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I came across Horse forum and just can't tell you how much all of you have helped me already! I had horses when I was 20 (I'm 58 now). Things were different then. 80 dollars for full board compared to the 550 I'm paying now. Anyway, I do have alot of experience training and working with horses but this 7 month old gelding of mine has me stumped. Every day I halter him, brush him,pick up his feet,ground tie him which he is perfect at already. The problem is when I walk him from his stall to the big arena to turn him out for some exercise he gets halfway there with alot of coaxing and then plants his feet and won't budge. I'm patient with him. Tell him nothing to be afraid of but no go. So finally we turn around and he almost runs over me to get back to the barn. There is nothing scary on the way to the barn. What do I do? I feel like I'm doing wrong giving in to him.
 

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Well, I'm not sure about what to do with your little horse, but I will say welcome to the forum!

Your little guy is very cute!
 

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Hi and welcome! I agree he's cute. Are those apartments in the back? Like, you could live in the apartments and board your horse right there?

Anyways, to your question, different people have different answers. Here are some random suggestions about the leading aspect. This is a lot, so I won't address the running you over. He needs to respect your personal space. That's just a whole other subject.
  1. Let him go back to the barn, but make him work there. Get a long lead rope and lunge him near the barn, then ask him to go back to the arena. Maybe if he associates the barn with work he won't be so eager to go back.
  2. Feed him in the arena, if that's allowed and safe (no other horses in there).
  3. To create pressure from the rear, carry a dressage whip and wave it behind his butt. Actually I'd start by waving your hand sort of near his butt and progress from there if needed.
  4. To force the horse to take a step, turn his head and walk yourself out to that side. If his head is turned far enough, eventually he will have to take a step in order to not lose his balance. Once he is "unstuck" like this it's easier to keep him going.
  5. In general, work on leading him. Forget about the arena for now. Just lead him around the barn, near obstacles, near scary things (when leading past a known scary thing, place your body between him and the scary thing: this reassures him and also means that if he does spook he will spook away from you), places he's hesitant to go, etc. Also work on stopping.
  6. If he won't go to the arena now, fine. Lead him halfway there and then turn back, while it's still your idea and not his. Then next time, take a few steps closer, etc.
  7. Figure out why he doesn't want to go to the arena. If he's kept in a stall all the time, it seems odd that he wouldn't literally jump at the chance to go run around.
  8. When leading him, keep your eyes up and on your goal (maybe make it the far rail of the arena) and just keep marching forward. Don't let yourself think that he's going to stop, just tell yourself you're going back there, and go.
 
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Hello and welcome!

It sounds to me as if the young lad doesn鈥檛 have anything wrong with him, except that he wants to be boss.

I have had all sorts of horse personalities, of my own, throughout my lifetime. I still have the oneriest one to ever set a hoof in my pasture. He was 2-1/2 when I bought him and he is a long 26 now, lollol. He is on the right in my avatar- just look at that innocent face:rolleyes:

He is not a mean fella but he is a bully and a con artist, who does his best to get out of work. At 26+ he is not as bad as he was as a 2+ year old but he never stops trying to one up me:)

To your 7 month old. What you are asking is far from unreasonable and not at all I. The realm of 鈥渉e might be in pain鈥, which I am notorious for starting out with.

He is a little brat who probably was not well disciplined by his dam, therefore he has acquired a big sense of entitlement.

You have past experience, so this is where you put the No-Fear T-Shirt back on, buy yourself a buggy whip (NOT a riding crop for this) and halter him with at least ten feet of lead rope.

Wear gloves that will not only protect your hands but give you some extra grip on the lead rope - make sure you do not get the rope wrPped around your hand.

With a firm grip on the halter And the lead rope, take the buggy whip in your left hand, swing behind you (you are still walking forward with the colt) and lace that back leg as hard as you can, while simul hollering 鈥淲ALK!鈥 and urging forward with your hand that鈥檚 on the halter.

This does two things:

1. Stops him from going in a circle, if you are facing his side or the leg to be disciplined.

2. He doesn鈥檛 know it鈥檚 you doing the hitting, lollol. All he knows is that some THING came out of nowhere while you are tell ing him to walk and mayhaps he had better move before it eats his leg clear off:)

Swinging the buggy whip around to whap the back leg, as described, you cannot possibly hurt him enough to do any any damage.

