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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My daughter is having trouble with her posting diagonal.
She is an 11 yo and is not very big.
She is riding a quarterhorse to compete in a beginner hunter class this summer.
She has a bit of trouble getting on the right posting diagonal as he is a wide horse and she cannot see to tell if she is on the right diagonal.

Does anyone have any suggestions or tricks to help?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Also, I forgot to say, because he is so big, she says she cannot "feel" it, does this make any sense? I would have thought that would make it even more obvious.
 

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Well, you might want to have her work on "feeling" the diagnal. On any horse in a sow if a judge catches you looking, you can have points taken off so it's a good ideal to learn the technique anyway. Julie goodnight has a great youtube video that explains a bit better the exercises to learn to do this at YouTube - juliegoodnight's Channel You will probably need to help her or be with her because it does entail her closing her eyes while riding in order to learn to feel it.
 

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darn cat, as I was saying before she got on the keyboard and hit submit....It was really really hard for me to learn at first too, and the horse I'm riding right now I am still trying to get a feel for it on her (she's big boned and a huge hay belly). I usually practice or try to feel it about 15 minutes each day. Some horses I can pick up a feel for right away, others sometimes takes me a week or more
 

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I don't quite get what you mean by that she can't see.. try watching the horse's shoulders, rise when they're forward, sit when they're back (the outside shoulder when you look down, depending on which rein you're on)

And it took me a while to feel it at first, it takes a long time to get used to what is normal for the horse and to feel anything abnormal.
 

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Someone once told me that they put bright colored polo wraps on the front legs that way it would be easier to see when it comes froward and such don't know how true or effective it is though....might be a fun way for her to learn though
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can't thank you all enough for your suggestions, I will pass these thoughts on to my girl and see what works!
 

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Something that can help is to put a strip of duct tape on the horse's shoulder so that she can spot the movement easier until she learns how to "rise and fall to the wall". To help her learn to feel the horse's feet, try at the walk first. Have someone on the ground call a foot (say, right front), and have her say "now" when she feels that foot hit the ground, and the spotter validates her guess. When she can name each footstep at the walk, move to the trot. She'll be feeling for her diagonals then.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the thought.
Which way should I put the tape, hortizontal or vertical?
I am thinking vertical to coincide with the leg movemtent.
Just want to be sure.
Thanks again.
 

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Thanks for the thought.
Which way should I put the tape, hortizontal or vertical?
I am thinking vertical to coincide with the leg movemtent.
Just want to be sure.
Thanks again.
I would put the tape along the slope of the horse's scapula. Not necessarily the whole length of the shoulder, but along that angle. When the horse steps forward and the leg is up, more of the tape is visible, showing the "up beat" of the stride. The tricky part is to not rely on the tape to get the diagonal, but to use it to double check your feel.
 

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Look down(with your eyes only don't put your head down), when his outside shoulder(facing the fence) goes forward, she goes up, when it goes back she goes down.
 

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It took me FOREVER to learn the correct diagonal. My trainer used tape, polos, closing my eyes, walking, EVERYTHING. She was at a loss.
One day I was cooling my horse down, and my trainer was talking to another student and explaining WHAT the correct diagonal was, and by watching the other rider and listening to my trainer, it finally clicked.
Perhaps she's like me, and when something isn't clicking, no matter how many times you try the same methods, it just doesn't work. Can you have the trainer explain what to look for on another horse/rider pair? Maybe put different colored polo wraps or boots on the horse's front legs and have the trainer "teach" the other rider how to get on and look for the correct diagonal with your daughter watching? That way she has a visual to connect to (I am a very very visual learner...)
Think of it this way:
Pretend you are trying to tell someone who doesn't know our alphabet to write the letter W, and you try to do so without showing them how to do so. You explain "well, you draw four slashes facing away from one another, so the person perhaps writes "\\\\." You say, you're half right, now face two of the slashes away from the other two; you get maybe something like this: ''\\//." No matter how hard you try and explain what a W looks like, sometimes seeing it done by another person is all it takes for the lesson to 'click.'


Okay, in retrospect, my W story doesn't really add up... but I'll leave it in the off chance it's even slightly helpful.
 

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The way I learned it.... Rise and fall with the leg on the wall..
 
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