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My horse is an OTTB and he has been off for a year and I have just recently put him training. During his year off he had lost weight and slowly gained some back but you can still see his ribs and spine and everything. I have him on oats, sweet feed, dumor pelleted feed and he also gets a total performance supplement along with a squirt of oil once a day. He is almost out of his feeds so I figured this would be a good time to ask if anyone knew of a good feed to feed him to help with his performance along with his weight gain and muscle building. I have been looking at the different Purina Omolene's and the Nutrena Safe Choice Feeds. I also thought about beet bulp and a rice bran supplement like Max-E-Glo. If anyone has any suggestions that would be wonderful! Thank you everyone in advance!
 

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Wow he's on a lot! Honestly I would take him off of all of it, especially the sweet feed, it's definitely not ideal for horses. I have had very good luck with feeding Triple Crown Senior to a hard keeper TB. It has a lot of beet pulp, which is good for weight. I've also found it doesn't make horses hot. And if he's still having a little trouble with weight I would look into adding rice bran. Me personally I would also look into ulcers or do a fecal egg count, as that's a lot of feed/supplements to not be keeping weight on with.
 

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What kind of hay is he getting and how much?

I've had great success with Nutrena SafeChoice Senior.

And I like Cool Calories for added fat to the diet.

For sure do a Fecal Egg Count on him. And a ulcer exam would be high on my list as well pending what other symptoms he shows.
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I agree that Triple Crown Senior is a great product. It works well for our hard keepers. I wouldn't bother with Cool Calories though -- it offers the same number of calories as feeding your horse oil, only it's way more expensive, has artificial flavors, and is hydrogenated (which we know isn't the greatest).

When I have a hard keeper that I want more weight on, I feed Triple Crown Senior, beet pulp, and canola oil. I'll usually feed them 1 cup of oil per day (8 oz). This is of course accompanied by 24/7 access to good quality hay, which is the most important part.
 

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I switched my mare to Purina Ultium last year and have done nothing but sing its praises since. It has twice the amount of fat as SafeChoice (14%, I believe) but slightly less protein. My mare built up much more muscle and retained her topline over the winter, despite being out of work due to the cold, which she has never done. My BO was so impressed with the change in her physique that she switched two of her own horses to it.

It does cost a bit more than SafeChoice (SafeChoice here is $14 a bag and Ultium is $24), but I feed much less Ultium than I did before when I had her on Strategy, which is quite similar to SafeChoice.
 

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Keep it simple! Good quality hay, added salt either through a block or added with feed and a high fiber extruded pellets. If the horse is losing weight, up the hay to free choice, if that fails, involve a vet, something is wrong. Add this, that and what have you, makes an owner feel good but does not do much for a healthy horse, make the horse healthy first!
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Is the Triple Crown Senior feed good for helping him build his muscle back up as well? A lot of other people I have talked to suggested triple crown as well and I might try it and see what it does for him. SullysRider he is a very lazy horse so if you have something that will work but can make a horse hot I don't think it will really affect him he's never been very hot even when he was on the track. I appreciate all of your guys help! Thank you everyone so much. I'm hoping one of your guys suggestions will work for him.
 

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When were his teeth last checked? TBs seem to need their teeth floated more often than other breeds. Sharp points can cause weight loss as they create ulcers in the cheeks. The feed companies are very competitive so any senior feed will help him altho not until he's 5. Start with 2lbs per feeding and all the hay he wants. A small mesh hay net is great for stuffing the hay in as it slows the down which results in better digestion. They're less than $10. Provide loose salt as well as a lick. A lick doesn't provide enough salt as it causes a sore tongue). He needs plenty of turnout as that is primary for digestion. He likely has ulcers being from the track, a cause of weight loss. Do not exceed 5lb per meal of any supplemental feeding, that's anything other than hay. He needs the long fiber of hay. The more you can scatter the grain/pellets it prevents the horse from bolting down large amounts at a time. The faster it goes in, the faster it comes out.
 

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My horse is an OTTB and he has been off for a year and I have just recently put him training. During his year off he had lost weight and slowly gained some back but you can still see his ribs and spine and everything. I have him on oats, sweet feed, dumor pelleted feed and he also gets a total performance supplement along with a squirt of oil once a day. He is almost out of his feeds so I figured this would be a good time to ask if anyone knew of a good feed to feed him to help with his performance along with his weight gain and muscle building. I have been looking at the different Purina Omolene's and the Nutrena Safe Choice Feeds. I also thought about beet bulp and a rice bran supplement like Max-E-Glo. If anyone has any suggestions that would be wonderful! Thank you everyone in advance!
Keep in mind some basic things about how the equine digestive system is designed and works. Our goal should be to keep from messing it up with what we feed them. Simplified: They are designed to graze so fiber is ideal. In your case easily digested fiber with extra, healthy calories. Starch is not good (there's always some in the grazing and they are designed for dealing with those very low levels of starch, but you don't need to be adding anything that adds more than they would get from nature.

