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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My three year old colt has had some scarring on his left hind like he had a fence injury up on the cornet but didn't ever seem to bother him and I never thought much of it even when picking his feet and getting him ready for his first set of shoes(he hasn't had feet handled that much).

Anyhow right before he was to be shod we had to go to CA for a couple of weeks due to a family emergency and he got turned back out. Wednesday I go to bring him back in and the outside rear quarter of his hoof wall had separated and come off. See pictures below, sorry about the quality.

Just wanted some different opinions on growing it back out and future care if he were your horse.
 

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Wow, that heel looks weird, like he is on high heels. I guess I would clean it and soak it and wait til it heals, then try to get that high heel down.
 

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Sorry, can't really tell much from those pics... except that it looks ouchie! Better lighting & clean hoof would help. Looks like there was more damage to that hoof & also they appear to be underrun, high heels. If this happened due to the previous 'fault' I suspect there's probably some major seedy infection in there too & combined with the bad mechanics this caused it to get ripped off.

Basically I'd be inclined to get a good vet out. While initially you may need to use iodine or other antiseptic, I'd be inclined to minimise the use of that, as it can retar d the healing & damage the corium so that horn may not grow well. Instead I treat hoof wounds with Manuka honey.

I'd be waiting for it to be properly healed & new horn grown down before considering shoes. But then I wouldn't be shoeing a baby or horse with hoof problems like that in the first place, but would wait for maturity & wait until hooves were in good shape.
 

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He needs those heels kept trimmed as short as possible. Length will be the injured area's worst enemy as it leverages the sections apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Completely agree that he needs to be kept short for the sake of keeping the wall intact. This is a newly acquired horse that was started as a two year old then turned out to mature and I bought him a little over a month ago, put a few rides on him and working with his feet for hubby to put some shoes on so I could start using him on easier days outside. Due to a family emergency we were unable to get him trimmed and shod sooner unfortunately. Hubby who is my shoer :), basically said the same- get him and keep him correct, turn him out, keep an eye on it.
He has to shoe a lot of horses on top of work so he is not much on keeping horses that are going to require a lot of maintenance. I really like this colt and want to keep him. He may be small but very athletic, quick and wants to be a big stopper so I want to give him the best chance possible.
We got done early today and I was going to take some better pictures but he accidently was sorted to get turned back out in the big pasture. I will catch him back up in the next few days(if we get done early enough) and get some better pictures.

Thanks for the input :)
 

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I don't think I would put shoes on him for a while. Shoeing him won't help get those heels down or help with them being underun. I would try to get the shape corrected first and go from there.

If he needs shoes because he is tenderfooted being correctly balanced will actually go along way to help with that and you may find he won't need shoes at all
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't think I would put shoes on him for a while. Shoeing him won't help get those heels down or help with them being underun. I would try to get the shape corrected first and go from there.

If he needs shoes because he is tenderfooted being correctly balanced will actually go along way to help with that and you may find he won't need shoes at all
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He won't get shoes if I am not riding him and I won't ride him until the piece that broke off at the heel has grown back. At this point he is turned out, hubby will get him trimmed up this week hopefully. During the winter we pull all the horses shoes due to the ice and snow anyhow.

Eventually he will need shoes if he goes on payroll (or if I decide to show him he will get sliders) At this point it won't be until next year when we turn the cows out on the mountain.
 
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