The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
I think that it is only fair to let him have a little time to adjust, as long as he isn't seriously hurting himself. I agree that you need to monitor his quality of life, but as long as he is doing well, is happy, isn't losing weight because of stress ect., there is no reason he can't live for a few more years at least, as a happy healthy horse. We had a 35+ year old horse (vet actually said that he was probably older than that, but based on his teeth, he was at least 35), who was still jumping small jumps, barrel racing, going on trail rides, ect., and loving life, never had an unsound day except when he has absesses, but he finally colicked one night. We gave him the night to see if he would get any better, even though he was old, but we did have to put him down the next day. We don't regret at all spending the extra bunch of money to keep him as comfortable as possible during the night to see if he would get better, even though it would have saved money if we had just put him down when he first colicked. Sounds like he's doing better though, and hopefully he'll work everything out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,672 Posts
I just have one thing to say. You guys obviously haven't been reserching horse blindness, I, on the other hand, have. My second horse was a 16.2hh half blind Appaloosa gelding. He was a great horse and I really wanted him but my parents weren't sure if his blindness would be a problem. So I looked up horse blindness and it ends up, When horses go blind the extra space in their brains normally used to remember things that they have seen turns into a space for them to map out every place that they have been recently. The process of them going blind can be stressful for them but they get used to it. Once they get used to it you just have to make sure to walk them around the perimeter of the place they will be set free. If you are riding or walking on the lead it is not nessecery.
Your welcome!
Megan



PS: never and I repeat NEVER SHAVE A BLIND HORSE'S WHISKERS!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
we had a horse like that at your barn his owner kept him in his stall nd everyday she would get him used to walking out of his stall and walk him around the arena and eventually she turned him out in the arena and he did great and then she stared lunging him and puting tack on him and the have some one lung him with her on his back and still till this day she rides him in shows and jumping classes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
thanks for everyones input he is doing better every day
I just found this thread and wanted to add my experience to the mix. My 30 yr old appy, Cheno began losing sight over 10 yrs ago. He had gotten to the point he didn't see much more than shadows when he lost one eye to a rupture. That was his good eye. Up until around a year ago he was out on a rough pasture he has been familiar with for many years. Now, due to his age and loss of his teeth, he is in a stall with a paddock most of the time. He is much happier when his chosen friend is nearby, but she isn't. ;) I sometimes wonder if I should let go, but I do not feel it is his time yet. I believe I will know. I feed him a special mix of Beet pulp, alfalfa pellets, total equine and msm for inflamation. He also gets a few flakes of hay that I cut up with big shears daily as he has a lil trouble with long hay. He has been with me since he was 12 and he's not going anywhere until he tells me he's ready. He still enjoys an occasional ride.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
314 Posts
Here's my 28 year old blind Appy mare. Very similar situation, few teeth, lots of senior feed and grazing, very sweet animal. As long as she's content and healthy she has a home with me.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
thanks again, its so nice to hear your stories, will update you on how he is doing. had a bit of a rough day today but appetite is better, so hoping we are still on a positive trend :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
314 Posts
Lovemyponies, how is your blind horse doing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Gosh didn't realise so many appys had such problems, i too have an appy, he recently came to us, completely blind in one eye, very limited sight in the other, he's adjusting very well, had a couple of frantic days, not knowing where he was, but he's doing great now. I've turned him out into a big empty paddock, no tree's etc to get in his way, it's securely hedged all round so no fencing to get tangled in, i've put one mare out with him who is very tollerent of others and they've bonded well, she doesn't mind when he walks across the field and crashes straight into her, he followed her everywhere for the first few days and panicked and called if he lost sight of her but now he has more confidence and knows where he is and where his boundaries/water etc are he's quite happy to leave her side and they'll often be grazing at opposite ends of the field. I always stand with him while he has his feed so he doesn't have the worry of the other horse coming at him and pinching his food.....he hacks out lovely too, follows his friend quite happily, so long as there's always a routine, everything stays in the same place, water etc and they have one gentle forgiving friend i think most horses can cope well, like people it must be quite frightening at first but we all adjust in the end!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
Our appy is doing great!!! He is so amazing, completely adjusted, appetite normal, no more tenseness. Feels his way around carefully, knows where water trough is, smells his friends. He hears and senses everything. Its almost like he can see.
SO happy!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
314 Posts
Hurray hurray!! What great news--so happy to hear it.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top