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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hiya..

So... it's driving me INSANE. I hoover. Wash. Dryer. I've brushed. I'd have to get through an entire roll of cellotape per saddle cloth. Actually... I've been buying a saddle cloth almost every two months just to avoid this but NO MORE.

TELL ME YOUR SECRETS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I HAVE A DYSON! I SPENT SO MUCH MONEY ON THIS HOOVER JUST TO GET OUT HORSE HAIR LOL.

Sorry for all caps I just lost a battle to a numnah. <3
 

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Hiya..

So... it's driving me INSANE. I hoover. Wash. Dryer. I've brushed. I'd have to get through an entire roll of cellotape per saddle cloth. Actually... I've been buying a saddle cloth almost every two months just to avoid this but NO MORE.

TELL ME YOUR SECRETS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I HAVE A DYSON! I SPENT SO MUCH MONEY ON THIS HOOVER JUST TO GET OUT HORSE HAIR LOL.

Sorry for all caps I just lost a battle to a numnah. <3
What material is it made out of? I've not had this problem, except on my sheepskin or felt pads.


Does every hair have to be gone? I'm not sure one can reach that standard of clean...
 

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I’ve used rubber gloves (the kind you use for dish washing or house cleaning; they can have a hole in them and that won’t matter) with good success on furniture to rid it of cat hair so perhaps it would work on the saddle pads. Just put the gloves on, start stroking the area you want in one direction with some pressure using short quick strokes. The hair/fuss will start to pile up and then you lift it off.

For me, I can live with a bit of hair on a saddle pad as I’m either lazy or I would rather focus on doing something more relaxing and fun with the horses.🤪
 

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When you say nunnah, I think of a wool pad, and when you say saddle pads I think of cloth ones.

I don't think those wool ones can really be cleaned effectively on an ongoing basis. Maybe dry-cleaned every now and then? I protect mine with the cloth saddle pad underneath.

If it's a cloth saddle pad, I wash mine whenever they get to a certain point of dirty / hairiness. I have a top-load washing machine and I put them in there and agitate / soak / agitate / soak. Then I put them in the dryer (tumbler dryer to you). The dryer gets off a lot of the hair that the washing machine didn't. Maybe the drying process creates some sort of static that gets it all? I just put them in there long enough to get off enough hair to where I feel like they're clean, then I hang them to dry.
 
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I'm confused by the question.


If you mean saddle pad - not saddle blanket (Two very different things where I'm from), then I vacuum if it's kinda bad... Do as best I can and move on down the road. By the end of summer they'll have crusty places from sweat, dirt, and hair, that pack together. That's when I lay them out on a freshly cleaned stretch of concrete, use the pressure washer with a 'delicates' tip, or the pistol grip sprayer nozzle on 'jet'. Also, the hose gets to lay out in the summer sun so the water coming out of there, at first, is scalding hot. Does a good job dissolving the dirt and grime, and by the time it's really soaking into the pad, the water temp has cooled to air temp... and by the 5 minute mark, it's been pumped out of the ground, cooled the pex line, and it's a nice 76 degrees (ground water temp in our area).


Usually just the force of the water gets the nasty stuff off along with lots and lots of hair. I hang them up to dry (Either on the catch pen or off a boat trailer, or the tailgate of a truck - whatever - and leave them overnight. Then vacuum, maybe.


Pads with a fleece or felt backing get the same treatment as the wool pads.


Blankets - I DO NOT WASH THEM IN THE MACHINE because all but one of mine are wool. A machine, esp an agitator type, will, sooner or later, pull them out of shape. I vacuum them regularly with a shark stick type vacuum cleaner, or drape them on the fence and whack them with a broom (like cleaning a rug before vacuum cleaners were A Thing), or spot clean them with a clean wet cloth. If they're caking up with sweat and grime and hair, I'll wash them with the hose or soak them in a tub of air temp water overnight, then hang up to air dry.


I've yet to use any soap, shampoo, or detergent - our fire chief is an old school roper, about 65 years old now. He told me the horror story of taking his favorite pad to the car wash to pressure wash it, got the bright idea to use a degreaser out of the wand on it, did so, said it got soooo cleannnnn... but he never got all the chemicals out of it. His horse would break out in hives and scab up and just have all sorts of problems after that. He had to throw that pad away.



So. Yeah. Unless it's caking up and causing hard spots or crusting under the pad, I just vacuum every so often (More often than not because Oops has broke into my tack room in the shop or the trailer, and Tossed All Teh Things into the grass and sand... thanks sis.), never use soap on them, hose them off on the concrete apron in front of the shop once or twice a summer season, then air dry.



Hair is just part of it, and there is no escaping it.
 
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I'm a western rider so I realize my pads/blankets might be more acceptable for horse hair because of what they are made of (wool or wool blend) but I don't fight the hair, I embrace it! I don't even try to remove it, unless there is a thick clump or something. But mostly it just works it's way into my wool blankets and becomes a part of them. I wash them, anytime they are overly sweaty actually, and if hair comes out, great. But if not, that's great too.


