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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay. I need to get hoof boots and I need to measure to the heel buttress. Can someone kindly mark it on these stupid pictures? I am so frustrated and this is about 4 hours after a fresh trim. I have tried to measure and others have given me many different answers. We ride barefoot 85% of the time but we have found some beautiful but rocky trails we want to ride so going to buy some Cavallos to keep in the trailer.
 

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If you call Cavallo, they will tell you precisely how to measure, as will any of the other boot companies:)

There are also different styles of boots to fit different shapes of hooves and heel bulb thickness:)
 
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The heels are not properly trimmed. The heel buttresses are way too far forward which contributes to a thin sole. The heel buttresses cannot be safely corrected in one trim. At each trim, a different measurement/size boot would be needed.



The best bet if the horse is to have boots right away would be to purchase boots based on where the heel buttress should be trimmed to and getting by with this until the horse is properly trimmed at which time the boots will fit properly.


Below is a link that describes clearly where various parts of the solar surface of the hoof should be including the heel buttress. Below the link is a picture identifying the location of the heel buttress. It's only bee a few years since I was struggling with the same questions.


https://s3.amazonaws.com/amo_hub_co.../ELPO-EvaluationProtocol-2017-11x17-Print.pdf


Buttress.jpg


Edit:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The heels are not properly trimmed. The heel buttresses are way too far forward which contributes to a thin sole. The heel buttresses cannot be safely corrected in one trim. At each trim, a different measurement/size boot would be needed.



The best bet if the horse is to have boots right away would be to purchase boots based on where the heel buttress should be trimmed to and getting by with this until the horse is properly trimmed at which time the boots will fit properly.


Below is a link that describes clearly where various parts of the solar surface of the hoof should be including the heel buttress. Below the link is a picture identifying the location of the heel buttress. It's only bee a few years since I was struggling with the same questions.


https://s3.amazonaws.com/amo_hub_co.../ELPO-EvaluationProtocol-2017-11x17-Print.pdf


View attachment 1014513


Edit:
One of the horses is a new horse and has only gone through 2 trims. My farrier indicated her heels were contracted from poor shoeing (he took her shoes off when she arrived as her feet were crumbly and horrible). The problem is that it is EXTREMELY dry and rocky here, and their feet are ROCK hard right now. I am feeding a hoof supplement. The pictures are of two different horses - the top 2 are a gray pony and the bottom 2 are the champagne TWH that I just acquired. We are still putting weight on her and managing some other issues. Actually, the pony on the top can do the rocky trails pretty well - she's lived here a long time and her feet are like iron, but I still think I should put protection on her fronts. I guess I just can't really "see" where the buttress line is so I am having a hard time measuring.
 

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Heel buttress just means the ground surface of the heel wall, or the heel corner. Heel buttresses for boot fit easy with these feet - can get tricky when heels are 'run forward' tho. Have drawn where you measure to. But where you measure *from* is a bit iffy, as hoof obviously 'run forward' in the toe & looks like I'd bring it back to at least where my blue line is - tho with one little pic like that, can't say accurately whether/how much more it may be OK to bring it.
 

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The heels are not properly trimmed. The heel buttresses are way too far forward which contributes to a thin sole. The heel buttresses cannot be safely corrected in one trim. At each trim, a different measurement/size boot would be needed.
Last reply was after seeing no one had marked a pic as you asked, but now read replies.

Granted, the pics are little & too pixellated when enlarged to be 100% but this doesn't seem to be the case at all. Heel buttresses, while they do look like they are high, do not appear to be much if any run forward, let alone 'way too far'. They should be back at the 'dimple' of the central sulcus, or the widest part of the frog(well, what should be widest if not so contracted). Seems like that's where they are.

But toes are way forward - possibly you meant to say that not heels Hondo. On what seems the worse, I marked the heel platforms/widest part of frog/mid-'dimple', then the termination of bar & widest part of sole, which gives you the centre of articulation of the foot, which enables you to work out 'breakover', being same length or less as the length from heel to mid point. So blue line across toe is approx 'breakover' and toe should end approx at least half inch back on that foot than it does.

