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White Foot,

At no point did I mention money, or that she had to spend money. Please go back and read my posts. My focus was on understanding WHY the horse is acting this way; and why it's important to understand that in order to fix the problem, and that it's not a quick fix.

Nowhere did I mention money, or insist that she have to have a professional trainer.

This thread is titled, in part "cry for help",

You have to have money to spend it. I am 16 and dont have a job so what DO you expect me to do? Cant pull it out of my butt
This makes me think that the OP is not serious in her request for help.
 

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Here's my suggestion; keep in mind, I am 19, currently jobless, and living at home. I have an OTTB in need of lots of emotional rehab, not necessarily under saddle rehab. I lost my job right as Ice started seeing a trainer, so the months of "therapy" that he was going to get turned into a few weekends. She then showed me what I could do with him to get it back to the point where we could start doing ground work, and then start working under saddle. Still, I call her when I'm unsure of something and she comes out and watches me, then shows me if need be.

Find someone near you who has experience with schooling OTTSBs, and offer to clean stalls for them in exchange for a reduced training package--i.e. showing YOU what to do and how to do it correctly. Buy your bit, and then save up whatever allowance you get. Until then, don't ride him....just work on the basics. You can teach him to bend from the ground, which will help in basically everything. I'm betting he also has issues with yielding his forequarters. See if you can get him doing that on your own, and then when you have enough money see the trainer. At least for a month.

Also, that bit is fine. The roller might even reduce some of his mouth gaping and chewing, because he has something to entertain himself with.
 

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White Foot,

At no point did I mention money, or that she had to spend money. Please go back and read my posts. My focus was on understanding WHY the horse is acting this way; and why it's important to understand that in order to fix the problem, and that it's not a quick fix.

Nowhere did I mention money, or insist that she have to have a professional trainer.

This thread is titled, in part "cry for help",


Justsambam, I agree with you and I like your approach.


This makes me think that the OP is not serious in her request for help.
"Oh, and don't make any suggestions about anything that might cost money." :-| I think this was mentioning money.

I fully understand where you're coming from, but I can also understand where she's coming from. Just put yourself in her shoes, unless, your parents paid for all your thing then you would never understand the situation at hand. I think we're all getting frustrated and need to take a deep breathe. I know at the young age of 16 I got frustrated easily :lol: that's why school and I never mixed well together.
 

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^^White Foot, if her parents were not willing to pay for training, it probably would have been in their best interests to just get her a dog.

If the horse doesn't need training, you usually do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Stick a fork in me, I'm done.

I would like to strongly suggest that every serious horseperson with actual hands on experience now stay out of this thread, which is exactly what I plan to do from now on.

Apparently the OP only wants to hear from sympathetic teenagers, not people who actually have the experience or ability to help.

Oh, and don't make any suggestions about anything that might cost money.

That should leave a lot of latitude for constructive advice.
Sorry but I dont have the money to spend! Is that such a sin?
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Every horse is eager to get back to the barn. Not all of them throw their heads...

If you are having all of these issues with your horse, you should NOT be jumping.
Can you walk, trot AND canter your horse with no problem whatsoever?
I can do anything with him anywhere else but the field. I usu. ride on the rd.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
I agree that she shouldn't be jumping him, but everyone needs to think about what they were like when they were 16. Were not all lucky to have parents that pay for everything! And if people are suggesting she gets a job they obviously haven't tried to job search in this economy, esp being her age it would be hard for her to find a job. It took me close to a year to find a job, I started searching when I was 16 and didn't get one until I was almost 17.

We've all made out share of mistakes. When I first bought my horse I was riding her in oversized tack and an old rusty bit.

Maura, you're the one who isn't listening. What good will it do forcing the "you need money$!$" thing on her when she obviously doesn't have any????? Please answer me that question. I HAVE experience, I work at a boarding facility, I help train horses, and I work at a Rerun program. I'm trying to HELP her, not bash her head because she doesn't have the ability to pay. That's exactly what won't help her.

A person with EXPERIENCE would learn how to work AROUND what is stopping them from getting trainer. And in her case it's the money.
Thanks for the understanding. I was jumping him in the fence, not the field so he was great (but being hyper)
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
All good points above but it also sounds to me like you are riding primarily with the bridle and not from your seat. It is my suspicion that if this horse has been retrained, he may have been retrained by someone who does ride from the seat which would mean you are missing some of your cues and confusing him, which means you may also find he doesn't turn like you would like him to either.

