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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 5 year old gelding who I have owned since birth. I need to find the paperwork to determine the exact age, but I had him gelded when he was under a year old.

Because I have had several horses in my care during his life, he has been on the back burner until recently. I did work with him when he was young, don't get me wrong. I had him halter trained when he was a few months old. I started getting on his back at 2, nothing crazy because he was still very petite and growing. Just sitting and walking around bareback. Things got crazy in my life around that point and I was focused on other horses. I did little ground work sessions with him when I had time and hopped on him every now and then to make sure he remembered. I noticed during these ground work sessions that he was a lot more resistant than other horses I had worked with and he actually charged at me several times when I would drive his forequarters and hindquarters. I thought it was a training issue so I kept persisting with it and it got better... But he was still very easily "offended". It was always so confusing to me because in other respects he was the sweetest, friendliest horse. My mare I was training at the time was extremely dominant, and his behavior wasn't like hers. She was more consistent and logical... She was dominant and wanted to be the lead mare. He, on the other hand, was sensitive and easily offended and when he DID get upset he was MUCH more aggressive than my mare. He also started kicking a bit during this time, for example if I asked him to move without a halter on him or entered his stall too quickly. So I worked more on his submissiveness with his hindquarters... Driving them, asking him to move away from pressure, etc. It would seem to be better one day but I just never would know what to expect from him.

Fast forward to now. He's 5. Solid at walk and trot, still a little iffy on cantering but he's getting there. On the ground he's great, with a halter on. And that all sounds great except for the one day I do something a little off from his routine... Or if I enter his stall without giving him a chance to acknowledge me.... Or I "shoo" him without either a training stick in my hand or a halter on him.... Or any little tiny thing that he doesn't approve of that throws him off.

I really thought it was a training issue, but in addition to that... He poops in the same place. Always. Makes cleaning the barn easier I guess, but stud like. He is so territorial and funny about when and how you enter his space.

It's been awhile because the only mare he's around now is his mom, but I have witnessed him get an erection around mares in the past after he was gelded.

Then last night he kicked me. 11 years of horses and I got kicked for the first time by this little snot. Talk about a blow to the ego! Haha. It was all because I was standing in his stall and reaching over the fence to shoo him out of his mom's stall so he could come around and eat in his. He just swung around and kicked up both legs, nailing me in the hand.

This is after a great ground work session the day where his behavior had me feeling more hopeful about things... And then that?? That's what gets me, so unpredictable!!

I'm feeling like an absolute failure because it seems like I just don't know what the heck I'm doing and can't train my own horse, but with 11 years of experience, most of which dealing with problem horses, I feel like this can't just be me not knowing what I'm doing. Or maybe it is. I don't know. I feel terrible.

I'm also very limited on my time available to work with him AND he's really too small for me. I was intending to get him pretty solid and be ready to pass him on to my 10 year old sister, but I just don't trust him. I'm planning on getting married this year and moving out, and my dad already isn't crazy about me leaving horses so I downsized to just him and his bomb proof mom for my siblings to ride, but I really don't feel safe having him around kids.

I'm also very financially limited and probably can't afford what he would need medically if it is a hormonal thing, so I was thinking about just selling him, but how I can I sell him with tha behavior?

Help!!!!
 

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Saddlebag said it best, right now he doesn't respect you. His behavior isn't strictly composed around "stud like." He's turning his nose up to you and showing you HE is the top dog of the barn.

Take him to a round pen and move his body around, make him listen to YOU. When you lead him, he stops when you stop, he doesn't pass you. If he does a firm yank on the lead and send him backwards a few steps. They learn quickly with this little in-hand session.

Pooping in the same spot is not really significant either. Some horses are tidier than others. Most of mine poop in one spot, makes my life easier lol!

There was some argument in the last couple years that horses can be autistic, however, don't look for a problem in him. Assert that you are the Alpha with him and things will come into place as they should. Be smart, be on your toes, but don't LOOK for a problem. Horses are so perceptive that if you are anxious or uneasy, he'll read you like a book and play you like a fiddle while he's at it.

