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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My 25 yr old paint gelding has loose stool (just a big, loose mound) and every time he passes gas, bright orange liquid runs down his legs. I know, really gross, but I need some help. He's had this for quite a while now, and I just can't seem to cure it! He doesn't seem to be losing weight.
He was on bluebonnet senior, so I tried taking him off that and just letting him have pasture. (He's on a 10 acre pasture with two other horses with really good grass) It didn't help, so I tried giving him some probios (vet recommended that) and that still didn't work. Finally I started feeding them again, I put him on a diet of plain old oats, Opti-zyme, and a tbsp. of apple cider vinegar twice a day. It seemed to help a little bit, but it's not gone. He still waters down his legs really bad. I've tried worming him, everything! Nothing works! Does anyone have any advice on how to stop this?
 

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Try a Probiotic paste. It will put the good bacteria back into his gut.
Here's one,
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok. I just feel like since I already tried two different probiotic supplements it won't help. Is the paste stronger than the Opti-zyme and probios and all that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok. I just feel like since I already tried giving him Opti-zyme and probios it wouldn't work. Is the paste stronger than the other suppliments?
 

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you could try some bran . Rice bran . Instead of oats a senior feed. Get a tube of bio sponge and give him some. He could have eaten a weed or something causing the reaction. I would try some Hay pellets or some hay . Does he have free access to salt ? Tyr some electolytes in the feed. A small amount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, he has free access to salt anytime. He sits there and licks it every morning, proving he's losing alot of minerals.
And I was giving him senior feed, and it all started when I moved him here (after I bought him) and started him on bluebonnet senior elite. His diet before was 1/2 oats 1/2 alfalfa pellets, and I just felt like that wasn't enough nutrition for a 25 yr old horse.
 

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I don't know where you are or if redworm (strongyles are a problem) but this was a huge issue for a lot of our horses. Horses got a blood test and it was VERY high for encysted worms so come spring my god did they have chronic diarrhoea. Everything added up. I also have heard of fecal water syndrome but not experienced this myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hmmmm. I've never heard of that. I live in oklahoma I got him earlier this year, way march. And that's around when it started. I just tried worming him again today. Hopefully it will stop. Thanks for all the advice.
 

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i would get him back on the alfalfa pellet. Take him off that other feed. Get him some Nutrena senior feed. I would also put some electrolytes into his feed, he is not getting enough with just the salt lick. I would also use the rice bran . He could have the strongyles , you need to use fenbendazole to kill those. About 3 tubes . Tube one day, wait a day tube again. tehn one more time. Sometimes you need the five day dosage to kill them. I had a mare that caem back from a trainer with them, after dosing her 3 days, wait and then 3 days wait 3 more days, she pooped out this HUGE worm. Huge.
 

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I’ve seen feed create this issue. Wheat hay in particular seemed to do it to a majority of our horses. I would try changing his feed.

To be fair, the horses actually did really well on the wheat hay, and the calves gained weight like crazy with it. The horses also really liked the hay. It seemed more of a visual issue than actually health damaging.

I was happy when we put them back on alfalfa though, just because of the visual.

Of course, I would look into the worms and all of that, but maybe put him back on the feed he was on before this started.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Oh my goodness, I just wormed him again with a really good brand and I think it worked! But thank you everyone for all the helpful advice! 😊 The worms are pretty bad here in OK...
 

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i would get him back on the alfalfa pellet. Take him off that other feed. Get him some Nutrena senior feed. I would also put some electrolytes into his feed, he is not getting enough with just the salt lick. I would also use the rice bran . He could have the strongyles , you need to use fenbendazole to kill those. About 3 tubes . Tube one day, wait a day tube again. tehn one more time. Sometimes you need the five day dosage to kill them. I had a mare that caem back from a trainer with them, after dosing her 3 days, wait and then 3 days wait 3 more days, she pooped out this HUGE worm. Huge.
Omg.
 

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I just thought of something, could he be sanded? When my horses get a bit sanded they get the runs. Try some psyllium also .
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
No, we don't have sand in the pasture, so it's literally impossible. He's alot better since I wormed him, only occasionally watering down his legs, and I'm cleaning it twice a day. I'm going to worm him in a couple of days one more time and that should do it. I'll let y'all know if it doesn't stop the problem. Thanks so much!
 

