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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
When my sister was younger and a green rider she was roped into buying a horse by our trainer at the time. The horse she bought was a decent horse and had a lot of potential. A little much but with the help of a trainer they would have done well. The problem is my sister is too timid of a rider and horsewomen to keep a horse on good behavior on her own. Over the years my sister stopped riding as much (Maybe once every couple months) We ended up having to move the horse home. This lead to the horse picking up bad behavior and getting away with said behavior. With boredom he picked up some hyper active problems. ( Herding our minis and causing them injuries) (think an aggressive friend)

Now he is in his 20s, hasnt been ridden progressively in years. Cant be around any other horse or else he'll hurt himself trying to get to them. Hes scared of everything and very reactive. We are at the point where we have finally convinced her to rehome him. The only problem is how do you rehome a horse like this? With an experienced handler I believe they would be able to get him back on track and would be able to have some good years with him. There are plenty of better horses that have a hard enough time finding homes. In the small chances when I get permission to work with him he responds well, little sensitive but once he figures out hes not getting away with anything he'll stop so I think there is some hope. I am not normally allowed to work with him so any chance of tuning up will have to be put on the new owner.
Any advice?
 

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The biggest problem I can see is his age. I think it would be very unlikely that someone would be willing to put in the time and money it would take to get the horse to be useful, since he is in his 20s.

My opinion is that if he were younger, someone might work with him if they thought he could be used for athletic endeavors.

The things people might want an old horse for, such as calm trail rides or a safe child mount are skills this horse does not and may never have.

A reactive old horse without skills is not desirable just because he had potential when he was young.

My advice would be to let the horse live out his years where he is and has been living. It sounds like he has been kept as an unused or barely used horse for years. If that is still possible financially, it will ensure he does not end up in a bad situation, which is the most likely outcome if he is passed on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The biggest problem I can see is his age. I think it would be very unlikely that someone would be willing to put in the time and money it would take to get the horse to be useful, since he is in his 20s.

My opinion is that if he were younger, someone might work with him if they thought he could be used for athletic endeavors.

The things people might want an old horse for, such as calm trail rides or a safe child mount are skills this horse does not and may never have.

A reactive old horse without skills is not desirable just because he had potential when he was young.

My advice would be to let the horse live out his years where he is and has been living. It sounds like he has been kept as an unused or barely used horse for years. If that is still possible financially, it will ensure he does not end up in a bad situation, which is the most likely outcome if he is passed on.
That is our problem. We need to rehome him. My sister is in college and my parents cannot care for him any longer. They cant afford it and they cant handle him
 

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Quite possibly it is in his best interest to be put down.

This is the kind of horse people send to auction because they think somehow it will turn out OK. So instead of a quick death in a familiar setting, the horse has to go through tumult and scary circumstances, be handled by strangers and experience anxiety, only to still be put down in the end.

Or he could go to a new home where he may be neglected or mistreated because the person didn't realize he would be difficult to handle. Then still potentially go to auction.

Most good and smart horse people would not take on a reactive horse in his twenties. They are thinking his teeth might need expensive work, feed costs might be higher, he probably has arthritis or undiagnosed health problems that will require medication.

That leaves his new potential owners as ignorant or unethical horse people, which means he would almost certainly have a bad time of it.
 

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I was going to respond, but @gottatrot said everything I would have said, and said it better, too. I mean, imagine yourself as a buyer. Under what conditions would you pay money for this horse?
 

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I'll echo what others have said - the few I've met have been great, easygoing horses, and I've owned a part Haffie brumby too, which we bought for my son's second pony - he is fantastic. If I've got a prob with him, it's only that he's 'too smart' - picks things up so quick he's apt to learn mistaken lessons really quick too!

I think depending on who you ask, you'll get bad comments about any breed; QH's & Warmbloods are dumb-as, Arabs and TB's are psycho, schitso, Friesians are stubborn... you name it. I've even heard 'colourist' comments - 'never trust a buckskin or a pally'. And people with these attitudes, because they project that attitude, seem to get what they expect from a horse.
 

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Depends, as with all things horse, depends. Just depends.

Is he upper or lower 20s? Is he sound? Any maintenance meds or supps?

Depending on your answer to those would depend on where you would look for a potential owner. Some rescues are genius at matching a difficult horse to place with an owner that would work well with it. If that isn't an option then a clearly written, honest ad could give you an idea about response by those who reply.

I have a 30 year old. The vet was astonished about the fact she had all of her teeth and they were in good shape. I had him out because she was losing muscle and weight. She has pssm. Needs more excercise than she gets but he feels that and a good worming could turn her around. Has to be kept on a restrictive diet. Even as sane and sound as she is I would not consider her saleable. And though she would test any new handler she is easy to handle and well behaved in a herd situation.

If you as an experienced horse person thinks there is hope then don't lose it.
 

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When you say he'll hurt himself trying to get to them. Do you mean he's aggressive or he acts like a fool when introduced? Is he living all alone? You may be able to sell him as a pasture mate.
 

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Can you contact some vets in the area and explain the situation? Maybe they know someone who would be interested. It may very likely end up practically giving the horse away, although, I do not suggest the horse being free. Only because if they have to pay at least $500, it's more than they would get at the killer auction and they may feel they have some "skin in the game".

Another option is if you know of some training barns, again, explain the situation and see if the barn owner/ mgr thinks there may be someone that would be a good fit.

If possible, I would suggest going to talk with these people in person- simply because this is going to be a tougher sell to do over the phone and they may be more willing to give this some serious consideration.
 
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