Again, pics too small & pixellated, also as you've no doubt seen me say ad nauseum, that just a few pics, let alone having only that one angle, doesn't allow for real accuracy, so take info as 'food for thought' not hard & fast where to trim or such. And if you want more feedback on trimming/rehab, feel free to post more pics - assume you've also seen what pic angles are needed, as per the link in my signature.
 

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The high point of the heel to my eyes on the top is lined up with the red line. Where it should be is lined up with the blue line. The lower heel almost looks as if it may be trimmed to the blue line. If so there is a big imbalance. But hopefully, the imbalance is in the shading of the picture and my eyes.


So that's what a solar shot at an angle is for. That delineates the plane of the solar surface and heels.


ButtressPic copy.jpg
 

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Agreed on the toe. The picture I posted reads about 1 3/4" from the outer hoof wall to the frog apex. According to a few thousand x-rays examined by Gene and crew, the distance to breakover should be 1-1 1/4" from the 'true' apex of the frog. If the 'true' apex is further back, then it'd be more. But based on the widest part of the foot measurement agreeing, I'd go with the 1/2".


If the heels are trimmed to the buttresses, it may have been recently as the toe should self correct in time if the heels are correct.


At any rate, I still suggest measureing where the foot would be if balanced and buying boots for that. Otherwise, new boots will be needed before they are worn out.


I'm curious to see what an angle solar shot looks like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The heels are not properly trimmed. The heel buttresses are way too far forward which contributes to a thin sole. The heel buttresses cannot be safely corrected in one trim. At each trim, a different measurement/size boot would be needed.
Last reply was after seeing no one had marked a pic as you asked, but now read replies.

Granted, the pics are little & too pixellated when enlarged to be 100% but this doesn't seem to be the case at all. Heel buttresses, while they do look like they are high, do not appear to be much if any run forward, let alone 'way too far'. They should be back at the 'dimple' of the central sulcus, or the widest part of the frog(well, what should be widest if not so contracted). Seems like that's where they are.

But toes are way forward - possibly you meant to say that not heels Hondo. On what seems the worse, I marked the heel platforms/widest part of frog/mid-'dimple', then the termination of bar & widest part of sole, which gives you the centre of articulation of the foot, which enables you to work out 'breakover', being same length or less as the length from heel to mid point. So blue line across toe is approx 'breakover' and toe should end approx at least half inch back on that foot than it does.

Again, pics too small & pixellated, also as you've no doubt seen me say ad nauseum, that just a few pics, let alone having only that one angle, doesn't allow for real accuracy, so take info as 'food for thought' not hard & fast where to trim or such. And if you want more feedback on trimming/rehab, feel free to post more pics - assume you've also seen what pic angles are needed, as per the link in my signature.
This is the TWH foot and yes her feet have long toes and we have been trimming them back. My farrier can only get to me every 7-8 weeks, so this pic is after trim #2. She has much more tender feet so I wanted boots to help her on our trail rides. She also has some conformity issues and toes out on the fronts, but she seems to do OK. I have a side view of her foot.
 

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The high point of the heel to my eyes on the top is lined up with the red line.
As said, being little so lacking detail it is a bit hard to see clearly, but I think your red line is the inner heel corner/bar which has been rasped flat on the ground surface, bit much maybe of bar left, and def too much heel - but on that note, and as you also mentioned, if they were substantially higher than that, farrier needs to take heels down gradually.
 

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If the heels are trimmed to the buttresses, it may have been recently as the toe should self correct in time if the heels are correct.
Not in my experience. Of course, depends on environment & amount of exercise on it - long toes can break away/'self trim' regardless of heel height, but if they're not in a situation where they 'self trim', they will just get longer.
 

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It is common that long toe and under-run heel exist in unison, which in turn contribute to or cause thin soles and ouchyness on gravel.


The measurement charts on all boots, and the manufacturers say this themselves, is based on a balanced and properly trimmed hoof.


At six months into horse ownership when buying the first set of boots, I had no idea of what a balanced hoof was or how to obtain it. It can be a steep, confusing, and contradictory learning curve.
 
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