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Oh my goodness, I just wormed him again with a really good brand and I think it worked! But thank you everyone for all the helpful advice! 😊 The worms are pretty bad here in OK...
Its not about brand its about the drugs used as different ones kill different parasites. To help me overcome the overwhelming brands available I underlined the drugs used to target said worms so I know for future. I've spent a couple hours now on the phone with vets and veterinary pharmacists talking worms. Encysted red worm is when the literally dig into the intestinal wall and then in spring explode out. The damage is near irreversible and if you read the info you'll see there are only two types that can treat worms that have dug into the walls to "hibernate". By damage it can affect their ability to take on nutrients so even if they no longer have the worms they will be suffering the effects still. Repeated seasons, well. Y'know. Double dosing any drug "just because more" isn't advised. The larvae of redworm from a poo can travel 2-3 meters so poo picking is really important. Wet temperate weather means they'll survive longer, too.

Oh and I recently learned that the only way to test for worms that are encysted ("hibernating" in the intestinal walls, waiting to burst out like monsters from alien) is via a blood test. Poo counts are fine the rest of the time. I also learned that tapeworm needs a saliva test as well.

My apologies if you've spoken to a vet and they advised you to worm as such. I hope you dont mind me saying the above I just am worried coz we lost a lot of horses to colic last year due to worm related issues.

As you can see I'm also very scared about it all :<

Not advertising any brand this is just to highlight the drugs mentioned to treat what:

Font Parallel Screenshot Rectangle Number
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thank you so much for all your advice, I really do appreciate anything you guys can tell me, as I'm still learning about alot of things. 😊 I didn't even know there was worms that did that- awful! That list helps so much- thank you. It's REALLY dry here this time of year, 100° heat everyday. He has a run in barn that they spend the hot time of day in, and I make sure to clean it alot so nothing can accumulate.
Also, what I meant by the brand is that I used a different brand (that I have never used before) and I guess that one just had different drugs and was more effective than the last one.
Anyway, I think I've fixed it and both of us are really happy!
Horse Sky Working animal Mane Terrestrial animal

Like I said, I'll keep you guys updated on what happens in the next few days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
And I'm very sorry about your horses. This guy were talking about actually colicked not too long ago (on easter mind you! He had to pick the WORST time ever) and it was a very scary experience.
 

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I have posted this in other places, but I am going to post it again. My sweet neighbor lost her horse to too much salt. Chronic diarrhea. She spent $6,000 on vet bills, bought several kinds of hay, changed feed, antibiotics, probiotics, so many things. Finally the horse died. She got another horse, and after a couple of months, the same thing began happening. What was odd was that the yearling colt she also had did not have any problems with diarrhea.

When she analyzed what was different between the two horses, she realized that one was consuming tons of salt, constantly licking the salt block whereas the other one barely licked it. She switched to limited loose salt and her new horse is now just fine. That was a year and a half ago.

I read on your post that your horse licks a lot of salt. You might try limiting how much salt he gets. It would have saved my neighbor's horse's life if she had known.

This is from a vet website:
Salt Toxicosis: It Happens, but Rarely
Why do horses eat salt? Salt, especially mineral salt, provides many benefits to horses. In fact, it's the most crucial mineral horses require. While horses usually only consume as much as their body needs, occasionally a horse may eat too much salt.

Salt toxicity in horses includes symptoms of colic, diarrhea, drinking too much water, frequent urination, and general weakness. A horse displaying these signs should be seen by a vet immediately.

Salt is water-soluble, so generally a horse will naturally balance salt intake by drinking water to flush out any excess. You should always ensure your horse has access to fresh, clean water when using a mineral block or loose salt mix.

Other Downsides to Too Much Salt
Besides salt toxicity, there are a few less serious and more common side effects of letting your horse binge on salt.

  1. Your horse’s stall will be messy. When a horse eats too much salt, it leads to increased water consumption, which results in an increase in urination. That means a messier stall.
  2. You'll spend more money than necessary. Just because your horse has a huge appetite for salt doesn’t mean they need all of that savory goodness. Most of that over-consumed salt, along with your investment on mineral licks or blocks, will pass through the horse and end up in the bedding or on the ground.
  3. Your horse's mouth will become sore. A horse that spends too much of its day licking a salt block could end up with a sore mouth. That's not what you need when inserting a bridle bit or what you want for your horse's wellbeing.
 
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