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I know there have been a couple of threads on this recently, but I didn't see one addressing this exact shelter. I'm looking for something temporary, big enough for 2 horses, and I don't think the 12x12 corral shelters will be big enough. This is the one I'm looking at:

Font Automotive tire Line Rectangle Sleeve


We are going to build a nice run in or barn eventually (I can't decide), but I would like to have horses here before that will be completed. This would be used for hay/equipment storage after the permanent shelter is up. My friend just put up the smaller one that is attached to corral panels and the horses won't even go in it. The field Dylan is in has an old carport instead and he will go in there so I'm wondering if this is more likely to be used since it's not completely enclosed. We do not have heavy snow here, usually just one or two storms with a few inches and it melts in a day or two. We sometimes get high winds, but we're in a valley so that helps block some of it. There's also the option of just fencing around a small area of trees for the natural shelter, but the run-in will be complete before summer, and I'm not sure that bare trees will really help in winter.
 

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Sorry, not THIS specific shelter but I've got a lot of experience with a rectangular Shelter Logic structure that we use for our vehicle.

The covers are not durable. We just put new sides up on our 10x20 structure. In the next couple of days we had high winds (40 mph gusts). The grommets were pulling out. For this issue we keep a supply of very high quality "tarp clips" to replace the grommets and they outlive the grommets greatly. The entire structure is anchored with screw in anchors and kept taut with ratchet straps. We have a number of cords running horizontally to minimize billowing. They flap. Whenever there's snow or high wind predicted we move the truck out of it. The covers last 2-3 years and are relatively expensive to replace.

It's hard to say how a horse will react to flapping/billowing, etc. and if it's not securely anchored it'll go sailing in a decent wind.
 

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We had Cover-It shelters for equipment protection, believe that company was bought by this one...
Several things I see is the overall height is 8' but that is on a continuous arc and may not offer enough head clearance the horse not be claustrophobic inside it.
These things do shake and vibrate in winds and make a crashing sound when snow slips off...all things that might put the horse off from utilizing your best laid intentions to failure. They also whistle when winds rush through them.
In summer the heat buildup inside is unbearable and in winter freezing that moisture accumulates on the tarp underside then drips down inside to wet the contents are issues few will tell of but we honestly experienced.
Those tarps very easily pierce and don't get any hot anything near a wall or it melts.{ask how we discovered that }
Here in Florida we see the remains of them from a bad summer thunderstorm is a tangled mess and garbage in a field or out for dumpster collection.
For what one of these cost and knowing how they are not made to withstand weather abuses....this appears as the thing Tractor Supply sells for $400 less the tax its going to need added...and the tubing frame is thin and cheap.
Instead I would invest in some lumber for a frame of 8' wall side height, and a "hard" roof of heavy-duty plastic or metal sheets secured. A few pieces of T-111 siding will give you a substantial shelter for years of service far longer than investing in that tarp covering.
It will cost a few $$ more but will not need a replacement expense sooner rather than near a decade later or more...sometimes spending a bit more now truly is better and money-saving.
As your project and needs expand so can this shelter to be fully enclosed if you wish....with many amenities the protecting of your items would benefit from, not just shelter your horse.

If you must have the tarp feature, then make a suitable frame, pad the sharper edges with pool noodle and pull a large HD tarp you can purchase from a place in large enough size for about $70 - 85 dollars as you save and finish your major project in a few months.
Directions can be easily found for DIY projects online to make lasting projects.

We live in Florida and bought from Lowe's plastic sheeting to use in our pole barn wall where we have our feed and a few bales of hay protected from driving rains and UV protection and bleaching of items happening.
Those "sheets" have now been in place nearly 10 years and lasted through many a hurricane and storms of intense wind and have yet to fail us...so although not snow, winds of 110 mph have been endured.
These are similar to what we bought...and yes they are only about 30" wide, 12' long so require more but bulk discounts and military discounts utilized can save you too.

Sadly, that which you showed I do not see being successful a purchase and what you desire, "Shelter" for your horse except maybe if one stands dead in the center because of head clearance...
You also need long, long augers to screw into the ground and straps to secure shelter to ground or a sailing object you shall see in a winter storm.
🐴....
 

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I'm wondering if we can get just a frame and roof up in a couple of weeks and then finish out the run in after that. $800 will go pretty far on lumber and everything. We saw the one my friend put up again and I don't know if it's worth the money...
If you can live without it, I think you're wise to consider some alternatives - if there are any! "Real" membrane shelters are about as expensive as pole construction. But I think you'll see this shelter blow away in the wind like dollar bills in your environment. When we used to camp on our high desert property, I relied on blankets to be "portable barns" and the horses did just fine in the worst weather and wind. In summer, we erected a 10x20 Shelterlogic rectangular shelter in their corral to protect against the sun, but we drove a T-post at each leg of the frame and strapped the frame to those on one side, and heavy corral panels on the other. We had it tied down every which way from Sunday, and when we packed up to leave, we took the cover off and stowed it.
 
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