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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I am a new pony mom in the Uk. My lovely boy is 14 and has always had skin issues in the summer. He rubs at his mane and tail and the skin is flaky and obviously irritated 馃槪. Vets have never made a diagnosis but have ruled out sweet itch. He has an itch-free supplement which helps but doesn鈥檛 stop it. Previous owner used to hog him to keep it at bay but I was hoping some of you lovely people might have some advice of things we could try before we have to chop off his lovely mane. Otherwise he is really healthy, has a gorgeous glossy, summer coat, strong hooves and is generally well in himself. He has always been well cared for and I would hope we will continue to do that! Will try and add some photos so you can see what I mean. TIA for any pearls of wisdom!馃檪
 

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Could this be rainrot? Or primary seborrhea? (from Watch out for 8 common equine skin diseases).

. Primary seborrhea (dandruff)
  • Appearance: Seborrhea can be dry or oily. In the dry form, small flakes of skin appear routinely, usually at the base of the mane and tail, and sand-like flecks may appear on the girth area or anywhere sweat accumulates. Oily seborrhea causes large, waxy crusts, often on the elbows, hocks or lower legs; when peeled off, these may leave hairless patches up to several inches in diameter. Dandruff sometimes causes a fetid odor, but the horse is not usually itchy or in pain.
  • Causes: Heredity plays a significant role in cases of primary seborrhea, and it is more common in Arabians and Thoroughbreds. In affected individuals, dandruff is likely to be a lifelong issue. Please note, however, that primary seborrhea looks just like secondary seborrhea, which can also be either oily or dry. The biggest difference is that secondary seborrhea develops in horses who had not previously experienced the condition, although the onset can be very gradual. Secondary seborrhea is a sign that can accompany several potentially serious illnesses, including liver or intestinal disease.
  • Do I need to treat it? No, but most people prefer to do so for aesthetic reasons. Consult your veterinarian if your horse develops seborrhea or if a mild case seems to be getting significantly worse with no obvious explanation.
  • Treatment: Primary seborrhea is not curable, but it can be managed. A number of antidandruff shampoos are available that, when used as directed, can dissolve flakes and loosen oily scales. It's best to choose products formulated for use on horses; human products can be too harsh. Gentle scrubbing with a soft- to medium-bristled brush can help remove crusts. If you have difficulty controlling a stubborn case, talk to your veterinarian, who may recommend other topical medications. She may also suggest performing diagnostic work, such as blood tests, to rule out other causes. Secondary seborrhea is likely to clear up when the underlying disease is treated.
  • Prevention: Regular grooming stimulates circulation and natural oil production that help keep the skin healthy and clean. Feeding vegetable oils, especially omega-3 fatty acids, and supplements that contain biotin may also help promote healthier skin. Talk to your veterinarian or an equine nutritionist before making changes in your horse's die
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don鈥檛 think rain rot because he has only started getting bad in the last couple of weeks - really got worse this week - and we saw no sign of it in the miserable rainy weather we had last month. So more likely to be the second one although he is itchy with it and rubs. 馃槪
 

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My vet told me to treat itchy scaly tail heads and manes the same way as rain rot because both are skin infections caused by an irritant like gnat bites and then some combo of bacteria and fungus sets up shop.

First, wash with medicated shampoo (I use Equiderma with neem oil but that might not be available in the UK), then after a thorough rinse, follow with a mild antimicrobial cleanser (I use very diluted Betadine or hexachlorophine because I happened to have those in stock in my tackroom pharmacy). Then I massage in a sweet-itch lotion from Equiderma. So far my mare hasn't rubbed her tail bald this summer, like she did last year. If I see her rubbing I do another treatment.
 

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Well it often does!! but it has been pretty dry and warm for the last 10 days.

He could be really hot and sweating. It creates ideal conditions for rain scald. The skin gets itchy then irritated and the bacteria moves in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That鈥檚 what I was thinking. So then I guess I should be treating it like that? As Avna suggested.
His previous owner recommended putting a hood on him to protect his mane but could that be actually making it worse? 馃槷
 

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That鈥檚 what I was thinking. So then I guess I should be treating it like that? As Avna suggested.
His previous owner recommended putting a hood on him to protect his mane but could that be actually making it worse? 馃槷
Yes as Avna suggested. Wash until healed with dilute Hibiscrub, an antimicrobial skin cleanser, and make sure it's dry afterwards.

You need something breathable and lightweight if you're going to cover an area. We used to have a native who could get it under his really long and thick mane due to humidity and he shared a field with a TB who got the lower limb version, mud fever, in the winter.
 
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@Ponymumlk I saw this on a UK forum. It is all natural and the folks that tried it seemed happy with it:)

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ha yeah! Thanks anyway! I have found the hibiscrub on Amazon so happy days will give that a go.馃構 As well as apparently Listerine and Baby oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Walkinthewalk thank you. Funnily enough his stable mate has turmeric. He already has an itch free supplement which has chamomile and garlic and something else in it.
 

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Make sure you supplement with something that contains vitamin A & E, both help the skin ward off conditions.
 
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"As she's in the UK, searching for Hibiclens won't get her very far!;)"

That is why I said in the US it is known as Hibiclens. It is for our many viewers who live in the United States.
 

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Our new pony has something very similar. I put it down to him wearing a rug all the time and being irritated by ground in dirt and sweat (just a theory) .
However, thought eucalyptus wash might help. Weather was rapidly cooling before I could get into town so used the dogs eucalyptus shampoo. 1 wash made a huge difference - unfortunately too cold now to wash again which would be preferable. Also brushing (I use a stiff brush) every day to loosen and expel the dry skin.

He is looking so much better now and is not rubbing himself silly.
 
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