It takes some coordination and quick footwork on your part but it should not take more than a couple of times for him to get the message.

Although be forewarned, this antic of his might be the beginning of many 鈥渘o, I don鈥檛 wanna鈥檚鈥, lollol.. My horse is one of the toughest trail horses I have ever had and while He is not a mean horse, he could have bee, had I not hung onto him and he fell into hands that had zero patience or training knowledge to handle him:)

I hope this helps. Hope to hear from you often:)
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi and welcome! I agree he's cute. Are those apartments in the back? Like, you could live in the apartments and board your horse right there?

Anyways, to your question, different people have different answers. Here are some random suggestions about the leading aspect. This is a lot, so I won't address the running you over. He needs to respect your personal space. That's just a whole other subject.
  1. Let him go back to the barn, but make him work there. Get a long lead rope and lunge him near the barn, then ask him to go back to the arena. Maybe if he associates the barn with work he won't be so eager to go back.
  2. Feed him in the arena, if that's allowed and safe (no other horses in there).
  3. To create pressure from the rear, carry a dressage whip and wave it behind his butt. Actually I'd start by waving your hand sort of near his butt and progress from there if needed.
  4. To force the horse to take a step, turn his head and walk yourself out to that side. If his head is turned far enough, eventually he will have to take a step in order to not lose his balance. Once he is "unstuck" like this it's easier to keep him going.
  5. In general, work on leading him. Forget about the arena for now. Just lead him around the barn, near obstacles, near scary things (when leading past a known scary thing, place your body between him and the scary thing: this reassures him and also means that if he does spook he will spook away from you), places he's hesitant to go, etc. Also work on stopping.
  6. If he won't go to the arena now, fine. Lead him halfway there and then turn back, while it's still your idea and not his. Then next time, take a few steps closer, etc.
  7. Figure out why he doesn't want to go to the arena. If he's kept in a stall all the time, it seems odd that he wouldn't literally jump at the chance to go run around.
  8. When leading him, keep your eyes up and on your goal (maybe make it the far rail of the arena) and just keep marching forward. Don't let yourself think that he's going to stop, just tell yourself you're going back there, and go.
Yes,I actually live in those apartments across the street and just walk over. I moved there because of that reason馃槉thankyou so much for your response!! I'm going to the barn right now and try out what you've said. Ill let you know how it goes馃榾thanks!!
 

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It is no doubt NOT that there is something bad in the arena, but rather that he is not happy to leave the good things back in the barn, be it buddies, food, or shelter. If you have another horse, could you start out with bringing along a buddy, and work on leading him away from the buddy , then back, then away, then partt way bak, then away, etcc. So he gets more comfortabel being takenn away from his buddies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It is no doubt NOT that there is something bad in the arena, but rather that he is not happy to leave the good things back in the barn, be it buddies, food, or shelter. If you have another horse, could you start out with bringing along a buddy, and work on leading him away from the buddy , then back, then away, then partt way bak, then away, etcc. So he gets more comfortabel being takenn away from his buddies.
I think your right about not wanting to leave the barn.He looks forward to eating when he sees me.
 

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I dknt have much advice sorry but welcome! If you can get him in the arena, maybe at night time or when there are no other horses there, lock him in with some feed and let him get comfortable. Jake hated one of my paddocks so I licked him in there and gave him a bucket of treats and the next day I had no problem getting him there. Also as suggested before try do it with another horse too, or get someone to lead another horse infront of you, I鈥檓 sure someone will be willing to help
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I dknt have much advice sorry but welcome! If you can get him in the arena, maybe at night time or when there are no other horses there, lock him in with some feed and let him get comfortable. Jake hated one of my paddocks so I licked him in there and gave him a bucket of treats and the next day I had no problem getting him there. Also as suggested before try do it with another horse too, or get someone to lead another horse infront of you, I鈥檓 sure someone will be willing to help
Thank you!
 

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Yes,I actually live in those apartments across the street and just walk over. I moved there because of that reason馃槉thankyou so much for your response!! I'm going to the barn right now and try out what you've said. Ill let you know how it goes馃榾thanks!!
How did it go.
 
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