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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm considering stalling my two younger horses, Sassy and Dusty, during the day, and switching out with Playboy and Rosie and have them stall at night.
I've noticed Dusty and Sassy chasing Rosie more and more, and at 23 I'm sure she is fed up with them. I want Dusty to stay in during the day to keep his coat from bleaching, and wherever Dusty goes Sassy comes as well. Playboy and Rosie get along perfectly. I'd also like to stall so I only have two horses grazing on the pasture at a time, let it actually grow taller this year (5 acres).

My questions:
Sassy has mild ulcers, would stalling (with hay) affect her in a bad way?
Would it be bad for a senior horse to be stalled for 12 hours?

I have two stalls that I can use and hook up fans to, I also have barn overhangs I have thought about fencing in to use as large stalls. I don't use my round pen hardly ever so I thought about taking it down and making runs for the stalls..


Ooor....what if I stalled everyone during the day and turned out at night? My whole acreage is split in two pastures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
And by younger, I mean 5 & 7 with Dusty and Sassy, Respectively. Lol.
 

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If the horse with ulcers doesn't like being stalled then I would say yes it would affect her in a bad way. Does the senior horse have arthritis? If so, depending on how bad it is, would say don't stall the horse. Movement is good for arthritis. Though if the stall had a run I think that would still give the horse enough room to move around.
 
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I want Dusty to stay in during the day to keep his coat from bleaching, ... I'd also like to stall so I only have two horses grazing on the pasture at a time, let it actually grow taller this year (5 acres).
Coat bleaching is a lot to do with nutrition & health. Good nutrition, adequate copper, etc, will make a horse less susceptible to bleaching. You can also use a light 'sheet' rug to protect his coat if it's so important to you, which would be far preferable to cooping him up.

I would divide the pasture & give areas 'rests' from ALL horses. You could divide it in 3 say, and rest/rotate each for 4 months of the year.

Sassy has mild ulcers, would stalling (with hay) affect her in a bad way?
Would it be bad for a senior horse to be stalled for 12 hours?
Yes. Sometimes of course, stalling is necessary/unavoidable. But it isn't great for horses on a number of levels. Ulcers due to stress/diet/nutrition is one risk. Another is restricting free movement/exercise, especially of arthritic horses.
 

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Personally, I would leave them all out and supplement your pasture with feeding hay. It may seem more expensive, but I think you'll save on health problems in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for the replies! I am taking all of your thoughts into consideration. I swear I'm not trying to be that person who asks for help then sticks to their idea anyway, I'm trying to see what the best options are.

Like the dimbo I am I didn't even think about how stressed the ulcer horse was lasted time she was stalled. Then again, that was at The state fair, lots of people crowding the aisles, she couldn't see her buddy, and there was tornado sirens. Once we put her and her buddy in the same stall together (not safe but didn't have a choice) she was 100X more calmed and relaxed.
Thankfully Rosie only has very very light arthritis and as it is she generally spends a lot of time standing around napping.


Loosie, when the summer is 115 degrees out and with extremely high UV indexes, it fries their hair on their topline, even the tips of the darker horses manes and tails turn Extra crispy lol even my hair gets bleached. They are all very healthy nutritionally. I can't keep fly sheets on them during the summer due to the hormonal heat waves. I couldn't really divide my pasture up like that, due to the fact it would be 4 horses on a 1-2 acre area...and I don't haven't that big of a round pen heheh. That would be straight dirt and weeds in a matter of weeks, and it probably wouldn't grow afterwards because the ground fries so fast here. At least when they are on all 5 acres, they don't start pawing at the ground to dig up roots, everything is dispersed and they have "pooping zones" under the trees where the grass doesn't grow. I'm not going to try to say (and I'm not saying you said this either, lol) I have this awesome grass that comes in every year and that it is tested by the county to be awesome, because it's not. They stay fat and happy on the grass we have. Depending on the weather, we can have a great pasture or have none. If we have none, we have hay. Generally the grass stays about .5-1.5" tall spring-summer-fall, grows in really nice and thick (just not tall since the horses get to it, lol).

I'm considering instead of stalling, fencing in the trailer storage overhang. It's larger than the size of most turnouts/runs that I see. Where it's at, they get breezes and it stays a decent temperature, they can see 80% of the surrounding property. With Playboy and Rosie together, he will move quite a bit and keep her moving. All the horses hangout in there for hours during the summer. Once summer comes around all rides will be in the evening in the dark anyways, and I'll be able to give everyone exercise each day (most of the time, we all know how that works).

This isn't permanent, guess I should have said that, lol. Only for a couple months or so.
 

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Loosie, when the summer is 115 degrees ... I can't keep fly sheets on them during the summer due to the hormonal heat waves.
OK, having had a few weeks like that in the last few years, I reckon you can't even think when it's that hot!:-| But I don't understand the 'hormonal heat wave' comment:?. Why can't you use fly sheets? At any rate, so long as there is access to shade, I just wouldn't coop a horse up(ESPECIALLY in the heat) for 'cosmetic' reasons.

couldn't really divide my pasture up like that, due to the fact it would be 4 horses on a 1-2 acre area...and I don't haven't that big of a round pen heheh. That would be straight dirt and weeds in a matter of weeks, and it probably wouldn't grow afterwards because the ground fries so fast here.
Yep, of course it depends on your climate etc as to what you can/can't do, but you were talking about growing the grass & unless it's rich country, this will really only happen with rests from ANY horses, rather than always having 2 on. Especially in 'hard seasons', even a couple of horses on it permanently will likely only encourage the weeds the horses don't want, because they'll selectively graze the rest. Re they'd always be on dirt, perhaps in the short term, instead of locking them up, you can keep them all on 1/4 acre which will be essentially sacrificed, to the benefit of the rest of the land.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hormal heat waves...100 days straight two summers ago all over 100 degrees (F) with zero rainfall. Then last summer it would be 115 one day, 60 degrees the next, just all over the map. That's what I meant by hormal :D Generally during the heat of the day the horses stay under the sheds and overhangs most of their time.
I cant use fly sheets due to the fact its extremely hot and they would be covered in sweat. They sweat enough as it is just in the pasture! Also, I'm assume because of how nasty dry it is outside, the fly sheets just start shocking the horses with static like crazy! Weirdest thing ever!

As far as "cosmetic" goes, I like to have my horses look their best whenever they enter the show pen. Most show barns around here don't even give their horses an ounce of turnout time. They are constantly stalled with rugs and air conditioning so that their horses will have a perfect, slicked down coat for shows. I frankly don't have the money for that, lol (and really who does?!) :rofl: I tried using some like spray on coat sunscreen, and I never could really tell if it worked or not.


I will probably wind up keeping them on the front half, locking the back half of the pasture up for a while. They have access to free choice hay.
 

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I keep my horses stalled either at night in the winter or during the day in the summer for a variety of reasons and I can't say that I've ever had any health problems with any of them as a result of it - mine get far more stressed about having to stay out in the heat and the bugs than they ever would about standing in the barn with the fans on eating hay.
 
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