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Discussion Starter #1
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Candy was in the stall at night, she was perfectly fine in the evening when I put her in. She pust have stepped or kicked her front hoof (maybe while rolling?).
I just came from school, mom told me on the way home what's with Candy, she said Candy was licking her hoof and when she checked her she saw the injury. She washed it with water and tried to spray it (she missed). That was happening around 10 am.

I came at 14.30 and washed her with water again (she's standing in sawshavings) and put a 'bandage' on the wound to keep dirt and flies of.
Should I spray it?

I don't know how dangerous hoof injuries are. What should I be careful about?

There's this thing called 'wild meat' in slovene. It's meat growing from the injury. Could this happen here?
 

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This may sound completely unoriginal... but a vet would probably be in order. Hoof injuries generally aren't something to mess with if you have no experience- it could be the difference between her lifetime of ridability.
 

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It looks pretty minor and more like an abcess has blown out. I wouldn't do anything to it and I certainly wouldn't call a vet. Horses are robust animals and it takes quite a lot to injure one. If the horsee isn't lame I wouldn't worry about it at all.
 

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I agree with Kevin. It actually looks like she scraped it when she over-reached with her back hoof. Put some antibiotic ointment on it and leave it alone.
 

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If it's as superficial as it looks in the pictures, she will probably be fine with no treatment--just keep it relatively clean-ish. But if it's deeper than the photos reveal, then a vet visit may be in order in case there is damage to the coronet.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I put antibiotic spray on and bandaged it. I'm going to take the bandage of in the morning and leave the wound to air, maybe spray it again. She's not lame on the flat, but has problems on hills (it's a steep way to the field). Wound is not deep, there is no cut on the soft tissue in the hoof, only the hard layer went off.
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The damage appears superficial and presuming no serious trauma to the coronary tissues, this should heal well with minimal treatment.

Given the damage to the capsule, odds are fair that the drive-in studs are responsible. Probably scraped herself with the opposite foot/heel while moving around in the stall.

By the way... the left foot is clubbed. You know that, right?

Cheers,
Mark
 

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I looked and I looked and I don't see it, what do you see? (Not doubting you, just want to learn).

Learning is good. :wink:

The hoof in the photo presents overly long heels with a very deep central sulcus and associated separation. There's a reason for those long heels and it's not neglectful trimming or shoeing. It's a physiological reserve response to a contracted (congenitally shortened) flexor muscle/tendon group. Heel growth is forever "reaching" (growing) for ground level to compensate for that functionally shortened limb length disparity.

The wall at the quarters is very long and upright and the form of the hoof capsule tells me this is probably a significant club foot. When standing flat, the hoof dorsal wall will present an angle relative to ground parallel that exceeds 60 degrees... the general definition of a club.

A lateral photo of the foot would confirm.

Cheers,
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm worried!

Yesterday the red tissue was 2 milimeters under the capsule of hoof and now it's 3 milimeters out of the capsule. It's that just normal swelling or should I call vet?
It's unbandaged today.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I didn't know she has clubbed hoof, but I don't know that much about hooves. She has problems, hooves are not the same, but it's ok as long as farrier visits every 2 months. (He comes next week again)
Here is a pic from not a month ago (sorry I don't have any hoof pics here, but I can take them tomorrow):
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What can I do about her feet if they are clubbed? If tendons/muscles are involved, it can't be repaired, right? Maybe differnet trimming or corrective shoeing?
 

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The Second photo would seem to indicate a significant club foot, but the photo of the horse does not support the statements there. I see no hoof angle of greater than 60 degrees in front.

I expect she damaged the coronary band with the stud on the oppositite foot shoe. What are you using her for that she needs those big calks? Are you eventing over soft ground? If you can do away with those or have replaceable studs you use only when you ride, it would be better for the horse's legs. I see she is barefoot behind which indicates to me she is not ridden a lot on hard surfaces (like the road) where calks would be needed.

