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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I am a new horse owner and have never had to pay to get him trimmed and shoed yet. I've been wondering how much it is going to cost. If anyone could give me a rough estimate I would really appreciate it.

Thanks
 

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Trimmings for me are $40 a horse and fronts are $100ish as for all around is only 10 bucks more.

Prices vary from state to state but its a general idea on how much it would cost. Sometimes you can find it cheaper n sometimes....eh...you cant.
 

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I'm in central WA, trims here are 35-40 and shoeing is 85-on up
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Okay thanks guys this helps a lot I didn't realize how much this horse was going to cost me lol but he's been worth every penny so far.
 

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I am also in WA, but Western. Trims are about $35 to $40. Shoes run the whole gambit depending on how does your horse. I have it cost as little as $65 for fronts (which my horse will get tomorrow) to $280 for eggbars fronts. I would say that a 'normal' range for shoes on all four around here runs about $85 to $200.

I always make sure to ask before scheduling the farrier. And price does not always mean good or bad work... the last one I had I was paying $120 for fronts and he lamed my horse. The current farrier was actually able to look past my horse's color and understand that he is NOT a paint horse, but a sadddlebred and has different angles needed for comfortable movement.
 

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Unless your horse really needs shoes, keep him barefoot. His hooves will be healthier. Don't shoe because "someone" said he needs shoes. A reputable farrier won't shoe unless there's a problem or if the owner insists.
 

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Unless your horse really needs shoes, keep him barefoot. His hooves will be healthier. Don't shoe because "someone" said he needs shoes. A reputable farrier won't shoe unless there's a problem or if the owner insists.
I wouldn't just pull shoes off because someone says "barefoot" is healthier either. It depends upon the workload, as shoes provide protection and absorb shock. I wore into the soles on my mare's back feet trying to keep her barefoot behind.

This is the first time the OP is getting his/her horse shod, and might possibly be the first time the farrier has ever shod this horse. The best option is to keep it simple and do something that is already working for a few shoeings to let everyone get to know each other (OP, Horse, & Farrier) before trying to change things up. Unless the farrier says "this horse's feet are so messed up I'd advise pulling these shoes and going barefoot" I'd try to stick to what's already been working until everyone is better acquainted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I wouldn't just pull shoes off because someone says "barefoot" is healthier either. It depends upon the workload, as shoes provide protection and absorb shock. I wore into the soles on my mare's back feet trying to keep her barefoot behind.

This is the first time the OP is getting his/her horse shod, and might possibly be the first time the farrier has ever shod this horse. The best option is to keep it simple and do something that is already working for a few shoeings to let everyone get to know each other (OP, Horse, & Farrier) before trying to change things up. Unless the farrier says "this horse's feet are so messed up I'd advise pulling these shoes and going barefoot" I'd try to stick to what's already been working until everyone is better acquainted.
Yeah we trail ride quite a bit and cross roads and even ride the road to get to different trails so that's my reason for getting shoes put on.
 
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