The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! So I'm wanting to try to transition my still fairly green boy into a Fulmer to work on his collection, bending, and help him from leaning on the bit. I've got both a single joint and a french link on the way, mostly because I've never used a french link on him and wanted to try it to see if he prefers something double jointed. He started out in an eggbutt mullen mouth Happy Mouth with bubbles (which was my last gelding's favorite bit) but after issues on collection, I moved him into a half-spoon snaffle (which is actually his driving bit.) I decided I needed to get him something else. Although he's doing well in the half-spoon, I'd like to keep that bit with his harness and get him something else.

So, now that I've said all of that, I've done research on the Fulmer, and I really like everything about it. Also, the fact that the Spanish Riding School starts and schools their horses in it is pretty sweet. If it's good enough for them, it's good enough for my Sammy, right? My biggest question that I haven't found a solid answer to is... Why are the cheeks on a Fulmer bent on one end as opposed to the full cheek which is straight? Also, do the bent ends go on top or bottom of the muzzle when I finally get these suckers and put them on his bridle? Thanks everybody!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
I've always thought that the difference between full-cheek Fulmer was that the Fulmer had loose rings vs the one piece of the full-cheek.

Now, I've never used a Fulmer. However (and this is a total guess) it's say the curved part goes up, so that the curve would help keep the bit keepers from sliding off.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you! Yeah, the fulmer has loose rings with discourage the horse from "leaning" on the bit. It has a lot of really positive things about it and I'm excited to try it! Someone in another group told me that they're bent for a couple of reasons. One being the length of the shank. Since the shank is typically longer it allows for the widening of the face. Also the bends will push on the horses nose encouraging them to turn. I can't wait to see how my boy does in it, hoping it will help him learn even faster! :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,272 Posts
A fulmer has loose rings, whereas a full cheek has them fixed to the cheek. Both can provide mild poll pressure if you use the keepers correctly. You can set the keepers either close to the bit (less leverage) or further out on the cheekpieces of the bridle (more leverage). When pressure is applied to the reins, you not only get the snaffle bit action, the leverage on the cheekpieces provides pressure on the poll.
The principle between the fixed rings/loose rings is the same as any snaffle....

Loose ring - this can rotate around on the mouthpiece. This sliding makes it harder for the horse to resist it and set themselves against it. It can, however, pinch the skin when it turns.

Fixed ring - this cannot rotate like the loose ring and hence the bit is more stable in the mouth.

Here is a tidbit of information about Fulmer bits, the differences that are out there in manufacturing and a "heads-up" of information to store away for use at a further point in time...
The BALANCE Fulmer Snaffle Bit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've done plenty of research on the bit itself, so I was aware of all of those differences. As stated, the only thing that Google didn't have an answer for was why the stupid shanks are bent on one end lol. It seems like a really functional bit, and it surprises me that it's not more popular in the US. For my green gelding who's still learning what to do with himself, it seems like a great place to put him at to help him figure things out. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49,777 Posts
As with the full cheek snaffle, take care not to let your horse snag it on anything, such as his own stirrup if he reaches around to his belly. there is a whole thread recently about accidents that have happened in full cheek snaffles.

I just would used an eggbutt snaffle, and a chin strap (not a curb strap, but a chin strap) to prevent the bit from being pulled through his mouth if and when you pull one rein a lot more than the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've got the bit keepers, definitely don't want to risk any hang ups! He's not one that tries to rub on things or turn his head a bunch while bridled. If he were I wouldn't even consider it! :)
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
36,325 Posts
There's no saying that he wont lean on the Fulmer in the same way he was leaning on the Happy Mouth
If you're relying on reins to turn him (having to use enough pressure that its pulling the bit into through his mouth then you should probably go back to some groundwork basics and do some exercises to improve his flexibility. Your legs need to be as much involved in turning as your hands when you're in the saddle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
The cheek pieces are bent on the FM because a horse's face is wider at the top than the bottom. So the horse isn't poked in the face, they bend them out of the way.

Using the bit hooks/keepers will change the way the bit sits in your horse's mouth, but it won't stop it from catching if they happen to swing their head around etc. You do have to be on the ball with them all the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
My biggest question that I haven't found a solid answer to is... Why are the cheeks on a Fulmer bent on one end as opposed to the full cheek which is straight? Also, do the bent ends go on top or bottom of the muzzle when I finally get these suckers and put them on his bridle? Thanks everybody!
Hrm. You sparked my interest in them, might be another bit to try for the heck of it although Cally & I seem to be working well in the Waterford. It's amazing how many sites don't tell you which way the curved end goes o_O What I've noticed is most sites show the curved end up. From the ONE place I actually read something on them someone commented the curved part goes up so the bit doesn't slide through the keepers as easily.

But don't quote me. I've never personally used the bit myself, just made me super curious :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Jaydee, we do a bunch of ground work and he moves off of leg very well, it's the collection we really have a problem with (although it is getting tons better, he still needs some work) and when he collects, he gets heavy on the front. A lot of it is due to building hind end muscle, but not all of it. I feel that with the loose ring he won't be able to hang on the way he does. And yes, he will definitely have to be babysat with the full cheeks! The last thing I want is a hang up! :)

Also SketchyHorse, I just got my regular joined snaffle fulmer yesterday, and I'm itching to try it out! What I find super interesting/annoying about it is that the brand logo sits on the mouthpiece, but if you hold it to where the logo is upright, the bent ends are on bottom... Ugh confusing! I wish I could just call up the Spanish riding school and be like, "hey how's it hanging, btw which end goes on top with the fulmer?" Trial and error it is! I'll keep y'all posted on our first ride in the new bit on Christmas! :)
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I rode Samson in his fulmer with bit keepers yesterday, and I'm completely converted. It was like I was riding a different horse. He collected with very little encouragement and his transitions went from collected walk to nose in the air trot, to staying smooth and collected through the entire upward transition. It made it so much easier to ride with my seat because I wasn't focusing on getting him to give to the bit. I strongly recommend the bit. It's Samson approved!
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
I rode Samson in his fulmer with bit keepers yesterday, and I'm completely converted. It was like I was riding a different horse. He collected with very little encouragement and his transitions went from collected walk to nose in the air trot, to staying smooth and collected through the entire upward transition. It made it so much easier to ride with my seat because I wasn't focusing on getting him to give to the bit. I strongly recommend the bit. It's Samson approved!
Posted via Mobile Device
I was actually considering using this bit for a while. Then I read a story about a horse who got the full-cheek snagged on in the girth, reared, flipped over, and killed his rider. Put me off this bit completely. Very scary.

Be careful, and double check your keepers every ride!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,645 Posts
The bit keepers do two things.
1. they keep objects from getting hung up on the bit wheich can cause a big wreck

2. they hold the bit steady and keep the bit from rolling in the mouth, which changes how the bit sits in the mouth.

It is an old wives tale that a full cheek can have ANY effect on the poll. It cannot. There is no way that there is any leverage that could bring pressure on the poll.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top