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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any advice on fixing some general attitude problems? My mare is fine to catch, but she's pretty herd bound right now as we just moved barns and they've been there for a day or two now, but at the other barn, she always wanted to be caught and work, but she just wouldn't listen to me, and when i made her listen to me she just got ****ed off and tried to act like she was the boss. She ignores the bit, just grabs it and runs if she decides that she's done working, and wont stand still. I've tried everything, and the trainer i'm with right now hates thoroughbreds, and doesn't want to help me, she's just like 'well your horse is crazy and you're stupid.' It might be my own attitude lately that's making karma (my horse) misbehave, because i'm just embarrassed to have her around my trainer, and i get anxious when she watches us ride because she doesn't help us and just criticizes us. It all frustrates me because when i first bought karma she was really relaxed, sweet and kind, and listened to me consistently, and would set her head and move from her hind end and stay on the bit, but now she rides with a hollow back and is really jittery and doesn't listen and I've done everything i know how to do and it just doesn't work with her...anyways, anyone have any suggestions? Or want to buy her? lol.
 

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the good horse is still there. things have come in between , though. could be saddle fit, could be food, could be environment, could be you and your riding, and your trainer. Do not blame your horse, though. Stand back and really look at her, and ask yourself, "what is she saying to me?", becuase every behavior stems from the horse expressing its' feeling/need/pain. It's your job to listen. as long as you are embarassed or wanting to just be rid of her, you cannot hear what is being said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
the good horse is still there. things have come in between , though. could be saddle fit, could be food, could be environment, could be you and your riding, and your trainer. Do not blame your horse, though. Stand back and really look at her, and ask yourself, "what is she saying to me?", becuase every behavior stems from the horse expressing its' feeling/need/pain. It's your job to listen. as long as you are embarassed or wanting to just be rid of her, you cannot hear what is being said.
I know there's a GREAT and wonderfully sweet horse in there somewhere, that's why it's so frustrating. I haven't changed my riding at all, and originally I had her going w/t/c relaxed and on a loose rein (which is why i'm so baffled by her sudden behavior). My saddle fits her perfectly, but my trainer hasn't helped me at all, only telling me things that DON'T really work, and not wanting to work with me, then not offering me a different solution when i tell her what i tried didn't work.
I've been thinking about her diet, she gets some high octane feed, but doesn't get much of it and i don't know if changing it would be an option as my trainer feeds her whole barn the same thing, she has forage constantly, she had hay, but since we moved she now has grass and hay whenever she wants as she's turned out 24/7.
 

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Well, it sounds as if you don't feel so good about this trainer. how did you get hooked up with her? and what makes you stay?
 

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You're with this trainer why? She's not helping you or your horse. In fact as said you're feeling negatively about your horse and the trainer is behind that. Get a trainer who knows what they are doing and understands the horse. Even if you don't like a horse any trainer worth their salt will understand and be able to work with and bring out the best in that horse, as opposed to causing issues blaming them on the horse and owner, refusing to help, and clearly not understanding the animal, and refusing to admit it. The trainer blaming horse as crazy is just as bad as calling you stupid.. and WHAT trainer calls her client stupid? Flat out rude and you're also paying her.

Anyways, rant over. You need a trainer, and NOT that one. You said she's a TB, seems like typical TB issues.. did she have race training? How much retraining has she had? You have no reason to be embarrassed of your horse, your trainer is incompetent and rude, don't start second guessing yourself, your trainer is supposed to give you confidence, not take it away. If you're going to be embarrassed it should be of your trainer.

Have a vet check, make sure her environment is as calming as possible and nothing is setting her off (including your trainer), make sure YOU are as calm as possible, think positive, you just need to get her mentally focused instead of in far far away land (a place some TB's are rather fond of)

You are frustrated and you need someone to get you through it. If it doesn't work it doesn't work but if she used to be like that she definitely has the potential to be that same sweet horse. If you have to sell her but I really don't think that is necessary.

For now, get a new trainer and work on relaxing nothing more nothing less. Baby steps, go back to the beginning. Make sure everything you do is relaxed and positive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You're with this trainer why? She's not helping you or your horse. In fact as said you're feeling negatively about your horse and the trainer is behind that. Get a trainer who knows what they are doing and understands the horse. Even if you don't like a horse any trainer worth their salt will understand and be able to work with and bring out the best in that horse, as opposed to causing issues blaming them on the horse and owner, refusing to help, and clearly not understanding the animal, and refusing to admit it. The trainer blaming horse as crazy is just as bad as calling you stupid.. and WHAT trainer calls her client stupid? Flat out rude and you're also paying her.

Anyways, rant over. You need a trainer, and NOT that one. You said she's a TB, seems like typical TB issues.. did she have race training? How much retraining has she had? You have no reason to be embarrassed of your horse, your trainer is incompetent and rude, don't start second guessing yourself, your trainer is supposed to give you confidence, not take it away. If you're going to be embarrassed it should be of your trainer.

Have a vet check, make sure her environment is as calming as possible and nothing is setting her off (including your trainer), make sure YOU are as calm as possible, think positive, you just need to get her mentally focused instead of in far far away land (a place some TB's are rather fond of)

You are frustrated and you need someone to get you through it. If it doesn't work it doesn't work but if she used to be like that she definitely has the potential to be that same sweet horse. If you have to sell her but I really don't think that is necessary.

For now, get a new trainer and work on relaxing nothing more nothing less. Baby steps, go back to the beginning. Make sure everything you do is relaxed and positive.

