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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I was taught basically what a walk, working walk, trot and canter look like. However one of the horse trainers I follow on Instagram said something about how "a trot is a 3-beat gait" and I never knew they had such specific of rhythms. So, what are these rhythms? And, do they apply to gaited horses? (I only own gaited horses)
 

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I don't know about gaited horses, but the walk, trot, canter all have their specific 'beats'.

The walk is a 4 beat gait because it has 4 steps to it. First a hind leg (1) , then the fore leg on that same side (2), then the opposite hind leg (3) and the foreleg on that side (4). If you've ever heard of a lateral walk (a no no in dressage), then the rhythm is disrupted and more like a 2-beat. the left and right side move at the same time instead of the legs moving at different times.

The trot is a two beat gait, actually. That is because there are two sequences to it: 1 diagonal pair (lets say left hind and right front) and then the next diagonal pair (right hind and left front).

The canter is 3 beat. The sequence for the left lead is (1) outside right hind, (2) diagonal pair (left hind and right front) and (3) inside left fore. The opposite of this sequence is the right lead.
 

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I think you need to be following someone else. A trot is two beats. Canter three. Walk and gallop 4. Gaited horse or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It was as long time ago! She might have said something else haha

Thank you! I guess it was passed over in my training. Then again, I was not taught training for any kind of showmanship, so it may not have been viewed as important
 

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Some of the gaits that gaited horses perform have two beats such as the pace, or flying pace that an Icelandic horse does.

However, most of the special gaits seem to have four beats, which is what makes them smoother than a trot for example. Racking is a four beat gait. The running walk is a four beat gait. Paso Finos do four beat gaits. Back to Icelandic horses, the tolt is also a four beat gait.

I do not know of any specialized gaits that have three beats, like the canter does.
 

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Rather than a three beat gait, could she have meant that some of the four beat gaits, which sit between the walk and canter, have at least one foot on the ground at a time and therefore, three in the air. The Icelandic Tölt or, for obvious reasons, the Triple in South Africa.
 

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@jjmoon if you own a gaited horse I suggest you follow Ivy's Glide Gait on the book of faces. She has a lot of great info and I love her posts
 
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