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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Alright, a little background. I am NOT a gaited horse person. At all. I do not like it, and yes, I’ve ridden comfortable Paso Finos…just not my thing. So no trying to convince me to like it 😁

My vet hooked me up with a lady (who happens to be practically a neighbor I never officially met), who has an IR horse that she didn’t have the time/ability to exercise like he needs. He is supposedly a Tennessee Walker but she believes he has something else in there. He was purchased from a dealer who wasn’t exactly honest about him.

I have been trail riding him 3-4x a week for a few weeks now and absolutely love him. He reminds me a bit of my two (now retired) horses that I could ride anywhere, anytime and had the right amount of spice and nice. The owner has noticed how well we get on, and unfortunately, after a riding accident she had (on another horse) a couple years ago, she doesn’t believe she’ll ever be able to ride him like he needs. She has offered him to me, but we won’t be making any concrete decisions until spring most likely.

here is my question. Is it possible and/or fair to train a gaited horse to NOT gait? He does trot and canter, but always moves into a pace-y gait before I can get him to steady into a proper trot. I haven’t yet asked for the canter because he goes back into the pace-y gait. He does pick up the canter on his own if we go uphill and it feels pretty good.

I plan on doing some dressage work with him after thanksgiving. He doesn’t seem to have much training as far as flatwork (moving off leg and seat, lateral, etc).

the owner is not worried about him “gaiting,” and he is not, and will never be, shown in any gaited classes. She is interested in simply finding him a good home. If I do take him, I will mostly trail ride. Taking him to some dressage shows would be an interest if I can either discourage, or learn how to fully “separate” his gaiting.

has anyone else done this? I will be doing more research into dressage and gaited horses, but wanted to get some personal insight if anyone here has it!

spirit is the handsome buckskin. The owner (on the grey paso fino), a couple ladies and I got out for a fun little group ride on Sunday!

Clothing Horse Equestrian helmet Working animal Saddle
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have two gaited horses; one Missouri Fox Trotter, and one Racking horse. Both gait (the Missouri moreso than my Racker) and I have tried to get a canter out of one of them, and he just won't do it. He walks, paces, and gallops. That's it. The other one walks, paces, lope/canters and gallops. I really don't think you could retrain him to do regular gaits. Not saying it's impossible, but I've just never seen or heard it don't before.

😊 He's handsome.
Thank you! I am beginning to think I might have to broaden my horizons on this one haha. Everything I’ve found so far on dressage with Tennessee walking horses and/or gaited horses, is using the natural gaits of the horse.

looks like I might be watching a lot of YouTube videos on gaited horses!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You can teach a canter. They'll always naturally gait but you can control it. Hold in a running walk on a walker and you get a walk. they'll always have longer strides and move different than a quarter horse though. But they can canter for sure, it just takes training to maintain it. Just like it takes training to train a colt to hold a steady, nice canter.
this is what I was thinking. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I’ve ridden Tennessee Walkers since 1990 so I won’t express my thoughts on teaching the horse to trot—-

What I will express my thoughts on, is the fact the horse has been diagnosed IR. TWH’s are at the top of the list for insulin resistance. I hope you are familiar with how strict it’s diet needs to be.

Managing IR goes beyond exercise. It is not a one and done episode, even if the horse is in remission, it still needs to be carefully managed via a strict diet and frequent hoof care.
Yes it is being managed.
 
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