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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I show western and I have recently been doing a lot of spinning and hard stops with my horse, Max, and I was wondering about getting boots/leg protection for him. He had small burns/rubs on his hind fetlocks from stopping hard so I know I need to get that protected so I was thinking about skid boots(picture 1 is the normal ones but picture 2 is the skid boots that are also SMBs) but then I thought those wouldn't protect his hind legs as well. So then I thought that sport medicine boots(picture 3) would be a good idea because a lot of my friends wear those and they provide a lot of protection but I don't know if I should get just the front ones or the front and back(and would the back ones protect his fetlocks very well?) Do any of y'all have ideas about brands of SMBs I was thinking professionals choice or lami-cell v22 but I'm really not sure. Also, bell boots(picture 4)-do I need them and why?

<img src="https://www.valleyvet.com/group_images/44678_B.jpg" alt="Image result for horse skid boots"/>

<img src="https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/9TQAAOSw3ddc4enE/s-l640.jpg" alt="C--ROY PROFESSIONAL CHOICE VENTECH SLIDE TEC HORSE LEG SKID BOOTS PAIR LONG ROYA"/>

<img src="https://i.pinimg.com/736x/93/42/a2/9342a22d2b815b786344b619c490f854--cowgirl-boots-horse-boots.jpg" alt="Image result for horse sport medicine boots"/>

<img src="https://img.smartpak.com/images/product/highres/20180_white_grass-3.jpg" alt="Image result for horse bell boots"/>
 

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Your pictures are not showing, but by highlighting your https address and opening a new tab I saw some specific what you are asking about.

I see many riders who do fast, hard turns and stops using leg protection for their horses...
As your horse is showing signs of rubs, it is appropriate to protect.
Do though also alert your farrier to the fact you are seeing, take pictures and show so they know if something needs tweaking they were unaware of or if the horse is shod maybe a different shoe used is in order.
So, I see Professional Choice boots used often but not all the time...
I think what you use is horse specific for fit and what it is you look to protect and can afford to be honest.

So, bell boots can be used front {commonly} or rear to protect the coronet band from a strike and heel bulbs on fronts from a strike... I have not seen where used on the rear hooves they have stopped abrading issues...they are designed to protect coronet band and lower hoof.
Skid boots protect fetlock rear/back from rubs as they slide the hind feet in deep footing like slide stopping, cutting and such...I'm not seeing side coverage to protect the ankle from rubbing that is going to take out these boots side panel quickly on a horse with fetlock rubbing.
SMB's are supposed to give a support to the fetlock from over extension others don't offer because of the lower "suspensory" strap...
I see no added protection for a fetlock rub or forging though and think it would not take much to go right through that suspensory strap losing what is advertised as a key point of this purchased product.
:shrug:..I rarely "boot-up" my horses so don't know if this boot does offer more protection than others or if it is a good advertising/marketing campaign that makes them seen more often.
Again, I am not seeing a additional piece of protection as you need for one rubbing hinds...

Now ankle/fetlock boots are made to protect hind ankles...
They come in neoprene and leather along with other materials.
They don't offer any other protection but fetlock rubbing protection and as you can see they are made with a additional covering cup to offer that protection..

To apply boots I was taught weakens the horse in conditioning of the entire animal.
If you have a issue address it, yes of course.
To use boots though because your friends do, no.
Boot because the animal has a need and then use that specific boot as needed.
Do not be part of today's fad of applying without a reason/cause, making your horse dependent upon because he is not conditioned the same where a boot sits daily in exercise and now when you can't use it {if at a show} your horse suffers the consequence and injures/pulls something.
Be very cautious what you apply and why.

I would make a call to your farrier first and ask what they suggest as they see how your horse is wearing his hooves or shoes when they do their work...
You may also be asked to ride the horse so the farrier can see what your concern is.

