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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so yesterday we went to a gymkhana, Domino has an issue with wanting to go fast and not listening to me or following the courses.

In the beggining you have to do a circle before you start. He starts off good, in a slow trot, but as soon as hes rounding the turn he takes off and wont listen to me. He wont slow down. I mean its good that he likes to go fast but he needs to follow the courses before we start on the speed.

So anyway I cant get him to slow down or listen. So my guestion is how DO I get him to go the way im telling him to. Or at least having him slow down enough that he will listen
 

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What I always do is turn them in a small to medium sized circle, but not necessarily a one-rein stop. When turned in a circle the horse pretty much has to listen to you, and will slowly spiral down. He may continue to trot in that circle for 5 times around, but eventually he will realize that he is ending up right back where he started and there is no purpose in that.

They eventually catch in :D Horses don't like to do anything unnessesary if possible.
 

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I would put him in shoulder-fore. It redirects his line of travel and he can't take off with you. It also helps establish the inside leg to outside rein connection that is vital to communicating to your horse.
 

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Hm. Make sure his bit is alright. Does he usually speed up? you want him to do what you want him to do , so make sure you have a tight enough grip
 

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I can't exactly recommend anything, since I don't know the horse, but I can say this.
To avoid having as many situations like this in the first place, you must train (without being harsh; we don't want him listening out of fear) him to listen. Doing different exercises in your schoolings/warm-ups that really stimulate the horse's mind will make him feel more inclined to listen to you.
For example, transitions. Lots and lots of trasitions. When my thoroughbred Freddy is either blocking me out or anticipating me (meaning, he'll do something before I even ask for it), I'll do this.
It starts out with walk-trot-walk-trot, then start throwing in every transtition. Make it random, such as walk-halt-trot-canter-halt-canter-trot. The time between transitions is varied from six strides to one stride, to three then back to six for example. Really jumble it up. Make your aids extremely clear and consistant, keep him balanced and round, and avoid confusing him. Take it slow at first, because it may take him monthes to get fit enough to be physically able to do all these transitions. You may start out with a horse that is surprised with the constant changing of gaits, but if you do it right, you'll end up with a horse that is listening more and connected to you. It also really helps teach him to stay underneath himself during transitions and figure out how to balance better.

But it's literally impossible to keep a horse attentive in every situation
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well ya. He doesnt act like this at home. So theres really nothing I cantpractice. Its only when he's in the arena at a show. Even when he's in the warm up arena he is fine. But as soon as he gets in the big arena his attention is gone.
 

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When my OTTB sees a deer out on the trails and suddenly stops thinking and starts reacting instead, I leg yeild him back and forth. It engages his hind end and drives him into the outside rein effectively putting him on the bit. In most cases it quickly gets his attention back focused on me.
 

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Doing exercises that incline the horse to listen to you is good for them anyway. It can prepare both you and the horse for the situations you meet in the show ring anyway. A responsive and attentive horse (this does not mean an active/hot horse) is more willing to get back on track when you tell him with your aids, "Hey, I'm not fooling around here. Listen to me."
I like MBP's leg yielding idea. Riding inside leg to outside rein in general is the more correct way to ride for the engagement of bend (versus inside rein to inside leg) in the first place.
If he takes off slightly, sit deep and massage the reins (don't pull or lean!), bring him back, and continue what you were doing. The best thing you can do is carry on without getting frustrated or tense, and eventually you will discourage him from playing this game, and teach him to come back to you with ease.
 

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I agree with dressagelxee. The biggest trick is staying calm and not getting frustruated. It's waaayyy easier said than done. Everyone of us has been there when our horse's are pitching a fit for what seems like no good reason. Once you have the appropriate tools in your pocket on how to handle your horse's particular situation, you'll have a better chance of staying cool in the saddle and just doing what you need to do rather than react to your horse's antics.
 
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