If this were my horse I would treat the would with Powdered alum (prevents proud flesh) after throughly washing it with soap and water and drying it. Your farrier is coming next week and if he/she is worth their salt, they will advise you further. If the wound is deep, a shot of Pennicillan might be in order (but it does not appear deep in the photos). A seriously DEEP puncture would beg to update her Tetnus shot.

You re-apply the powdered alum twice daily and you wash and dry the area before applying the alum once a day or until the surface is naturally dry (not oozing etc.).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
She is shoed on the back too, but anyway I'm getting her barefoot completly next week. I only do trail rides (a lot on asphalt and gravel) and my farrier sugested me to use this studs for better grip.
But I won't ride that much this winter so she'll be barefoot and if she is fine I'll leave her that way for summer too.

Thanks for advice. I've never heard of powdered alum and if I plan to buy I have to know what it is. It's aluminium, right? I've seen aluminium sprays in horse shops before, would this work too or does it have another purpose?

How quickly does proud flesh begin to form? (it's called 'wild meat' in slovene, that's what I've been asking in my first post). If the tisssue is swollen already now (it grew for 5milimeters!) is this a beggining of proud flesh?

The piece of hoof capsule has been removed. Since hoof is growing down, the hole will stay until the 'new' hoof grows?
 

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Hey Manca! As long as you are keeping the wound clean, free from debris and disinfecting it regularly it should heal up just fine on its own. *Personally* I wouldn't banadage as it doesn't look severe enough.

In regards to the swelling, coronet band injuries are very painful compared to other soft tissue injuries, a little like when you cut your finger on the cuticle - even a small paper cut stings right? It is a sensitive area. Also, injuries in this area (even the minor ones) are usually slow healing so be prepared for a recovery of a month or so.

Lastly, there is a chance that if the cut is right into the hoof, the hoof itself may show some scarring. This most likely won't affect your horse physically in anyway but may show an abnormal growth pattern once the wound has healed. Not much you can do about this but supplements such as vitamin E, zinc and selenium can help with tissue regeneration and scarring.

Good luck!
 

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POWDERED ALUM IS NOT ALUMINUM. It is a white powder you get (usually) from the pharmicist. It is Hydrated Potassium Aluminum Sulfate (a salt I believe). KAl(SO4)2 . 12H2O
 

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I would keep it unbandaged- clean it really well and put some betadine on the cut. My mare lost about a third of her back hoof early summer and has been healing very well by cleaning and letting it air out.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
POWDERED ALUM IS NOT ALUMINUM. It is a white powder you get (usually) from the pharmicist. It is Hydrated Potassium Aluminum Sulfate (a salt I believe). KAl(SO4)2 . 12H2O
Thanks :) I didn't know that. This is a thing I should have for injuries...

I'm already giving her hoof suplement that includes vitamin E, zinc, selenium, biotine and other things.

I think she's going to be fine. The swelling didn't go down, but it didn't swell more and it's not warmer than other places. It looks like dried scab.
 

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Hi manca,

Agree with others, that the wound doesn't look terrible at all. I too would leave it open. I'd treat it just with salt water, unless it actually does get infected. I think overusing chemical antiseptics can actually promote the development of your 'wild meat' .... that term just makes me think of venison or kangaroo steaks!:lol:

Yes, it appears her fronts are rather 'clubby', the left being possibly more so. I agree that Mark's explaination *could* be the reason. I don't believe that it is necessarily & obviously so though, or that it's obviously not due to bad trimming/shoeing. 'Club' foot/feet can come about for a number of reasons, ie congenital, posture, injury, to farriers just leaving too much heel combined with long term shoeing & contraction. I think there needs to be a lot more info before guessing at the cause or whether it's possible or desirable to try to change it or not.

hoofrehab.com is one source of info that has, among other info, articles on club feet. I would suggest you learn as much as you can from a variety of sources. Learn the pros & cons of different approaches and the principles behind them, for the best chance of doing what's best for your horse. I'm all for horses going shoeless generally, but that's not to say I think barefoot is necessarily best either.
 
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