I had a horse when I bought him rubbed terribly behind...alerted my farrier, ASAP he came and watched, saw and then made different to the horse in shoes or trim I don't know, but something.
Threw the fetlock boots in bottom of my tack trunk never used again...issue was no more. :smile:

If you feel you must purchase boots wanting all 4 legs covered, buy as a dedicated set so front and backs in the same style as there are slight differences in what protections they offer.
Many brands are sold as set of 4... https://www.horseloverz.com/horse-equipment/horse-boots/horse-boot-sets
:runninghorse2:...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for your answer:thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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So I show western and I have recently been doing a lot of spinning and hard stops with my horse, Max, and I was wondering about getting boots/leg protection for him. He had small burns/rubs on his hind fetlocks from stopping hard so I know I need to get that protected so I was thinking about skid boots(picture 1 is the normal ones but picture 2 is the skid boots that are also SMBs) but then I thought those wouldn't protect his hind legs as well. So then I thought that sport medicine boots(picture 3) would be a good idea because a lot of my friends wear those and they provide a lot of protection but I don't know if I should get just the front ones or the front and back(and would the back ones protect his fetlocks very well?) Do any of y'all have ideas about brands of SMBs I was thinking professionals choice or lami-cell v22 but I'm really not sure. Also, bell boots(picture 4)-do I need them and why?
Your post is a little confusing. I will try to break them down. Different types of boots offer different protection, some like the skid boots only offer external protection (a barrier between the leg and anything else) SMB boots are not designed for external protection (though they offer some just by being on the horse, or as the second picture posted they can be reinforced) but they offer support to the tendons and leg.

Bell boots offer protection to the hoof itself. I would definitely buy some if your horse has shoes or steps on their front feet with the back. You don't need to buy a fancy pair like that either there are plenty of cheap rubber ones. Just depends on what you feel you need. As said they are typically worn on the fronts (overreach concerns)

If he has rubs on his back legs you absolutely should focus on that. Skid boots are DESIGNED for back legs. If you look at the first picture you shared they are on the horses back legs. Something like that would likely do the trick for you, but it won't offer any further protection then from just the impact of the stop on the outside of his leg (like a bandaid) They will do the trick if you decide that's all you want for you. Really anything that covers his back fetlocks would work, though, if just plain smbs be prepared for the rub to go right through-you'll want that reinforcement.

If you also feel he needs support for his leg when you work him hard then I would go with SMBs. You don't need to wear them all the time, but if you're thinking "we're really going to work today" I would boot him up. You just need to decide what works for you. As was touched on any time you use a tool (boots) to support the leg then the leg needs to work less hard to support itself and is as a result weaker and relies on the boots. Not saying not to get SMB boots but something to keep in mind with any sort of support boot (not the protection only boots), the fitness of his bones and stuff is just if not more important then the fitness of his lungs or muscles.

Based off the little info given support boots all around may be good (I'm assuming he's being ridden pretty hard if he's getting rubs. You've reached the level of riding that is very hard on the horse and protection will only help you). Those splint/smb boots may be good for his back legs. Or you could do SMBs in front and regular splints behind. You just need to decide what your goals are- support or protect? Or both? Remember the fronts carry most of the weight and do most of the work, but you're also getting him to use his hind end and there's obviously a rubbing issue in back too. Personally I like to wrap though it sounds like boots may be a better choice for you. You could even do JUST the boots first pictured and nothing else. Just break it down to decide what you need don't just stare at all the choices, it's overwhelming!

Unless I'm misunderstanding I do not think fetlock boots would be appropriate for you at all. They are good for horses that interfere, but sounds like that's not the problem. I know they were mentioned a bunch above..

As far as brands as said I mostly wrap and am an English rider, I would just ask around. Both are well known brands.
 

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I am a bit old fashioned and prefer the leather buckle style skid boots over the neoprene or even the leather ones with the velcro. If the dirt gets in them it falls out rather than getting trapped in the boot.
https://www.nrsworld.com/nrs/ed-gal...6pLDaDQUtQ2s4T6znumk9TlQr20DVEPIaAkyFEALw_wcB
If you are burning your horse's fetlocks by stopping him and if he gets sore he may start to get hesitant to stop hard for you. So it might be a good idea to invest in some if that's the case.

I rarely use boots or polos for the fronts anymore. Occasionally I may use them if I am working on something(like turnarounds) and the horse is banging his legs causing him to hop around or if he is banging his legs stopping and turning with a cow.

I do use a set of gum rubber bell boots. Even though my horse don't tend to catch their fronts with their hinds, they have caught themselves on the heel bulbs making a turn then a big jump to come out of it to catch a cow.
 

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