When you ask him to slow down or stop shift some of your weight slightly back like you are trying to sit on the back pockets of your pants and brace against your own inner core (stomach muscles). Instead of pulling or yanking on the mouth gently create a "road block" so to speak instead...and gently add pressure with the reins until he gives you what you want, then resume correct position and release all pressure. Be sure to tell him Whoa assertively, as well.

A good exercise also is to practice stopping on the ground with a halter and then in the arena mounted. Have him stop in different places all the time and with every stop try to get him to back at least 2 steps. Eventually he will start anticipating that he will need to back up soon and constantly listen for your cues and pay more attention to you. Do this at a walk at first on the ground with a halter then progress to the arena and gradually work up through the gaits.
I retrained him lol :) Ooooohhh! Wonderful advice! I will be sure to try that! Thanks a lot!!!!!!:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
White Foot,

At no point did I mention money, or that she had to spend money. Please go back and read my posts. My focus was on understanding WHY the horse is acting this way; and why it's important to understand that in order to fix the problem, and that it's not a quick fix.

Nowhere did I mention money, or insist that she have to have a professional trainer.

This thread is titled, in part "cry for help",



This makes me think that the OP is not serious in her request for help.
I am serious, just frustrated that some are stressing "hire a trainer" after I have mentioned that I dont have money
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
Here's my suggestion; keep in mind, I am 19, currently jobless, and living at home. I have an OTTB in need of lots of emotional rehab, not necessarily under saddle rehab. I lost my job right as Ice started seeing a trainer, so the months of "therapy" that he was going to get turned into a few weekends. She then showed me what I could do with him to get it back to the point where we could start doing ground work, and then start working under saddle. Still, I call her when I'm unsure of something and she comes out and watches me, then shows me if need be.

Find someone near you who has experience with schooling OTTSBs, and offer to clean stalls for them in exchange for a reduced training package--i.e. showing YOU what to do and how to do it correctly. Buy your bit, and then save up whatever allowance you get. Until then, don't ride him....just work on the basics. You can teach him to bend from the ground, which will help in basically everything. I'm betting he also has issues with yielding his forequarters. See if you can get him doing that on your own, and then when you have enough money see the trainer. At least for a month.

Also, that bit is fine. The roller might even reduce some of his mouth gaping and chewing, because he has something to entertain himself with.
Okay!!!!
 

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It isn't that they aren't hearing you - it is that the problems you are having are problems that need to be addressed with the help of a trainer. The situation you are in is not one that you can muddle through yourself - for your sake or your horse's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
^^White Foot, if her parents were not willing to pay for training, it probably would have been in their best interests to just get her a dog.

If the horse doesn't need training, you usually do.
Ummm, that is kind of harsh. I may be young but I am not stupid lol. I know the basics. I started him out but I just need some help with fine tuning. I was told that when racing, he had his head strapped up in the air so that may be the prob. And BTW, I do have a dog. They bought me horses for a reason, for emotional therapy. They just dont have the extra $$ to spend when with the proper guidance, I can fix these problems myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
It isn't that they aren't hearing you - it is that the problems you are having are problems that need to be addressed with the help of a trainer. The situation you are in is not one that you can muddle through yourself - for your sake or your horse's.
I admit, I do need trainer advice. But I cannot have one come out as I have no $$
 

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Okay, now I have a problem....you say that you're 16, no job, your parents pay for everything, and yet you retrained him? No, you sit on him and you're lucky he hasn't killed you yet. I'm betting he was cheap, which is why your parents agreed to pay for him in the first place. What kind of riding experience do you have to make that statement--regardless, obviously you didn't "retrain" him very well, or you wouldn't be crying for help, you wouldn't have problems with controlling him, rushing into jumps (onto the road, which is INCREDIBLY stupid, might I add), and you would know that you don't throw a curb bit on a horse before they're absolutely PERFECT in some type of snaffle.

I bought an off the track horse, but I understood what I was getting in to. I understood that at some point I was going to hit a wall and have to get a trainer. I'm a rider, but I'm not a trainer. When that time came, I submitted to everything, got a trainer even though it killed my bank account, but I know that I'll have a nice horse at the end of this. When we advocate getting a trainer, we understand that you don't have money, but what you need to understand is that point blank, its so you don't kill yourself. That would be unfair to your horse, who your parents would undoubtedly blame, and then he would be unrightfully put down. Talk to your parents, (who I bet aren't horse people) and if they can't see that you NEED a trainer, then you should think of selling.

