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Shadow is a VERY easy keeper and this summer is my first summer with him so I was being very cautious about setting him out in pasture at first. he was in a nice pasture but has eaten it bare so we moved him to another which is very large and tall lush grass. i was worried about leaving him out all day and night in there but the farmer said if he hasnt foundered yet then he should be in the clear. i put him out friday afternoon and wasnt able to see him untill yesterday morning. He took a poop while i was grooming him and it was a mustard color and very wet/loose. he seems to be acting fine, seems a little ouchie still but im working on that (getting ready to fit him for boots, he was already like that before this incident) but doesnt seem colicy or anything. I moved him out of that pasture back to his old one but im just concerned and wanted to know if anyone had any tips on what to watch out for and if it will be ok to let him back into such a lush pasture again. hes on no hay and 3 cups grain. thanks :0)
 

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I would be very careful...as it can take weeks for founder. The subtle signs of laminitis (pre-founder)...are standing funny, strong digital pulse, running a temp, ouchy feet. Google it....there are tons of sites on the subject.
 

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During the day the sugars are at its highest in the grass, due to the sunshine. If it all possible, turning your guy out during the night would be better.
 

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IF possible, just let him start out grazing for a couple of hours at a time, in the early morning or at dusk. Work up to overnight, because night is better (less sugars that cause laminitis). If he's an easy keeper, you probably don't want him on lush grass 24/7 and whatever you do, try to keep it consistent, or about the same amount of time each day, not feast one day, then starve the next, or that will be apt to cause all sorts of digestive upset.

It's common to see them have the runs after any change in diet, but the main thing is to take is slow with the changes.

Acute Laminitis occurs about 72 hours after the trigger, but if you suspect your horse was overdosed on grain or grass, get him moving before that 72 hour window is closed, and he's apt to metablolize some of the sugar and prevent, or at least mininmize the pain. Once the pain is set in, your horse should not be forced to move around, for another 72 hours. After that, a good trim and walking are the best things for him, aside from not overdosing him on the same feed (but don't starve him, or you aren't doing him any favors, either).
 
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