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I'm starting to learn very quick that it is hard to gain experience, especially when you can't drive. I find myself in a never-ending cycle where I find somewhere to volunteer, but I can't ever find away to get there. The barns won't offer to help with transportation, and I don't really have the friends to give me a ride either. It even causes problems with finding a way to do my mandatory internship credit for my major. No one really offers housing other than summer camps. I wish Uber was more affordable, but it's $30 a trip just going about five miles, and public transportation isn't an option either. I want to work in the horse industry, and I know it is possible for someone in my situation, but I am looking to see if maybe a more experienced equestrian could help me to make this happen. I know it can happen, but I just have to find the way. Horses are my passion after all. Let me know your recommendations!

Thank you again!
Blossom
 

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Do you have an instructor that could perhaps help guide you towards your goal and take you under their wing (Training/ Instructing etc?)? Perhaps they can provide you with a more flexible schedule for you to shadow on a can-do basis.

I'm going to be honest here that it is very difficult to break into the horse industry, especially if you don't have the freedom to travel in/out as you can. It takes copious amounts of time to not only build the skills required to succeed in the industry, but also in shadowing professionals in the community and getting your name out there (networking). When I was training for my instructors license, I did 100s of shadowing hours under a certified instructor and that required driving 30-60min out to the barn 2-4 days a week at least. With my own horse, I rode in several clinics and saved up my own money from my part-time job to pay. But, I still only instruct occasionally and it is by no means a full time job for me, nor do I ever intend it to be. The people I do know who do it full time and successfully have gone through several working student positions under big name trainers internationally and have done their fair share of competing at higher levels too. They are also generally very confident people who are not afraid of marketing their experience to others and taking on new opportunities. Few of them can make it their absolute job and most have a secondary job to help pay bills on the side.

Look into working student positions in the future. If you have a good instructor, mabye ask them if they can help you find someone (using their connections) or if you are already in an area where there are high level trainers, then look into a working student position with one of them. This is the easiest way to gain experience and networking in the professional community. BUT, I'd wait until you finish your schooling because for the most part, these are full time positions. You may be lucky in finding one that is part-time, but again.. you run into the troubles of carpooling.

I'd also look at ways that you could perhaps get an "'edge" into the professional community. By that I mean find a skill or method you can learn that is different from the rest. Something you can advertise to potential clientele. There are numerous talented trainers/ instructors already. Why should consumers pick you? What makes you different? You need to have all the general knowledge necessary for your chosen profession, but specializing in an area where there is a 'gap in the market' may help you be more competitive with other professionals.

Right now though, I'd save up money for travelling and/ or lessons. Take those opportunities as you can and be sure to show your interest in the horse industry. Let whoever you work for/ learn from know that you highly appreciate the opportunity and would love to do more when you can, but are limited by travelling. As you are able, expand on the opportunities you can take.
 
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