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Here goes my first post!
My horse was being very against me tacking her up, normally she wouldnt mind at all but she started not even wanting me holding the saddle next to her.

Of course I called my saddle fitter and she came out to check the saddle, and af course it didn’t fit! Now, this is the saddle that took us 9 months to find! And now if doesn’t even fit! Ahhhhh!!!

My saddle fitter basically told me she is starting to build more muscle and now she has muscle in half her back but not the other, this means there is basically no saddle we could buy, let alone find, that would fit her.

This left us with 2 options, either we ride bareback until we can build on more muscle, or we purchase a treeless saddle.

I’m not a fan of treeless saddles. I think they are a bit of a wacky idea, but I trust my saddle fitter with my life so she recommended I get a barefoot which is anyway the only saddle I would have wanted as that is the one I trust the most.

Now I’m picking my brand new barefoot treeless saddle up in 5 days and I just questioned this, why didn’t we use half pads? I do remember her saying something about why I can’t but I just forgot what she said, so if anyone has been in the same shoes, please let me know!

Long story short: saddle didn’t fit because muscle was distributed unevenly, why can’t I just use a riser pad?
 

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That says you need to put more work into developing the other side and working evenly.
 

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Why not buy some saddle shims for one side ( actually I think you have to buy a set) for now while you work on building muscle on the other side. I would think that would be cost efficient as well as use the saddle you currently have.
 

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All horses are unevenly muscled, exactly the same as us. It's the degree of unevenness that often causes issues.

Small differences can usually be flocked out but greater degrees sometimes need shimming, as ksbowman says. I try to avoid this because the range of adjustment shims provide is less than a properly flocked panel, but sometimes it's the only practical solution. Riser pads don't often allow that level of adjustment.

The other thing I use personally is a Korrector, which has 4 airbags and can be adjusted for front/rear or side-to-side balance. Each airbag can be adjusted individually if necessary. It's a bit of a fiddle to set up initially but a doddle once to get the hang of it.
 

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All horses are unevenly muscled, exactly the same as us. It's the degree of unevenness that often causes issues.

Small differences can usually be flocked out but greater degrees sometimes need shimming, as ksbowman says. I try to avoid this because the range of adjustment shims provide is less than a properly flocked panel, but sometimes it's the only practical solution. Riser pads don't often allow that level of adjustment.

The other thing I use personally is a Korrector, which has 4 airbags and can be adjusted for front/rear or side-to-side balance. Each airbag can be adjusted individually if necessary. It's a bit of a fiddle to set up initially but a doddle once to get the hang of it.
I've never heard of the Korrector I'm more old school and didn't even know it existed . That sounds like a good idea though. My 3.5 yo filly just had to be upgraded from a standard to a wide saddle because of her growth. She started objecting to trotting by pinning ears when I was in the saddle. Without my extra weight she was fine with only a saddle. She also would trot in the pasture as long as it was her idea without objection. With the wide tree she is a happy camper again. Good luck I hope you get your problem worked out soon.
 
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