Be confident and firm, he needs to be reminded he's the horse, you're the human and he needs to respect you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's just weird because he does those things. I almost want to take a video and show how perfectly he behaves on the line. I have gone to zero tolerance for head shaking, ears back, etc. He swings his butt away if I just bend down and give him a dirty look. A little wiggle on the rope and he backs right up. He's very sensitive and responsive. Take the halter off and put him in his own turf and it's a different story. I wasn't even thinking the stud thing until yesterday. But I could be totally off on that. You guys are probably right, I just don't know what else I can do when he listens so well with a lead rope attached. Round penning? Although I'm kind of scared to do that because I just don't trust him at all without a halter. I'm also a little wary about riding him if he's that unpredictable on the ground. Should I just suck it up and try round penning? I run an online business and always have plenty of bubble wrap on hand.... I could just wrap myself up and give it a go ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You are so right about him being perceptive and pushing my buttons. With my horse history my confidence isn't quite what it used to be, and he makes me very uneasy and knows it. I just don't know how to get over it. Ugh. If a moderator can move this to training maybe that's a good idea, because I have a feeling this stud thing is me looking for a cop out :/
 

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I had a gelding that could be a real handful at times, but he was very talented, we were "close", and to me his abilities overshadowed his few less than desirable personality traits. Unlike you, I didn't overthink his behaviors (none of which ever included attempts to cover a mare) and a testosterone "problem" didn't cross my mind for a relatively long while. Somewhat like "can't see the forest for the trees". Well, it finally hit me like a ton of bricks. To test for abnormally high testosterone levels and remove all doubt is not that expensive. It is evaluating the choices available for them and their comfort that can be hard if the test results come back the way you hope they do not.
 

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Horse knows only time he has to "listen" to you is when you have him under control but once that is not in picture? He is showing you all the holes in his training.

Could be you are too soft when dealing with him, your handling mechanics are lacking greatly I would say from reading your post.

He could also have something going on internally that is causing more testosterone to be secreted. Vet could check that out. And going in one place in stall has nothing to do with sex of horse either. Don't know where you got that idea, but it is bunk.

But basic thing is, this horse is spoiled and if you don't get a handle on it? You are going to get hurt, or killed.

Any horse that dared to kick out at me, much less double barrel, would have a HCTJM so fast they would think they were going to die.

You need to get someone that really knows horses to help you as it needs to be on the ground.

I would imagine this horse is showing you a lot of disrespect even on the line or with halter on, and you just aren't realizing it.
 

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One of our geldings used to poop always in the same spot, as a matter of fact they all pooped in the same spot, mares included. Sometimes our old gelding would try to mount mares.
Your horse is not showing signs of being a stud, he is being a spoiled brat and trying to be the boss. He has had life pretty easy and now is being told he has to do things your way, not his.
As far as being perfect on the halter: have you ever had a dog that was an absolute angel while on leash and then you take leash off and BINGO, off the dog goes, running loose and paying no mind to your commands? How about a child holding mom's hand while going for a walk and then mom takes her hand away? Most kids are gone like a rocket.
When there is no "control" attached to horse, dog, human or whatever and that same horse, dog, human or whatever is not trained to accept rules than you have a fiasco.
He is spoiled and untrained and you have to start from the basics and make him understand the games are over and life is in your control whether with a halter on or a halter off. I also read that you are scared of him and he knows and plays on that fear.
 

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Inconsistency is what sounds like the problem to me just cause he isn't in your hands with a halter and lead rope doesn't mean you can't ask for good behaviors. I expect mine to behave around me in the field or doing work. Set consistent ground rules as the alpha keep a lunge whip handy when around him if necessary. If he is in your space make him move off. I think you need to bring with you an extra set of experienced eyes to look for little nuances in behavior that they notice and would of corrected immediately but you missed. It's a great way to learn. Even experienced traininers sometimes need someone else to point out something they missed. I learn from more experienced people all the time.
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Your horse is not showing signs of being a stud, he is being a spoiled brat and trying to be the boss. He has had life pretty easy and now is being told he has to do things your way, not his.
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This. And even if he were a stud this behavior isn't acceptable.
Sounds like a to the core brat to me.
 
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