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I just joined your wonderful forum. I have bred, and show quarter horses for 30 years, and I have loved everyday with these magnificent animals. I saw a video of a fresian one day now I can't get my mind off them. The only problem is I live close to the gulfcost. It gets very hot here in the summertime and I was wondering about anhydrosis. Does anyone have any thoughts on this. I know they are very expensive, but they are so beautiful! I don't want to purchase one and then have problems with this condition and I surely wouldn't want to cause the horse any harm. Any suggestions?
Thanks
Deborah
 

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Hi Deborah!
Welcome to the forum! AQH are my ultimate favorite breed!
I have no idea about Friesans though. They do look amazing though! Hopefully you will be able to find a way to own one of your own! Good luck!
Abby
 
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Well, they come from a country that rarely gets hot, so . . . might be not as well adapted to heat. I am not a big fresian fan. The have sweet temperments, but also have more health issues, I've heard. Also, the ride is often quite jaring, as they have SO much action. You must have a strong core and a young back to be ok with that. But, yeah, they are pretty and often super sweet.
 

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Hello and welcome! This appears to be a well written, informarive article on Fresians. It covers all The aspects of owning aFriesia , including climate they do best in.


Where it says:
“Friesians are best kept in cold weather climates. They don’t tolerate heat well. Friesians are prone to suffer from anhydrosis, lack of sweating. In hot environments, this can cause serious problems.

During warm months these horses should be monitored for anhydrosis. There are some treatment options that have shown positive results, such as reduced concentrate feeding, and vitamin E injections along with fluid and electrolyteinjections. However, most horses that suffer anhidrosis improve when they are moved to a cooler climate with lower humidity or housed in air-conditioned barns.”

They are a high maintenance horse. I hope this helpful:)
 
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