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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 8 year old gelding, recently bought him two weeks ago. He is a 2D barrel horse & I've watched him countless times being rode. Saturday, I tacked him up for my boyfriend to ride. I checked for any soreness, like I always do. I've ridden him twice also with no problems. He stood for tacking, & mounting, but as soon as my boyfriend's butt hit the seat of the saddle he blew up. Bucking, spinning, rearing. After about 5 or 6 bucks my boyfriend lost his seat & fell off the side. The gelding then went through a fence, galloped the field a few times, then stood in the middle, calm as can be & let me walk right to him to be caught. I'm not sure if he was having a bad day, or if he just didn't like my boyfriend, or what. My friends & I did leave before him, but he could still see the other horses.. I'm not sure if he is that horse sour to blow a fuse or what?
 

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Did you boyfriend just "plop" in the saddle when he mounted? Or did he sit down softly? Sounds like he was in pain from the moment of contact on his back. I would have his back checked. Was the saddle tree sound? I would check my tack as well has my horses back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Did you boyfriend just "plop" in the saddle when he mounted? Or did he sit down softly? Sounds like he was in pain from the moment of contact on his back. I would have his back checked. Was the saddle tree sound? I would check my tack as well has my horses back.
My boyfriend never plops down. He does ride in a heavier made roping saddle, the gelding is used to a lighter, round skirt barrel saddle. They are both FQHB, & he's been ridden everyday by one of our friends up until we got him, so he has no back issues. Our friend did tell us that he still "wasnt sure" about a rider being on him. He was bought in MN & brought down here this Spring, untouched, used as a pasture breeding stud. He was gelded once he got here & worked everyday. He's only been ridden for about 4 months total.
 

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so, he's already a 2D barrel horse? I am confused. Sounds like he is very green, though, and it might not be so surprising that he would buck when mounted. He is at anew place, new riders, sounds like new saddle, and the herd is moving away from him , though still in sight, you say.

I would say that there is a lot of emotional stressors on a green horse.
 

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Tiny, is right. I was going to say the same things Tiny said. If I were you, I would slow down and treat him more like a green horse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've only had him almost two weeks. The man before us got him gelded, did a week of ground work, & threw him straight into barrels. All he knows is fast. He doesn't even lunge, he wants to drag you around the whole time. Have ya'll ever worked with a "emotionally broken" horse? That's kinda what he is. He never was really loved, just ridden hard then tied to a post to cool down while his owner/rider made meth. Sad really. He's coming around pretty nicely, instead of running away from people trying to catch him he normally stands & waits for you to get him. He does seem to favor women, men he is pretty spooky around, but from what I heard from some sources about what all his previous owner did too him, I can understand why he's uneasy with men.
 

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Him being a green horse and then everyone leaving him behind while your boyfriend mounted more than likely caused the wreck.
There is a reason why it is bad etiquette to leave someone alone to mount, let alone a green horse or a colt.
Next time I suggest everyone wait for him to get mounted before riding off. He should tip his nose to the inside while getting on so he can't peel out and once he's mounted turn him around on a few tight circles to the left until he takes a breath and relaxes then circles to the right. Then you all can ride off together.
If he wants to buck still then you have some other issues going on. You want to eliminate as many reasons why he's bucking as possible. Once you find the reason for bucking then you know how to fix it.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Him being a green horse and then everyone leaving him behind while your boyfriend mounted more than likely caused the wreck.
There is a reason why it is bad etiquette to leave someone alone to mount, let alone a green horse or a colt.
Next time I suggest everyone wait for him to get mounted before riding off. He should tip his nose to the inside while getting on so he can't peel out and once he's mounted turn him around on a few tight circles to the left until he takes a breath and relaxes then circles to the right. Then you all can ride off together.
If he wants to buck still then you have some other issues going on. You want to eliminate as many reasons why he's bucking as possible. Once you find the reason for bucking then you know how to fix it.
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The gelding has been ridden out alone before, so I don't see why it bothered him then. He also ran the other direction once he got my boyfriend off.
 

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Uh sorry but this poor horse has a lot of holes in his training, he is green and should not be getting put into these types of situations. You have only had him two weeks hardly enough time to get to know him, then he gets left behind with a rider he does not know and does not know him a recipe for disaster. He should not be running barrels just because he is fast, it is at best controlled chaos but he will blow up and hurt someone if things don't get changed for him. Horses buck out of fear, once they figure out they can get their rider off it becomes a habit. I would start over with him on the ground just like he was an unbroke colt as if he had never been ridden and bring him on slow. He is not emotionally broken he is untrained go back to square one establishing respect on the ground, spend time teaching him the basics and let him discover he does not need to be fearful, and you are able to be his leader. What he needs is leadership and education. Good luck to you and be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The man who had him before me gelded him himself. No vet, no medication. He pretty much hog tied him & sliced him open on the floor of a stall then left him tied up to drain. He doesn't trust many people because of this. I was told all this by the mans' cousin after he was jailed for meth. He has negative coggins, he's been vet checked, his teeth have been floated, he's been trimmed & shod, all in the last two weeks. I gave $100 for him & a yearling filly. The gelding, Hustler, is line bred Doc Bar & also has Zan Parr Bar & many others, the filly is line bred Doc Olena & Dash for Cash. The filly wasn't touched for six months until I got her, she is now halter & lead broke, been wormed, hooves trimmed, she loads & unloads, crosses wooden bridges, & loves to be petted & have baths. I've trained horses from ottb's up to mean stud's, & I told my boyfriend not to ride Hustler just yet, but he was hardheaded & went for it anyway.
 

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Sounds like you have a potentially really nice horse there. Riding him too soon, without putting some time in on the basics will be a waste of his potential, IMO. You can continue in the vein of his former owners; just throwing him into what you want him to do without any preperation or consideration for him.