Basically grains = starch so avoid grain. Corn is the worst, but even processed oats (the most digestible) which is still 40% starch and less than 50% digestible. I won't get into the problems it does create and can create (it's been posted to death on another thread and just don't feel like digging through the medical information and tests again). Here's the link if you want to read about it. Got started over a question about feeding corn.
http://www.horseforum.com/horse-nutrition/cracked-corn-362217/

Healthy way of putting on weight:
Beet pulp is excellent. About the easiest digestible fiber available. The fiber digesting hindgut microbes love it (that's where the starches create problems). Higher nutritional value than any hay (about 30% or more depending on the hay).
Copra is excellent. Super easy to digest and is basically dealt with in the foregut.
Both very low in starch so that the hindgut isn't having to deal with more of it. Both high in healthy calories.
Using a high quality hay with is also great (forage is the ideal for a horse).

Rice brand will help with the extra calories, but if you go that route I'd work on getting them off of it when the weight is up (and don't over feed it). Most grain brands are like junk food (i.e. the horses love it, but that doesn't make it a healthy choice....think Cheetos, etc.... :lol:). Great for getting them to ingest things though (think medicine coated sugar cubes for children....if you're old enough to remember those days :lol:)

Not that it has anything to do with your specific issue (but is often over looked by owners as the feed industry strives to lead people around by the nose :lol:)
If you're grazing over a large, diverse grazing area you should be ok, but if you're relying mostly on a limited choice of grazing and the rest is feed and hay then you might want to check on the needed amino acids, and that the mineral levels and ratios are acceptable.
Don't lose sleep if it's not "text book" perfect (the amounts and ratios aren't an exact science) just get it acceptably close. It will change some throughout the year (e.g. mineral content in hay can vary depending on source, when it was cut and even age). And what my friend in the next county uses to balance out his horses diet might not be what I need since, even if we feed the same hay, our grazing is different (ground can have different mineral content so the vegetation will also).

How do the feral horses manage? Horses that roam over 200,000+ acres are functioning in the way that nature designed their bodies to work (both outside and inside). They will graze on a very diverse assortment of vegetation with varying mineral and nutritional value on different days. The closest thing they'll come to grain is if some of the grass has gone to seed, but will amount to a very small volume and will be very limited (some horses don't even care for it :lol:) Very few people have the luxury of being able to keep horses under conditions which are that natural so ideally we have to try and simulate what they would get under those conditions.
 
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Keep in mind some basic things about how the equine digestive system is designed and works. Our goal should be to keep from messing it up with what we feed them. Simplified: They are designed to graze so fiber is ideal. In your case easily digested fiber with extra, healthy calories. Starch is not good (there's always some in the grazing and they are designed for dealing with those very low levels of starch, but you don't need to be adding anything that adds more than they would get from nature.

Basically grains = starch so avoid grain. Corn is the worst, but even processed oats (the most digestible) which is still 40% starch and less than 50% digestible. I won't get into the problems it does create and can create (it's been posted to death on another thread and just don't feel like digging through the medical information and tests again). Here's the link if you want to read about it. Got started over a question about feeding corn.
http://www.horseforum.com/horse-nutrition/cracked-corn-362217/

Healthy way of putting on weight:
Beet pulp is excellent. About the easiest digestible fiber available. The fiber digesting hindgut microbes love it (that's where the starches create problems). Higher nutritional value than any hay (about 30% or more depending on the hay).
Copra is excellent. Super easy to digest and is basically dealt with in the foregut.
Both very low in starch so that the hindgut isn't having to deal with more of it. Both high in healthy calories.
Using a high quality hay with is also great (forage is the ideal for a horse).

Rice brand will help with the extra calories, but if you go that route I'd work on getting them off of it when the weight is up (and don't over feed it). Most grain brands are like junk food (i.e. the horses love it, but that doesn't make it a healthy choice....think Cheetos, etc.... :lol:). Great for getting them to ingest things though (think medicine coated sugar cubes for children....if you're old enough to remember those days :lol:)

Not that it has anything to do with your specific issue (but is often over looked by owners as the feed industry strives to lead people around by the nose :lol:)
If you're grazing over a large, diverse grazing area you should be ok, but if you're relying mostly on a limited choice of grazing and the rest is feed and hay then you might want to check on the needed amino acids, and that the mineral levels and ratios are acceptable.
Don't lose sleep if it's not "text book" perfect (the amounts and ratios aren't an exact science) just get it acceptably close. It will change some throughout the year (e.g. mineral content in hay can vary depending on source, when it was cut and even age). And what my friend in the next county uses to balance out his horses diet might not be what I need since, even if we feed the same hay, our grazing is different (ground can have different mineral content so the vegetation will also).

How do the feral horses manage? Horses that roam over 200,000+ acres are functioning in the way that nature designed their bodies to work (both outside and inside). They will graze on a very diverse assortment of vegetation with varying mineral and nutritional value on different days. The closest thing they'll come to grain is if some of the grass has gone to seed, but will amount to a very small volume and will be very limited (some horses don't even care for it :lol:) Very few people have the luxury of being able to keep horses under conditions which are that natural so ideally we have to try and simulate what they would get under those conditions.
love love LOVE this post! Its full of tons of good info! Horses are grazers. WE added in grains. Grass and free choice hay is the best for him. Some beet pulp is good, but remember that beet pulp is made out of sugar beets and a lot of companies add molasses. I do like rice bran to a point, and have used it, but like mentioned its best to taper off when the horse is at a good weight. I recently added more alfalfa pellets to my horses diet. Black oil sunflower seed is high in fat, high in protein plus the omega 3's and oils are great for them. I would get his teeth check, do a fecal, and test for ulcers. Finding out why he isn't gaining weight is your first step.
 
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