The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First post..yay..
Recently purchased a 8 yo QH..not 100% of his history, but he has roping background. The guy that has had him the past two years has only sporatically used him on the trail. He started having issues with him being difficult riding away from the barn. He even reared over on him once. But he was riding him in a pretty harsh curb, and he said he normally rides in a snaffle. Also, he was being extremly harsh correcting him,and basically wailing on him.

I havent had many rides on him yet.. Does ok in the arena, but is stubborn riding out from the barn.. One rein stops and circles seems to correct this.

He neck reins beautifully and responds to legs yeild well.

I am pretty sure he needs floated, and that will be done before he is bitted again.


My questiion. I feel I should keep him in the snaffle while I am tuning him up. But shouldnt snaffles be used to direct rein.? I dont want to regress, but dont want to counter act any softness work either. Like I said, he neck reins great with tbe snaffle , but just wondering what tbe progression should be. Also concern about previous reaction to the curb. I feel like his teeth are the issue, because if he roped at all surely he was in a curb bit.
Any insight would be appreciated.
Oh..I do plan to use this guy in barrels and or cow work.. thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
I nearly always train in a snaffle unless the horse is super experienced and just needs only refinement of something, but on a re-work horse like that I would go to snaffle without hesitation. Neck reining can be taught in a snaffle and it usually starts there anyway so there shouldn't be an issue with that.

If his teeth aren't the issue he could just have developed a barn sourness and that will have to be trained out of the horse. Barn sour and buddy sour which in general is just the horse wanting to be somewhere other than where the rider wants is ridiculously common so my bet is that if teeth aren't the issue than destination addiction e.g. wanting to be somewhere else, is probably the issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,747 Posts
While snaffle bits are the preferred bit for direct reining, neck reining can be done with any bit or no bit at all.

True softness is achieved by riding without unnecessary tension in rider or horse – although false “softness” may be achieved through harsh treatment.

A snaffle bit should be all that is needed unless this horse is to be ridden in “high school” dressage or any competition which requires another bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49,417 Posts
I agree with what Andy said. Stick with the snaffle until the barn sour nurse is no more and issue.

What I would be more concerned with is a horse that river is up and falls over on the rider. That’s something to be careful with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I always start in a snaffle and usually stay in one. I neck rein train my horses anyway, so a snaffle or halter or brideless is never a problem.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,088 Posts
If you want to keep him in a curb, try this one:


Nothing harsh about it. Take some time to work with him on the ground, like this:


In this case, teaching to give in the vertical would be more important than giving side to side. Make sure he understands that when YOU ride, HE gets to decide when his mouth gets a release - that the instant he yields, you will give release. Drop the reins if needed (in an arena). If the horse knows he can move his nose a little and get total relief, he has no need to rear. Practice a LOT of stops from a walk to cement the idea. Find a spot where he can eat a little grass, then pull his head away from the grass using the reins. You can do the second standing next to him on the ground. Let him understand he can get release any time he wants.

Edit to add: Lots of horses prefer a curb. Ridden with slack as the norm, taking up the slack will rotate a curb bit in the horse's mouth, with the sides rotating right next to his face, BEFORE any pressure is applied to the mouth. As long as you don't jerk the reins, this period of free rotation always provides a signal to the horse - a cue without pressure in the mouth. A very obvious cue, too! Spade bits are considered "signal bits", but any curb used lightly will provide a very clear, pressure-less signal to your horse.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top