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I just wanted to know what is the normal heart rate for a horse while it is standing, walking and trotting. My daughter is doing a science project on horses and I need that information. Unfortunately it's been doing a lot of raining here, so right now the ground is slick. If it wasn't for that I'd just check my own horse. I'm researching it on the net now, but so far I haven't been able to come up with anything helpful. Thanks!
 

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On this website it says that a horse's heart rate, while standing, can be as low as 25bpm. As soon as the saddle goes on it can immediately go to 60-70bpm because the horse's brain is sending him warning impulses to get ready for excersize. They also say that when running or cantering vigorously, it can go from 120-170bpm. Ill give you the website below...

http://img2.custompublish.com/getfi...Heart+(Part+II).pdf?return=www.equus-sport.no
 

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I have been helping with the vet arival inspections at a massive Horse trials over here over the last few days and it seems to be averaging around mid 30 to mid 40 but ranging from mid 20 to 60. But keep in mind these are all horses not long off the truck aswell =D
 

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Thanks :D I did find one website (although I don't know how credible it is) that said at a rest it should be 38-42 at rest, 60-80 at walk and 120-140 at trot. That seems kind of high though, doesn't it?
 

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I ran a heart rate monitor for years in endurance. In endurance there is a "gate" a spot you can no go past until your horse meets the rides peramiter. It was usually 64. If your horse's heart rate was above 64 you could not proceed.
Resting my guys are all around 32-36. After 12 miles of continued trotting I would get off about 100 yards from one of these gates, loosen the saddle and walk him to the gate and call for a check and he would be below 64.

On trail I ran him about 135, this is a nice working trot, I would not let him sustain 150 or higher since it produced lactic acid and fatique.

Yes on some unhill climbs it did spike around 160 but quickly dropped to the 110 just over the hill and starting back down.

If a horse is kept at say 135 he can go on forever. If it climbs to over 150 he is fatigueing and going down hill.

Hope this gives you more information then you need
 

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Yes ^^ riosdad! That makes a lot of sense. I've heard about the lactic acid situation as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all very much for your help!
 
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