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I......LOVE YOU!!!!!!! THANK YOU!!!!!! I am only 16 and jobless. I would rather have a horse instead of a trainer and NO $$ to afford the horse lol:lol:
You sound just like me when I was 16. I couldn't find a job until I was almost 17, and even then I made minimum wage (which isn't much). And I remember I always wanted to go to the barn to watch and learn from the trainers, but I had no car! Sure my dad would drive me to the barn every now and again but normally they just got home late from work and didn't want to do anything. I can't imagine life without having a car now, but when I was younger you couldn't do anything without one.. and had to depend on your parents for everything.

If you can, see if you can find a local trainer to watch for free :) I always was so envious of the girls (more like their parents) who could afford to board, train, and have everything. I had to work for everything and I wouldn't take it back for the world! That's what made me who I am today, and someday you will look back and say the same thing. I lived alone with my father and he was a construction worker, and we could afford to keep our two horses but not get one trained at the same time. I love my dad, he's the one who kept me interested in horses and taught me the value of a dollar.

I work at a barn now and I got offered to train/board my horse instead of getting paid (which sucks because now I will have to pick up a second job) but it's worth it.
 

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White Foot,

That's terrific that you got good results with your horse. However, I'm going to assume that you were working with a green horse, not a reclaim. A horse off the track is a *reclaim*, and that is much more difficult than a green horse.

And I personally think that reclaiming a OTTSB is harder than reclaiming an OTTTB. Though it's difficult, OTTTBs can pretty quickly be taught to supple and bend. An OTTSB assumes that bending is going to *hurt*. Every horse broken to drive learns the painful lesson early that if they try to bend, they get poked by a shaft. Overcoming that resistance requires trust, tact and IMO, experience.

Horseychick, I think the thing you have going for you here is your horse's overall disposition and temperment. He's clearly a good, kind and willing guy or you wouldn't have gotten as far as you have. HOWEVER, this is not a quick fix. Your horse needs to be reschooled as a riding horse. There just isn't a magic wand for that. I am totally sympathetic to not having tons of money to work with; but I really want to make the point that whatever training method you undertake (books, video, advice on the internet, instructor, trainer, friend) HAS TO deal with, first and foremost 1.) reschooling a racehorse and 2.) reschooling a driving horse as a riding horse.
Gunther was a green horse. I also work the NY chapter of the Rerun program for OTTB. It all depends on the personality of the horse, I've seen green horses that it would take a miracle to try and train and I've seen some of the TB's come in that are starving and beaten that pick up on training sessions like nothing.

With that being said I've had no experience with retraining a harness horse.
 

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If you don't have the money to put into getting him retrained then you should not have him, IMO. Sell him and buy a horse that you can ride and enjoy at your level or that is trained to the level you want to ride at. People with limited training experience trying to retrain OTT horses is not a good idea. It usually ends badly for both horse and rider.
I don't agree with this. If this was the case then I and others would have sold their horses a long, long time ago. If someone doesn't have the money for a trainer that means they have to work harder and study harder to try and fix the problems themselves. If someone doesn't have the money for food, it would be a different story. I could easily afford a farrier but I hated spending my money on something I could do myself for free. So what did I do? I studied, learned, and watched, how to trim horses feet. Now I do their feet by myself.
 

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Harness horses (STBS) are not the same to train as TBs.

My friend has owned many STBS - all of them right off the track. She's been riding for YEARS, yet she ALWAYS has her Standies sent to a professional trainer before she rides them. It's a whole different level of training than with a riding racing horse.

I second getting a professional to help you out. Maybe you can do some work in exchange for a training session? (Assuming the trainer has a stable or facility with horses - stalls always have to be cleaned!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
I don't agree with this. If this was the case then I and others would have sold their horses a long, long time ago. If someone doesn't have the money for a trainer that means they have to work harder and study harder to try and fix the problems themselves. If someone doesn't have the money for food, it would be a different story. I could easily afford a farrier but I hated spending my money on something I could do myself for free. So what did I do? I studied, learned, and watched, how to trim horses feet. Now I do their feet by myself.
Yeah, what she said about not having the $$ for a trainer = me should not have horse:shock: really ticked me off.:-x:-x:-x:-x:-x Its not like he will roll over and die without a trainer. My horses are happy and I love them and take care of them better than a lot of ppl I see. Just because I dont have the $$ for a trainer does not mean I shouldnt have him. That is nonsense.:roll: I would rather have the horse trained by me, that way, he gets to eat lol :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
[/QUOTE] Maybe you can do some work in exchange for a training session? (Assuming the trainer has a stable or facility with horses - stalls always have to be cleaned!)[/QUOTE]

Thanks! That is a great idea! Never thought of that one!!!!!
 

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Has he been retrained? If not, pulling back on the reins for a race horse means you want them to go faster. That's why it's so very important for an ex-racer to be retrained once they come off the track.

Why are you using double reins since you're only trail riding? Is there any particular reason you're using a mullen mouth and a flash noseband? Unless you're showing, there's no real reason for you to use such equipment.

When was the last time you had his teeth checked? Besides the mullen being rather severe, his chewing may be because his teeth need to be floated.

As far as the pawing, it probably means he's still full of beans and wants to go. Sounds like he needs more exercise than you're giving him.

