washed sand.
He originally purchased it for his round pen, but then realized it doesn't pack well at all so he did not want to use it. It seems like a very fine sand (not as fine as silt though).

Good to know I am on the right track with dust down first, then sand. I will post a picture tomorrow.
Thank you!
 

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The two major categories of stable flooring materials depend on whether the material is porous or impervious to wetness. Floor construction, from the ground up, will depend on what type of material is chosen. Porous floors will have an underlying foundation of sand and/or gravel to aid water movement down into the ground below the stable. Impervious floors may be sloped toward a drain so that urine and water can run out of the stall. Even impervious floors have a few inches of sand or fine gravel underneath for material stability and drainage of subsurface water. With either type of stall flooring, often enough bedding is used to absorb excess water and urine so actual liquid runoff is minimal except after a stall washdown.
Refer to Horse Stable Flooring Materials and Drainage
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The two major categories of stable flooring materials depend on whether the material is porous or impervious to wetness. Floor construction, from the ground up, will depend on what type of material is chosen. Porous floors will have an underlying foundation of sand and/or gravel to aid water movement down into the ground below the stable. Impervious floors may be sloped toward a drain so that urine and water can run out of the stall. Even impervious floors have a few inches of sand or fine gravel underneath for material stability and drainage of subsurface water. With either type of stall flooring, often enough bedding is used to absorb excess water and urine so actual liquid runoff is minimal except after a stall washdown.
Refer to Horse Stable Flooring Materials and Drainage
Hey Joline,
Thank you for the info.
Our indoor stalls actually are concrete with rubber matting.
The outdoor is what I am confused on.
I think a dug out layer of stone dust, then sand is the way to go. Thank you!
 

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We have a property in CT, we used septic sand which sounds much like you’re describing.

It doesn’t pack solid and it drains really well.

We laid it over crushed stone with rubber mats on top in the stables and in the centre aisle where we had mats and pavers.
 
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