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I agree, they're adorable!


How rich is the grass where you are? In our area (Iowa) the pasture grass is far too rich for donkeys, miniature horses, and even some mules. Donkeys are genetically designed to subsist on very sparse, dry vegetation and lush pasture is exactly the opposite. I have a few friends with donkeys and they keep them on dry lot nearly all the time. One lets hers go out on pasture that has been grazed down to nothing by sheep, but only one of hers even gets that privilege. It may be that any grass at all is just too rich for your little guy?
 

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Eeek!! I'm actually quite shocked at the pics, and that it sounds like you haven't yet consulted a vet or farrier about this. You need a good one of each of these professionals, *urgently*! (as you can't get one long ago before this prob was so chronic/acute, so...). You need to find people who are lameness/orthopedic specialists. Your donkey needs way more than what is in the scope of forum replies!

I cannot give anything specific just from these 2 pics, except to say he's in a rather desperate way. You say this red shows 'with even light rasping' so does that mean you have rasped into the sole at the ground surface?? You should DEFINITELY NOT do that! He probably had thin soles anyway.

Saw Walkin's reply & agree. I think he is seriously foundered. But the imbalance & extreme length of the foot shows that he has been suffering from mechanical issues for a LOONG time. So while it may be systemic laminitis as well(& regular grass hay & pasture is often too rich/sugary for horses, let alone donks), it is definitely at least exacerbated by incorrect trimming, and possibly some limb deformity that's influenced the balance - beyond the scope here to do more than guess, but at 10mo if it is that case, it's now beyond the scope of a vet or farrier to 'correct' with orthopedics.

I marked your pics to show... on the sole pic that the heels are quite imbalanced, and all in front of that red line at the toe is acutely stressed/damaged external laminae. And the pic of hoof on ground, while it's taken on an angle, so this makes the view inaccurate, my red lines mark the 'broken back' hoof/pastern angle, the long, lumpy looking toe and the long, crushed forward heel. Also marked that while there may be some stretching, the other hind looks, from this angle, to be reasonable, as to the hoof/pastern angle.
 

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I'm surprised @loosie hasn't found this thread yet, she may have some good thoughts.
Just did ;-) - she had it in health. I found it & moved it to hoofcare. No *good* thoughts though unfortunately.
 

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He is occasionally ally on pasture but 90-95% of the time he is in a dry lot. I am pulling him off completely.
One misconception people often have is that hay is OK when fresh grass isn't. Quite often, the difference is lack of moisture & nutrients. Sometimes it may even be richer in sugars than the grass the horse/donk is being kept off. Grass only loses/uses sugars in active growth, not once dead/dried. So I'd ensure that unless you have grass hay that's been tested/confirmed very low sugar, that you soak & drain it before feeding, to leach out some of the sugars. Also feed in a small holed net or such, so the donks can't pig out.

And supps. Look into well balanced nutriution, as that's a big factor in hoof, as well as rest-of-body health, and will be deficient/imbalanced if they're only getting hay. Esp look into adding magnesium. www.ecirhorse.com is a good resource to learn more about diet & nutrition as it relates to hooves especially.
 
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