Another member on here has a quote, something like "there is nothing more natural on a horse than horse hair." I think that was BSMS. And I think he was referring to cinches......or it could have been blankets, I don't remember for sure. But either way, I think it rings true.


I know on an english style pad, they probably stand out more and look cruddier, but hey, it's just horse hair. The horse is already covered in it! (And shedding season is just around the corner.) :hide:


So if I was trying to remove it, I would maybe use a rubber curry to get off the worst of it. But other than that, I think it's a loosing battle.
 

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I do wash my wool saddle blankets (Mayatexs) regularly in a large muck bucket by hand. I soak them with a little wool wash detergent I get from the dollar store (which is optional I admit, but I like to suds them a little), hand wash, rinse with a little fabric softener (because I like the smell of clean laundry!) and hang to dry, either over my tie rail or over a plastic lawn chair. I've been washing them this way for years. Never had one fall apart or get permanently misshapen yet. Highly recommend!

But yeah, don't ever machine wash or heaven forbid put in a dryer. But they hand-wash, drip dry just fine. And get softer with use. I love how they feel "broken in." When they are new, they are stiff. :pinkunicorn:
 

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I wait until hair is literally coming off in sheets before I try to remove any from a saddle pad. I use a shedding blade to peel back the layers - because at that point, it practically is its own horse. Then good to go for another year or so! This only works on pads with a flat tight covering, else you'll be pulling apart the material itself.
 

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Dear @Kalraii, I don't know if it's any help to you, but...there is no numnah police who are going to arrest you if there is residual hair on your numnahs after washing. :)

You have a grey, which means if you avoid black numnahs, you're avoiding the hair being really obvious - you could go for a numnah similar in colour to your horse. Of course, white or cream numnahs may be difficult to keep clean in other ways, and tend to go brown, depending on how dirty your horse gets (outdoors horses with free access to dirt and white saddle cloths don't go together...). However, it may be easier to put a white saddle cloth in a bucket of NapiSan (or other oxygen bleach for nappies) overnight, than to get rid of hair on a saddle cloth.

For hair camouflage, you might also consider a tie-dye numnah, which you could easily make yourself if not commercially available. You could start a whole new trend! :Angel:
 

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I founds this brush once on super sale https://www.ridingwarehouse.com/Haa...100929665452&utm_content=all stable & trailer

For the price I was thinking if it doesn't work, it was a cheap try. But (for me) that thing WORKS! Cleaned up my wool felt pad to almost new condition (ok, a few stray hairs will remain). Doesn't work as well on fleece/shearling. But getting cat/dog her from couch and co? Perfect :biggrin:
 

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I’ve used rubber gloves (the kind you use for dish washing or house cleaning; they can have a hole in them and that won’t matter) with good success on furniture to rid it of cat hair so perhaps it would work on the saddle pads. Just put the gloves on, start stroking the area you want in one direction with some pressure using short quick strokes. The hair/fuss will start to pile up and then you lift it off.

For me, I can live with a bit of hair on a saddle pad as I’m either lazy or I would rather focus on doing something more relaxing and fun with the horses.🤪
Tried it on a wool saddle pad, it does pick up hair, but not the embedded stuff. As far as I'm concerned, the embedded horse hair makes the saddle pad more valuable.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OMG hahah you guys... ok i feel better. It just amazes me though that the yard owner who has to wash a batch for her entire school string... they come out with NOT A SINGLE HAIR! And thus... I look at my lovely expensive wool pads (I've collected an entire rainbows worth) in shame... I have a few synthetic but they really made her back too hot. I mean there was so much hair that I could have used it as a slide sheet... but hoover on max power does nothing on these clean hairs. I even hoovered it before. OK I shall go through this thread and it's advice and get back with my findings! ^>^ ty you all...! @SueC sure feels like it sometimes haha!
 

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OMG hahah you guys... ok i feel better. It just amazes me though that the yard owner who has to wash a batch for her entire school string... they come out with NOT A SINGLE HAIR! And thus... I look at my lovely expensive wool pads (I've collected an entire rainbows worth) in shame... I have a few synthetic but they really made her back too hot. I mean there was so much hair that I could have used it as a slide sheet... but hoover on max power does nothing on these clean hairs. I even hoovered it before. OK I shall go through this thread and it's advice and get back with my findings! ^>^ ty you all...! @SueC sure feels like it sometimes haha!
Could you sneak a pad every week into her batch of laundry? Easies way to get them clean :rofl:
 

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OMG hahah you guys... ok i feel better. It just amazes me though that the yard owner who has to wash a batch for her entire school string... they come out with NOT A SINGLE HAIR! And thus...
Mmmmmmh. Are you sure they are real horses at that school, and not some form of android (or should that be equioid?)... :pinkunicorn:
 
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