I do sadly actually have to sell her, and I don't have the option of moving barns because i'm not actually paying her, but really working for her, i'm training a few horses for her, and feeding and managing the barn over the weekends. She refuses to help me because she says 'a trainers horse should already be well trained because their own horse is their last priority' She's generally a very nice women and i rode with her for years when i was younger, and that's why i moved back, she just isn't helpful at all with me and my horse and can not wait to see her leave. Karma needs a place where the trainer will work with her, and her feed and environment is flexible and that's mostly why i'm selling her, i'd rather see her go to a home where she's catered to personally than treated as one of a heard than stay with me because I have no where else to take her, I just want to work with her as much as I can before she leaves.

I try and stay calm and collected whenever I can because karma is a sensitive horse, and she picks up on my attitude quickly and me freaking out doesn't help her at all. She's had a lot of retraining, two solid months with me (before we moved and she had this attitude change) at another barn, with another trainer, and almost a year under a friend of mine and her trainer, they did some basic dressage stuff, but she was trained more with force than respect.
 

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You need a trainer willing to work with you and your horse...

Agree with tinyliny though. That good mannered horse is still there, but you need to figure out how to bring her back AND have her listen to you.
 

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I try and stay calm and collected whenever I can because karma is a sensitive horse, and she picks up on my attitude quickly and me freaking out doesn't help her at all. She's had a lot of retraining, two solid months with me (before we moved and she had this attitude change) at another barn, with another trainer, and almost a year under a friend of mine and her trainer, they did some basic dressage stuff, but she was trained more with force than respect.
If you do sell her that's on you and sounds like it may be best. I just didn't want to think you were selling her due to the issues you are having and only those issues.

I think right there you found the problem. The issue isn't Karma the issue is whatever's upsetting her. I stand with what I said of just working on slow and calm and not worrying about working her so much atm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Update

So anyways, first time I played with her at the new barn, and she was just literally...awful, oh my. I wanted to walk her around the place and her her used to things and i took her in the ring (she'd been in covered rings, and even completely indoor rings before) but she wouldn't stand still because the stallion kept whinnying and so did she and she kept wanting to run me over and i'd make her back up and out of my space but that got her more wound up, so I tried letting her off the lead to canter around for a bit and get her energy out, but that made it worse. She's never really been a herd bound horse and I was patient with her and calm and just tried to get her to settle down and listen to me until she decided that she wanted to kick me then I really got after her and made her think i was gonna eat her for breakfast because I don't care what she does or how she's feeling she has no right to kick at me. Eventually she quieted down after me working with her for another twenty minutes or so and we walked quietly back to her pasture. All the horses are wound up right now though because it's a new place, and all their routines have been changed, but I just don't know what to do with her...I've got people looking at her this weekend to possibly buy her, but I want her to be that sweet quiet horse I used to know and not whatever this is now.
Reminder: I did all her retraining for the most part and I did everything that I used to do with her when I started training her and restarted everything and nothing has worked. :-|:-(
 

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Horses need time to adjust to new surroundings. It sounds like she's more focused on the horses in the barn than you. If she won't slow from the canter, allow her to keep going and going and going until she decides she wants to slow. Now is the time to urge her on and keep her going until she feels like she's dragging a big anchor then without using the reins, take a deep breath and settle into the saddle (stop riding). I promise you she'll me more than happy to stop. Do keep her walking so she doesn't get a buildup of lactic acid in her muscles. When her breathing has returned to normal, canter her again and repeat the exercise if you have to. Remember, no reins for stopping, just deep breath and relaxing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Horses need time to adjust to new surroundings. It sounds like she's more focused on the horses in the barn than you. If she won't slow from the canter, allow her to keep going and going and going until she decides she wants to slow. Now is the time to urge her on and keep her going until she feels like she's dragging a big anchor then without using the reins, take a deep breath and settle into the saddle (stop riding). I promise you she'll me more than happy to stop. Do keep her walking so she doesn't get a buildup of lactic acid in her muscles. When her breathing has returned to normal, canter her again and repeat the exercise if you have to. Remember, no reins for stopping, just deep breath and relaxing.
Her canter isn't a canter, it's more of a gallop currently (oh the joys of owning an ex race horse) She won't stand still even for tacking or grooming currently, and she's a very anxious high strung horse and just running her ragged doesn't work very well as it just gets her keyed up.
 

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What I would do if this was my horse would be to leave her alone. Give her food water turnout, let her get used to the routine but don't do anything else. Slowly once she is completely settled take her out, walk around. Then add grooming sessions. Then once you are handling her daily and she is completely relaxed with those things (remember calm and slow is the whole point!) start doing ground work. Once she is completely relaxed with that (work up to lunging and stuff) start "retraining" do basic saddle stuff, get on and off, THEN start riding her. AT A WALK. Again relaxed, walk around the property. Have fun. Dont' ask her to do anything. When ready to do more ask for bending, giving to the bit, etc. THEN trot, again, leisurely, you are having fun not work. Follow this pattern, when she is relaxed wtc and happy being ridden then you can start doing basic training stuff with a competent trainer that click with the horse. If she gets tense praise her for ay sort of release then once you have that quickly take a step back and don't push her again until she's ready. Slow slow slow, and relaxed, no rush, no training, happy gentle handling. You are teaching her to relax and have fun. I totally get that this may not work for you, especially if you already have people coming out to try her, but that's just what I'd do. If you do have people come out I wouldn't push her, just explain to them that it's a new place and she hasn't settled in yet, that she is a super sweet quiet horse but is sensitive and that this transition has been hard for her.

I would not try to do any work until she is comfortable just being there and then just walk around for starters (on the ground).
 
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