The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so, long story short I baught an ottb mare this fall and had her hauled up to me (in fairbanks alaska). She has some leg issues ( a bowed tendon) but she is sound. I have to apply stable bandages every day, she is in them for 24 hrs a day and I come out and change them every night. ( I have been doing this all winter) Today, I noticed a swelling in the lower part of her cannon bone on the back, I am thinking that it is the superficial digital flexor tendon. She is deffinatly off on it and it is tender to the touch. I re-wraped it tonight and cannot hose it or use water or anything like that, the low for tonight is -30 degrees F. Any tips would be great on how to treat it, or what it may be. I have called the vet and left a message. I am hoping it is just a strain....​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,138 Posts
Bowed tendons can take a long time to fully heal, even after they appear sound. I definitely wouldn't fool around with this.

If she were mine, I'd poultice the leg and wrap it, and give 2 gms of bute twice a day until the vet comes out. I'd keep her confined in a stall or very small pen, no grain, lots of bermuda or grass type hay to keep her from getting bored. I'd mix beet pulp or hay pellets with rice bran oil or milled flax, yucca, and MSM, to reduce inflamation and promote healing. (or a joint supplement that has high levels of both yucca and msm)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
I would not go with quite as much Bute as Luvs2Ride would give. 2gms twice a day is a high dose and the risk of gastric upset associated with Bute increases with the increase in dose. A better option is to give 1 gram twice a day or 2 grams once a day. There was a study done on the value of increasing the dose past that 1 gram twice a day/2 grams a day dose and it found that increasing the dose didn't increase the pain relief just the risk associated with the drug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thank your for the replies, I do have a question though, what is polutice? would that be like dmso?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,138 Posts
Thanks Ryle, I didn't know that.

Poultice is a clay-type product that you slather on to reduce swelling. You put some plastic wrap or wax paper over it, then use pillows and standings to wrap it tight. Wrap the other leg without the poultice.

This is the one I always use. It works pretty well. You need to rinse it off, or wipe it off best you can, and re-apply, once a day.
Icetight Poultice from SmartPak Equine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I second the poultice. I think we usually use Uptite Poultice, but whatever you can get should work.
Apply it evenly over the leg, and then we use a strip of paper bag and wet it and then wrap that over the clay and then wrap it like you normally would.

I personally, would then do the 1gm bute 2x a day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,138 Posts
There's always feed bags around. That's what I would use if I didn't come to the barn prepared, lol. The inside layer of most feed bags is like wax-paper. Just tear a good chunk off, or cut it if you can find some scissors ;-).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,176 Posts
Please be careful with the bute. Horse people seem to use that stuff like they're TicTacs. Bute is VERY hard on a horse's stomach. After a few days, you might as well just punch a hole in your horse's gut. If your horse is not in obvious discomfort and is not moving around risking further injury, I wouldn't give any at all.

If you need a substitute for cold hosing, Dover Saddlery sells and ice tape that's on sale this month for $13. You wrap the leg like a polo wrap and can leave it on for hours. It is very effective in drawing heat out of the leg. You can only use it for up to 20 times, but it's a great alternative to cold hosing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Please be careful with the bute. Horse people seem to use that stuff like they're TicTacs. Bute is VERY hard on a horse's stomach. After a few days, you might as well just punch a hole in your horse's gut. If your horse is not in obvious discomfort and is not moving around risking further injury, I wouldn't give any at all.

If you need a substitute for cold hosing, Dover Saddlery sells and ice tape that's on sale this month for $13. You wrap the leg like a polo wrap and can leave it on for hours. It is very effective in drawing heat out of the leg. You can only use it for up to 20 times, but it's a great alternative to cold hosing.
if the horse is going to benefit from cold hosing/cold therapy it normally happens in a 10-20 min. period and prolonging the exposure won't really do more for it. I'm not saying that it's bad for it at all, but our vet suggests alternating cold therapy for 20min. then leaving it be for awhile and then re-applying.

another alternative to cold hosing that you might have easier access to is ice packs. I would not leave the horse unsupervised with them on though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
hey guys, thank you for all of the responses! I ended up using snow in a plastic bag to ice it. I just used a standing wrap to keep it on. The vet is coming out today so we will see what she says....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Good thinking.:wink:

I have done that in the past or, if you have ample snow.....I have had the horse stand in a snow bank,,, works well, when cold hosing isnt an option.

Another great idea is a bag of peas....they dont freeze completely solid like most veggies because of their circular shape, so they can be manipulated into the shape needed...ie around an ankle or over cannon bone
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top