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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

I'm interested if anyone has heard of or has any experience with lameness in the front actually due to issues with the hind legs, specifically the hocks.

To briefly summarize: my horse is coming up on 6 weeks with a left front lameness primarily at the trot. Never any heat or swelling anywhere. No issues with farrier/ shoeing. Most recent vet visit involved several X-rays that did not show anything concerning. Minimal improvement in lameness despite 6 weeks of rest (as in no riding, not stall rest).

We know he has some arthritic soreness in both hocks and had planned injections prior to this acute lameness. Vet is now suspecting front lameness may be due to prolonged compensation for hock soreness. We are tentatively planning injections again to see if it helps. Has anyone dealt with a similar issue? Thank you!
 

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Its not uncommon for a horse or any animal for that matter to shift weight from a sore leg and place the excess on another, which usually results in the other legs being sore.
<----This.

Humans can also over-compensate for an issue and pretty soon it's "which leg do I limp on now, they both hurt".
 
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<----This.

Humans can also over-compensate for an issue and pretty soon it's "which leg do I limp on now, they both hurt".
Indeed. I actually had to see a chiropractor for a few months because my left leg was accepting more weight during normal daily life but while shoeing horses my right leg took all the weight. It had me all messed up 😬
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies! I wasn't sure if prolonged referred lameness made sense despite the lack of work … especially as the vet seems more 'let's see if the injections help' than 'this is definitely the issue'. Hopefully I'll have a happier horse in a couple weeks!
 

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there's also the issue of not being able to spot lameness correctly. at the trot, the horse can appear off on the left front, but it might actually be the right rear. Is this vet quite good at discerning correctly lameness issues? want to post a video of your horse ? and get 20 different opinions?
 
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