"Knowing the basics" is like saying you know how to climb a tree, so why not climb a mountain without a harness?
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
Okay, now I have a problem....you say that you're 16, no job, your parents pay for everything, and yet you retrained him? No, you sit on him and you're lucky he hasn't killed you yet. I'm betting he was cheap, which is why your parents agreed to pay for him in the first place. What kind of riding experience do you have to make that statement--regardless, obviously you didn't "retrain" him very well, or you wouldn't be crying for help, you wouldn't have problems with controlling him, rushing into jumps (onto the road, which is INCREDIBLY stupid, might I add), and you would know that you don't throw a curb bit on a horse before they're absolutely PERFECT in some type of snaffle.

I bought an off the track horse, but I understood what I was getting in to. I understood that at some point I was going to hit a wall and have to get a trainer. I'm a rider, but I'm not a trainer. When that time came, I submitted to everything, got a trainer even though it killed my bank account, but I know that I'll have a nice horse at the end of this. When we advocate getting a trainer, we understand that you don't have money, but what you need to understand is that point blank, its so you don't kill yourself. That would be unfair to your horse, who your parents would undoubtedly blame, and then he would be unrightfully put down. Talk to your parents, (who I bet aren't horse people) and if they can't see that you NEED a trainer, then you should think of selling.

"Knowing the basics" is like saying you know how to climb a tree, so why not climb a mountain without a harness?
This horse IS trained.
I trained him well and he can be ridden by even my 9 yr old cousin. His training is not the problem. This horse was free but that is not why they agreed to get him. We all know what we were getting into. I have been riding for 8 yrs. I am not just sitting on him and lucky I am not getting killed. He is trained. He does the best on the road. I can rie him tackless on the road with just a strap around his neck. He is fine. Do NOT insult me or call me STUPID!!!! I was instructed by a professional trainer to put him in a pelham so I did. I used the curb rein VERY sparingly. NO horse is going to be "perfect in a snaffle". I HAD him in a snaffle before the pelham and he went TERRIBLY in it. With his pelham he is relaxed. He just gets excitable in the field. Even if I died riding him, they love him and they would NEVER euthanize him. It seems as though your method is giving up when things go wrong. If I don't have the $$ to buy a trainer, sell the horse. This horse is not going to die without a trainer. He is a trail horse, not a show horse.
 

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I have a 21 year old horse that I recently got. He has had the same owner all his life and she needed a good home for him because she was getting too old to ride him. He has been trained by numerous professionals and i have rode him at her indoor arena several times before we brought him home. The first couple times I rode him when we got him home went great.....but now he won't turn, won't walk into certain pastures and will go into a trot without me telling him. He has also broke into a canter when we are in a trot. He was trained with spurs and i use them too.....but it doesn't help. Now if I want to turn i have to stop him first and did my leg/spur in his side, and yank on the reins to get him to go, and sometimes he still wont......I'm not sure why he does this and if anybody has any advice for me...please help.....like you I am losing my patience with him but I hate to because he is such a great and gentle horse.
 

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I like this bit, but not for a horse that already chews. The copper roller in the middle there encourages a horse to play with the bit - not something you want for an already mouthy horse. The price makes me think that it might not be the best quality either.
If you don't mind shelling out a bit for a bit (haha) here's a fantastic bit: Mikmar Bit Company
(The Mikmar D-Ring Ergöm Lozenge Snaffle)
The Cupreon will make the horse like the taste and foam, but won't encourage him to play or mouth the bit. I also like the idea of a bean link rather than a true french link.
Otherwise, perhaps try something like this:
JP Bits by KORSTEEL - Hunter Dee with Oval Mouth Dee Ring Bits English HorseLoverZ.com
or
JP Bits by KORSTEEL - Hunter Dee with Copper Oval Link Dee Ring Bits English HorseLoverZ.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
I like this bit, but not for a horse that already chews. The copper roller in the middle there encourages a horse to play with the bit - not something you want for an already mouthy horse. The price makes me think that it might not be the best quality either.
If you don't mind shelling out a bit for a bit (haha) here's a fantastic bit: Mikmar Bit Company
(The Mikmar D-Ring Ergöm Lozenge Snaffle)
The Cupreon will make the horse like the taste and foam, but won't encourage him to play or mouth the bit. I also like the idea of a bean link rather than a true french link.
Otherwise, perhaps try something like this:
JP Bits by KORSTEEL - Hunter Dee with Oval Mouth Dee Ring Bits English HorseLoverZ.com
or
JP Bits by KORSTEEL - Hunter Dee with Copper Oval Link Dee Ring Bits English HorseLoverZ.com
Ooooh! THANKS!!!! Some happy stuff comes out of this hair whitening stressful tread lol
 
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