OR, you can do things differently and end up with a mighty fine horse.

good job on the filly


I'd love to see some photos of this gelding (just writing that makes me cringe to think of the horror of the gelding he suffered)
 

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Just wanted to throw out that it could very well be the saddle.

Just because a saddle maker says the saddle has FQHB does not mean that their FQHB is the same as another maker's. I've known Circle Ys from different eras and disciplines that were called FQHB to fit the same horse completely differently.
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The gelding has been ridden out alone before, so I don't see why it bothered him then. He also ran the other direction once he got my boyfriend off.
Doesn't make any difference whether he's been ridden out by himself before. You put a horse/colt in that situation he will most likely pitch a fit. The point of my post was for you to eliminate as many causes as possible so you can find a solution. Not all bucking is solved the same.
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
He's not a bad horse he just needs some time. I can understand why he's jumpy & especially why he isn't a big fan of men.
Horse Mammal Mane Mare Sorrel
Halter Horse Mammal Horse tack Bridle
Horse Snout Sorrel Mare Pack animal
Vertebrate Mammal Horse Snout Nose
Mammal Horse Snout Sorrel Mane
Sorry for the photo spam, but I'm addicted to taking pictures of horses. Ha. :D The horse beside him in these pics is the filly, also.
 

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Have ya'll ever worked with a "emotionally broken" horse? That's kinda what he is. He never was really loved, just ridden hard then tied to a post to cool down while his owner/rider made meth.
He's not emotionally broke. Just green and needs a strong, fair leader. He needs to be put in situations set up for his success. Other horses riding off on him while his rider is mounting is not setting him up for success - especially if its a new rider and he is not a seasoned horse. I would back track in his training and restart it from the ground level to remove any potential holes in his training.

Also - don't right off the saddle being the problem. There is no set standard as to what "FQHB" or "Semi-QH Bars" etc are and it can vary from one saddle maker to another, and even within the same saddle maker between models. That is why each saddle needs to be evaluated for fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I know he's green but I also know a horse that is broken & one that isn't. He is broken. What horse wouldn't be broken when someone gelds him themselves with no medicine or anything to soothe the pain?
 

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Try really hard not to get into the "poor baby, you've had it so rough..." mentality.

You will get farther with him by being fair and consistent. A blow up is his way of telling you he's frustrated, and doesn't know what is expected of him. Listen to him, this will be a valuable tool and will let you know if you are going too fast with his training.
Then you simply back it down to your last known successful step and begin again, this time go slower and try different ways to explain what you want.

The blow up isn't the horse being bad or having "flashbacks" - it's just his way of pointing out holes in your training methods.
 

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The man before us got him gelded, did a week of ground work, & threw him straight into barrels. All he knows is fast. He doesn't even lunge, he wants to drag you around the whole time. Have ya'll ever worked with a "emotionally broken" horse? That's kinda what he is. He never was really loved, just ridden hard then tied to a post to cool down while his owner/rider made meth.
I have worked with many beaten, starved, tortured horse, which I guess you could call "broken". I've also worked with many horses with giant holes in their training. Step one: Forget everything about the abuse the moment you go to work with him. It doesn't matter what happened before, it matters how you treat him now.

Step two, you know he has huge holes in his training. If you keep riding a horse that does not have a proper foundation, eventually something has to give. He will start bucking, bolting, rearing, etc, because he does not have the correct training and experience to fall back on. Think of it like building a house. Leave out a few braces and a chunk of the foundation and it might look nice for a while, but it will collapse eventually, and any added stress will set it off.
Your gelding needs to be completely restarted, as if he had no training at all. Lunging, ground driving, basic riding, one rein stops, the whole process.

a horse doesn't need love from its human. They need a strong leader that they feel comfortable and confident following. I own a mare myself that doesn't want love and affection, she wants a good leader and a job.
 

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The man who had him before me gelded him himself. No vet, no medication. He pretty much hog tied him & sliced him open on the floor of a stall then left him tied up to drain. He doesn't trust many people because of this. I was told all this by the mans' cousin after he was jailed for meth. He has negative coggins, he's been vet checked, his teeth have been floated, he's been trimmed & shod, all in the last two weeks. I gave $100 for him & a yearling filly. The gelding, Hustler, is line bred Doc Bar & also has Zan Parr Bar & many others, the filly is line bred Doc Olena & Dash for Cash. The filly wasn't touched for six months until I got her, she is now halter & lead broke, been wormed, hooves trimmed, she loads & unloads, crosses wooden bridges, & loves to be petted & have baths. I've trained horses from ottb's up to mean stud's, & I told my boyfriend not to ride Hustler just yet, but he was hardheaded & went for it anyway.
"Saturday, I tacked him up for my boyfriend to ride." So why were you surprised that your BF
went for it?
 

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I know he's green but I also know a horse that is broken & one that isn't. He is broken. What horse wouldn't be broken when someone gelds him themselves with no medicine or anything to soothe the pain?
I've worked with a lot of horses that come from bad backgrounds. I still believe its not that the horse is emotionally broke. Yes - they knew they were in pain at a time and a certain human put them in pain, but they are "in the moment" animals. Now that the pain is gone they can get over it. Its humans putting their beliefs and feelings into the horse that cause the sense of "emotional brokenness" and make issues drag out. Yes, they may have trust issues to start off with, but that doesn't mean they are broken. Confident, fair, strong, understanding, and consistent leadership will get them over it fast.

Remove YOUR feelings about what happened to this horse in the past from the equation. Don't think of his past. Think of him as you would any other green horse and start his re-training as such. You will be surprised how far you will get when you remove your mental block about his past and just focus on him.
 
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