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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my trainer found this saddle at a garage sale for $20 and told me I could try fixing it up since for myself since she was planning on selling it herself. It was made in England and is black and brown. There is some rubbing off/fading of the black colour and that’s one of the things I’d like to get back. Any tips on how I can get this saddle looking great for dressage? I’ll add a photo of it after I cleaned off all the dust B2E96228-61F0-4B83-A002-46625B54A3A5_1567884555765.jpg
 

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Before you do ANYTHING, check the integrity of the tree. try bending it in aall kinds of direction. If you feel it bend , or see the leather wrinkle much, the tree may be cracked. lay it down on the ground, upside down, and look at it squarely from the back, right down the channel. is it even? or crooked.


If the tree is true, then you may need to at least have it reflocked, if the padding is all lumpy, as I bet it is. You can dye the leather if you want to get it back to original color, but then there is always the risk of the dye rubbing off on your breeches. If it is physically in good shape (also check the billets!), then it might be a good working saddle, but may never really look good enough for showing.


Is it a Crosby? did you look under the flap to see if the brads have a name stamped in them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Before you do ANYTHING, check the integrity of the tree. try bending it in aall kinds of direction. If you feel it bend , or see the leather wrinkle much, the tree may be cracked. lay it down on the ground, upside down, and look at it squarely from the back, right down the channel. is it even? or crooked.


If the tree is true, then you may need to at least have it reflocked, if the padding is all lumpy, as I bet it is. You can dye the leather if you want to get it back to original color, but then there is always the risk of the dye rubbing off on your breeches. If it is physically in good shape (also check the billets!), then it might be a good working saddle, but may never really look good enough for showing.


Is it a Crosby? did you look under the flap to see if the brads have a name stamped in them?
So the tree is fine. Not cracked or crooked or anything. And I checked and found that it’s a Lovatt & Ricketts.
 

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Clean the saddle well....
As for dying it or trying to improve the looks...don't!
What bothers you is not seen when astride...it is all under your butt or leg so I would not worry about it.

A good cleaning with quality saddle soap or glycerine bar will do much for the appearance of it.
Bet a light application of pure Neatsfoot oil would probably do some good to a saddle that has been neglected as this one appears...
Very thin coats of the oil, let soak in a few minutes then wipe off the excess, buff to a shine and go ride.
As long as structurally all is good....tree, billets, fit and stiffed panels you are sitting on a saddle worth a bit of money.
Enjoy your starting to ride in this.
You now have the opportunity to save for a newer saddle, better condition yet ride and enjoy the sport as you save & search....sounds a good deal to me.

Do not "shoe-polish" the saddle, and if you don't really know how to dye leather successfully....
At the risk of ruining your clothing and making appearances worse....just don't.
Honestly, where the marks are is where they will again appear as it is stirrup leathers and seat friction that made that saddle lose tanning properties...leave it be.
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 
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The underside of the saddle looks a little flat, it will be much more comfortable for you and the horse to get it reflocked.
 
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