Many horses do the belly blow up when they're being girthed. It's a learned behaviour, and not likely something you can unteach him. What I've found works best is to get the horse girthed, let them relax, and then tighten more by degrees.

Lungeing will often get them to relax, and you can tighten the girth then.

You sound relatively inexperienced. That's not a bad thing, because none of us started out in horses knowing anything. It just appears that you don't really have a clue why your horse is giving you trouble.

It does appear that your horse is overbitted, may need his teeth done, possibly needs more training, and might be a tad spoiled.

If you're not already working with a trainer for yourself, I'd suggest that too. You both could probably use the help of a good professional.
^^^ What they said! :D

A prof. trainer suggested the pelham to relax the jaw and so far it has worked well for him as the snaffle pulls his head up and hollows his back. The flash is to keep his mouth shut. His teeth were very recently done. He is retired. Has been for a while. He knows that rein pressure means stop. he only throws his head up in the field when he is heading towards the barn. I have no money for a trainer so that is why I came here
The flash should NOT be used to FORCE his mouth shut. You should never, EVER have to force your horse to keep it's mouth shut.

He doesn't sound like he knows that rein pressure means stop. Also you said he throws his head when going towards the barn, is he barn sour or herd bound?

When he was jumping he was being a brat because he was really hyper and I was trying to slow him down lol. I don't think there are any saddle fitters in my area.
Why on earth are you jumping this horse? :shock:

There is no need to be rude or dismissive though... you asked a question, and people are giving you answers...
Agreed! We can't give you the answers you want because that involves shelling no money out and...horses cost money. Training cost money. Their health costs money. Basically, don't buy a horse and expect to not go broke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 · (Edited)
The thing is that something needs to change; you need to learn how to work and retrain this horse, and please get the saddle fit checked. I would suggest going to a simple snaffle (preferably a double jointed bit with cheeks, I suggest a dee ring french link for this horse) and ditching the flash, as it is being used incorrectly. People on the internet can only help so much; you want someone right there with you to teach you how to retrain this horse, you need that constant, immediate feedback. DVDs are good... to a point. There is no feedback, so you could be doing something wrong and never know it.
Would this be a good bit to go with? http://lbdamron.com/Dee_Ring_Horse_Bit_1277-p6028.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
He doesn't sound like he knows that rein pressure means stop. Also you said he throws his head when going towards the barn, is he barn sour or herd bound?

I think just eager to go back to the barn


Why on earth are you jumping this horse? :shock:

Why not? there is nothing wrong with jumping my horse. We were jumping and at the end of the jump was a turn so I had to slow him down



Agreed! We can't give you the answers you want because that involves shelling no money out and...horses cost money. Training cost money. Their health costs money. Basically, don't buy a horse and expect to not go broke.
You have to have money to spend it. I am 16 and dont have a job so what DO you expect me to do? Cant pull it out of my butt.
 

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You have to have money to spend it. I am 16 and dont have a job so what DO you expect me to do? Cant pull it out of my butt.
Every horse is eager to get back to the barn. Not all of them throw their heads...

If you are having all of these issues with your horse, you should NOT be jumping.
Can you walk, trot AND canter your horse with no problem whatsoever?
 

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Stick a fork in me, I'm done.

I would like to strongly suggest that every serious horseperson with actual hands on experience now stay out of this thread, which is exactly what I plan to do from now on.

Apparently the OP only wants to hear from sympathetic teenagers, not people who actually have the experience or ability to help.

Oh, and don't make any suggestions about anything that might cost money.

That should leave a lot of latitude for constructive advice.
 

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I agree that she shouldn't be jumping him, but everyone needs to think about what they were like when they were 16. Were not all lucky to have parents that pay for everything! And if people are suggesting she gets a job they obviously haven't tried to job search in this economy, esp being her age it would be hard for her to find a job. It took me close to a year to find a job, I started searching when I was 16 and didn't get one until I was almost 17.

We've all made out share of mistakes. When I first bought my horse I was riding her in oversized tack and an old rusty bit.

Maura, you're the one who isn't listening. What good will it do forcing the "you need money$!$" thing on her when she obviously doesn't have any????? Please answer me that question. I HAVE experience, I work at a boarding facility, I help train horses, and I work at a Rerun program. I'm trying to HELP her, not bash her head because she doesn't have the ability to pay. That's exactly what won't help her.

A person with EXPERIENCE would learn how to work AROUND what is stopping them from getting trainer. And in her case it's the money.
 

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All good points above but it also sounds to me like you are riding primarily with the bridle and not from your seat. It is my suspicion that if this horse has been retrained, he may have been retrained by someone who does ride from the seat which would mean you are missing some of your cues and confusing him, which means you may also find he doesn't turn like you would like him to either.

When you ask him to slow down or stop shift some of your weight slightly back like you are trying to sit on the back pockets of your pants and brace against your own inner core (stomach muscles). Instead of pulling or yanking on the mouth gently create a "road block" so to speak instead...and gently add pressure with the reins until he gives you what you want, then resume correct position and release all pressure. Be sure to tell him Whoa assertively, as well.

A good exercise also is to practice stopping on the ground with a halter and then in the arena mounted. Have him stop in different places all the time and with every stop try to get him to back at least 2 steps. Eventually he will start anticipating that he will need to back up soon and constantly listen for your cues and pay more attention to you. Do this at a walk at first on the ground with a halter then progress to the arena and gradually work up through the gaits.
 
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